Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975

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Correspondence to Lewis Mumford from Lionel Trilling and his wife, Diana Trilling.

From the description of Letters, 1970-1976, to Lewis Mumford. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 155876900

Professor.

From the description of Reminiscences of Lionel Trilling: oral history, 1968. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 122394116

Lionel Trilling was a successful author, educator, and scholar, but his greatest distinction is as a literary critic. Influential and persuasive, his criticism connected literature with life in a way that made sense. His elegant prose, gifted insight, and remarkable personal knowledge made him one of the most important critics of the 20th century and gave his observations a unique cultural relevance.

From the description of Lionel Trilling letter to Professor Griffin, 1962 Jan. 30. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 71790550

From the description of Lionel Trilling letter to Louis Untermeyer, 1955 Feb. 19. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 55506777

Lionel Trilling was an intellectual force in the New York literary and political scene throughout much of the 20th Century. A prolific writer, Trilling published literary criticism and cultural commentaries in journals such as The Nation, Commentary, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, and The Menorah Journal. Some of these publications were created by Trilling's colleagues, a group of left-leaning, Anti-Stalinist critics and theorists the New York Intellectuals like Daniel Bell, Irving Howe, Alfred Kazin, and Sidney Hook. These individuals were predominantly Jewish men who established themselves as a kind of "American Bloomsbury" to quote Columbia University professor of journalism Nicholas Lemann. Outside of his writing, Trilling was a popular and respected professor of English Literature at Columbia University. Together, with historian Jacques Barzun, Trilling helped to establish some of the core interdisciplinary classes that were vital to the growth and development of Columbia as a competitive academic environment.

Lionel M. Trilling was born on July 4, 1905 in New York City to businessman David W. Trilling and his wife Fannie (neé Cohen). As a child, Trilling attended DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx where he was a colleague of Countee Cullen. At school Trilling participated as a member of the Book Review Squad, the Reporters Squad, and president of Papyrus. He also wrote for the school publication, Magpie as well as co-authored a class play. In 1921 Lionel Trilling entered Columbia University, an institution that was to be his intellectual home for the rest of his life. Trilling graduated from Columbia with his A.B. in 1925 and his M.A. in 1926. For the next eleven years Trilling worked toward a doctorate in English Literature. However, this path was interrupted by work. He did not complete the Ph.D. until 1938.

Trilling left New York to be an Instructor of English at the University of Wisconsin from 1926 to 1927. Upon his return, Trilling began to date a recent Radcliffe graduate named Diana Rubin. Rubin was also a New Yorker, having been brought up in Manhattan. She briefly worked with her mother, Cecelia, as an interior designer while she pursued a career as