Frost, Robert, 1874-1963

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1874-03-26
Death 1963-01-29
Gender:
Male
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

American poet from New England. Winner of the 1932 Pulitzer Prize.

From the description of Letters, 1931-1943. (University of Iowa Libraries). WorldCat record id: 122464432

American Pulitzer Prize-winning poet.

From the description of Letter to Mr. Beggen [?], 1928. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 86129842

Robert Frost was an American poet.

From the description of Papers concerning the Kennedy inaugural, 1960-1962. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 80601409

From the description of Additional papers, 1960-1963. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 80291087

From the guide to the Robert Frost additional papers, 1960-1963., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

From the guide to the Robert Frost papers concerning the Kennedy inaugural, 1960-1962., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

American poet; grew up in and around Lawrence, Mass.

From the description of Robert Frost memorabilia collection, 1962-1998. (Lawrence Public Library). WorldCat record id: 70958645

American poet.

From the description of Letter, 1936 February 6, to J.J. Lankes [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809936

From the description of A masque of reason [manuscript] , n.d. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647833768

From the description of Proofs of "Frost's Come In, and Other Poems," and of Sidney Cox's "A swinger of birches," [manuscript] page proofs, 1943 and 1957. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647833271

From the description of Proofs from "A Further Range [manuscript], 1936. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647824456

From the description of The letters of Robert Frost to Louis Untermeyer, 1963 [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647824770

From the description of Robert Frost collection of papers, [ca.1936-1951]. (University of California, Berkeley). WorldCat record id: 86118274

From the description of Telegrams from Robert Frost and Kathleen Morrison [manuscript], 1940 January 13 & February 1. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647810804

From the description of Letter, 1935 December, Amherst, Mass., to Mr. [Grover?] [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809909

From the description of Papers of Robert Frost [manuscript], 1890-1892. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809941

From the description of Papers of Robert Frost [manuscript], ca. 1933-1936. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809875

From the description of Forgeries of Robert Frost poems [manuscript], ante 1977. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647817637

From the description of Signature, n.d. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 32958424

From the description of Papers of Robert Frost, 1873-1981, and n.d. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 50298804

From the description of Derry Down Derry: sound recording, 1966 [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809710

From the description of To E.T. : autograph manuscript of the poem signed with initials, undated [ca. 1920]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270752833

From the description of Correspondence [19--?]. (Denver Public Library). WorldCat record id: 50732763

From the description of A boy's will [manuscript], 1913. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647976556

From the description of Collection of papers, 1915-1962. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 34491636

From the description of Mending Wall : autograph manuscript of the poem signed : place not specified, 1914 Mar. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270752837

Frost was an American poet.

From the description of Poems, 1950-1961. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122590102

From the description of Miscellaneous papers, 1915-1961. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612376745

From the guide to the Robert Frost miscellaneous papers, 1915-1961., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

From the guide to the Robert Frost poems, 1950-1961., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Robert Frost was an American poet. Frost's family moved to New England early in his life. After stints at Dartmouth College and Harvard University and a difficult period as a teacher and farmer, he moved to England and published his first collections, A Boys Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914). At the outbreak of war he returned to New England. He closely observed rural life and in his poetry endowed it with universal, even metaphysical, meaning using colloquial language, familiar rhythms, and common symbols to express both its pastoral ideals and its dark complexities.

From the description of Robert Frost collection, 1924-1974. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 298243936

Robert Lee Frost (1874-1963) is considered one of the foremost American poets of the twentieth century. Through his imagery of nature and life in rural New England, Frost explored fundamental questions about man's existence. He became America's favorite and most beloved poet, winning both popular and critical acclaim during his lifetime. Using deceptively simple language he combined the roles of farmer-poet and philosopher to create a memorable body of distinctly American poetry. In addition to winning the Pulitzer Prize four times and receiving countless other honors, Frost received a Congressional Gold Medal for his achievements and also participated in the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy in January, 1961.

From the description of Frost, Robert L. (Robert Lee), 1874-1963 (U.S. National Archives and Records Administration). naId: 10582628

Robert Frost (1874-1963) was an American poet and four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century.

From the guide to the Robert Frost Collection, 1925-1950, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

Poet and Library of Congress consultant in poetry (1958-1959).

From the description of Robert Frost papers, 1894-1965. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70981737

Poet.

From the description of Poems. Rich in stones, 1941. (University of Iowa Libraries). WorldCat record id: 233130887

Robert Frost was perhaps the most popular and beloved of 20th century American poets. He wrote of the character, people, and landscape of New England. Frost taught and lectured at several universities, including Amherst, Harvard, and the University of Michigan. Among Frost's volumes of poetry are NEW HAMPSHIRE (1923), WEST-RUNNING BROOK (1928), COLLECTED POEMS (1930), A FURTHER RANGE (1936), and A WITNESS TREE (1942).

From the description of Robert Frost collection, 1924-1977. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 63052222

Frost, American poet, was born in San Francisco on March 26, 1874. His father William Prescott Frost, a journalist, died of tuberculosis in 1885. At age eleven he moved with his mother Isabelle Moody Frost and sister Jeanie to Lawrence, Massachusetts. He graduated from Lawrence High School in 1892, sharing honors as class valedictorian with Elinor Miriam White, who later became his wife. Frost enrolled at Dartmouth College and later, in 1897, at Harvard, but never earned a formal academic degree. From 1900 to 1909 Frost raised poultry on a farm in Derry, New Hampshire, and taught at the local school, Pinkerton Academy. In August 1912 he moved the family to England. There he met and was influenced by Ezra Pound, Robert Graves, Rupert Brooke and Edward Thomas. In England he published A Boy's Will and shortly after that North of Boston, both of which soon came out in American editions. He returned to the United States in 1915. Frost resided in a succession of farms and houses in New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts (including Amherst). He frequently toured throughout the U.S. and in many foreign countries to do readings and to take up poet-in-residence appointments at a number of colleges and universities, including Amherst College. Frost died in Boston on January 29, 1963.

From the description of Frost collection, 1892-1978. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 52034237

Robert Frost, the American poet, was born in San Francisco on March 26, 1874. His father, William Prescott Frost, a journalist, died of tuberculosis in 1885. At age eleven he moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts with his mother Isabelle Moody Frost and sister Jeanie. He graduated from Lawrence High School in 1892, sharing honors as class valedictorian with Elinor Miriam White, who later became his wife. Frost enrolled at Dartmouth College and later, in 1897, at Harvard, but never earned a formal academic degree. After dropping out of college, he was a teacher, cobbler, editor and farmer. Frost's first published poem, "My Butterfly: An Elegy," appeared on November 8, 1894, in the New York newspaper The Independent . He and Elinor White were married in 1895. Through the next dozen years six children were born, two of whom died prematurely, leaving a surviving family of one son and three daughters: Carol, Lesley, Irma, and Marjorie.

From 1900 to 1909 Frost raised poultry on a farm in Derry, New Hampshire, and taught at the local school, Pinkerton Academy. In August 1912, he sold the property (newly owned) and moved the family to England, determined to establish himself in poetry in a country he thought was more receptive to his work. In England, he met and was influenced by Ezra Pound, Robert Graves, Rupert Brooke and Edward Thomas. Pound, in particular, was a supporter of Frost's work. In England he published A Boy's Will (1913) and shortly after that North of Boston (1914), both of which then came out in American editions. When he sailed back to the United States with his family in 1915, Frost's literary reputation was established.

A lecture he gave at the College in 1916 marked the beginning of a long relationship with the Amherst. (For a chronology, see "Robert Frost and Amherst College," below.)

By the 1920s Frost had become one of America's most celebrated poets. Each new book of poems ( Mountain Interval (1916), New Hampshire (1923), West-Running Brook (1928), A Further Range (1936), A Witness Tree (1942), Steeple Bush (1947), and In the Clearing (1962)) met with unprecedented commercial sales and critical praise, including four Pulitzer Prizes. Frost resided in a succession of farms and houses in New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts (including Amherst). He frequently toured throughout the U.S. and in many foreign countries to do readings and to take up poet-in-residence appointments at a number of colleges and universities. His reading of the poem "The Gift Outright" at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy in 1961 was a memorable occasion.

Robert Frost died in Boston on January 29, 1963.

For a detailed chronology of Robert Frost's life, see Collected Poems, Prose and Plays by Robert Frost (N.Y.: Library of America, 1995).

  • 1916: First college readings: lectured at Amherst College April 8.
  • 1917 - 1920 : Professor of English.
  • 1917 - 1918 : Taught Advanced Composition
  • 1918 - 1919 : taught American Authors
  • 1919 - 1920 : taught American Literature-19th Century Poets; Advanced Composition
  • 1918: Awarded honorary M.A. by Amherst, May 2. This was the first honorary degree awarded Frost by any college or university.
  • 1923 - 1925 : Professor of English.
  • 1923 - 1924 : Taught Readings in English Literature
  • 1924 - 1925 : Taught Readings in Poetry, Drama, Essay and Short Story; Advanced Writing
  • 1926: John Woodruff Simpson Lecturer (in residence for two weeks in January)
  • 1926 - 1938 : Professor of English on the John Woodruff Simpson Foundation endowment.
  • Held informal classes and readings and worked individually with students and teachers.
  • 1931: "Education by Poetry" published in Amherst Graduates Quarterly.
  • 1938: Memorial service held in Johnson Chapel on April 22 for Elinor Frost, who had died in Florida on March 20.
  • 1948: Awarded honorary Litt.D. by Amherst on June 20.
  • 1948: "Speaking of Loyalty" published in Amherst Graduates Quarterly.
  • 1949 - 1963 : Simpson Lecturer in Literature.Spent several weeks in Amherst each fall and spring, meeting with students and faculty and holding public readings.
  • 1954: 80th birthday celebration at Amherst College, March 26.
  • 1962: September: Amherst announces its new library to be named for Frost, who is present at the announcement.
  • 1962: Frost's last public appearance at Amherst (Parent's Day readings), October 20.
  • 1963: Robert Frost dies in Cambridge, Massachusetts, January 29.
  • 1963: Convocation for President John F. Kennedy and groundbreaking for the Robert Frost Library, October 26.
  • 1965: Dedication of the Robert Frost Library, October 24.

From the guide to the Robert Frost Collection, 1887-2008, 1920-1963, (Amherst College Archives and Special Collections)

Lawrence H. Conrad (1898-1982) received a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. While at the University, he met visiting fellows Robert Frost and Vachel Lindsay and helped with their local arrangements. He also acted in a play written by Frost, A Way Out . Later, Conrad served as president of the Michigan Author's Association and arranged readings for the poets. In 1924, Conrad published a novel entitled Temper . He taught Rhetoric at the University of Michigan from 1923 to 1928, then led the English Department at the John Burroughs School in St. Louis, MO, from 1928 to 1930. Conrad served as an English professor at the New Jersey State Teachers College in Montclair (later renamed Montclair State University) from 1930 to 1963, where he focused on American literature and creative writing. In 1967, he took a position at the University for San Diego, where he worked until 1970 in the Educational Development Center. Conrad published several nonfiction books including Descriptive and Narrative Writing (1927) and Teaching Creative Writing (1937). He had two sons, Lawrence, Jr. and David, with his wife Roberta. Roberta died in 1955, and in 1960, Conrad married Marjorie Matthews, with whom he lived until his death in 1982.

Robert Frost (1874-1963), the American poet, was born in San Francisco on March 26, 1874. His father, William Prescott Frost, a journalist, died of tuberculosis in 1885. At age eleven he moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts with his mother Isabelle Moody Frost and sister Jeanie. He graduated from Lawrence High School in 1892, sharing honors as class valedictorian with Elinor Miriam White, who later became his wife. Frost enrolled at Dartmouth College and later, in 1897, at Harvard, but never earned a formal academic degree. After dropping out of college, he was a teacher, cobbler, editor and farmer. Frost's first published poem, "My Butterfly: An Elegy," appeared on November 8, 1894, in the New York newspaper The Independent. He and Elinor White were married in 1895. Through the next dozen years six children were born, two of whom died prematurely, leaving a surviving family of one son and three daughters: Carol, Lesley, Irma, and Marjorie.

From 1900 to 1909 Frost raised poultry on a farm in Derry, New Hampshire, and taught at the local school, Pinkerton Academy. In August 1912, he sold the property (newly owned) and moved the family to England, determined to establish himself in poetry in a country he thought was more receptive to his work. In England, he met and was influenced by Ezra Pound, Robert Graves, Rupert Brooke and Edward Thomas. Pound, in particular, was a supporter of Frost's work. In England he published A Boy's Will (1913) and shortly after that North of Boston (1914), both of which then came out in American editions. When he sailed back to the United States with his family in 1915, Frost's literary reputation was established.

A lecture he gave at the College in 1916 marked the beginning of a long relationship with the Amherst.

By the 1920s Frost had become one of America's most celebrated poets. Each new book of poems ( Mountain Interval (1916), New Hampshire (1923), West-Running Brook (1928), A Further Range (1936), A Witness Tree (1942), Steeple Bush (1947), and In the Clearing (1962)) met with unprecedented commercial sales and critical praise, including four Pulitzer Prizes. Frost resided in a succession of farms and houses in New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts (including Amherst). He frequently toured throughout the U.S. and in many foreign countries to do readings and to take up poet-in-residence appointments at a number of colleges and universities. His reading of the poem "The Gift Outright" at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy in 1961 was a memorable occasion.

Robert Frost died in Boston on January 29, 1963.

(Nicholas) Vachel Lindsay (1879-1931) was born in Springfield, IL, in a house previously owned by Abraham Lincoln's sister-in-law and which the president had visited several times. He was exceptionally proud of this connection to Lincoln and wrote several poems about Lincoln. Lindsay attended Hiram College and later the Chicago Art Institute. When his attempts to find employment as a visual artist failed, Lindsay created illustrated pamphlets of his poetry and traveled around the Midwest, reciting his poems or trading his pamphlets in exchange for food and lodging. As his popularity grew, he took to performing his poetry, which he sang or chanted, in theaters or meeting halls. His two most well-known poems were "General William Booth Enters Heaven" and "The Congo," and he published several volumes of his poetry between 1913 and the 1920s. In 1915, he wrote a book entitled The Art of The Moving Picture, which has been called the first book of film criticism. Lindsay married Elizabeth Conner in 1925 and she gave birth to a daughter and a son within the next two years. He grew depressed as his popularity and ability to find work waned at the end of the 1920s, and on December 5, 1931 he killed himself by drinking a bottle of lye.

From the guide to the Lawrence H. Conrad Vachel Lindsay and Robert Frost Collection MA. 01014., 1928-1934, 1918-1966, (Amherst College Archives and Special Collections)

Poet.

Robert Lee Frost was born on March 26, 1874, in San Francisco, California. He died on January 29, 1963 in Boston, Massachusetts. Frost was an American poet who was much admired for his depictions of the rural life of New England, his command of American colloquial speech, and his realistic verse portraying ordinary people in everyday situations.

From the description of Letters, 1953. (Florida State University). WorldCat record id: 50677199

From the guide to the Robert Frost papers, 1910-1968, 1920-1955, (Literature and Rare Books)

Robert Frost (1874-1963) was one of America's leading 20th century poets, and a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Frost attended Harvard College from 1897 to 1899. In the ten years following his departure from Harvard, he wrote poems, operated a farm in Derry, New Hampshire, and taught at Pinkerton Academy. In 1912, he sold his farm and took his family to England, to devote himself to writing. A Boy's Will was published in 1913, followed by North of Boston in 1914. The Frosts moved back to the United States in February 1915, following the U.S. publication of North of Boston . His third book, Mountain Interval, was published in 1916. In 1924, Robert Frost received the Pulitzer Prize in poetry for New Hampshire. He was honored with the award three more times, for Collected Poems (1931), A Further Range (1937), and A Witness Tree (1943). Some of his most well known poems include: "The Death of the Hired Man" (from North of Boston ), "The Road Not Taken" and "Birches" (from Mountain Interval ), and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" (from New Hampshire ).

Frost held a number of academic positions throughout his life as well. He was a Professor of English at Amherst College in 1917-1920, 1923-1925, and 1926-1938, as well as Simpson Lecturer in Literature in 1949-1963. Frost was also a fellow at Michigan, Yale, Harvard, and Dartmouth.

From the guide to the Robert Frost Book Collection, 1913-1971, 1929-1962, (Literature and Rare Books)

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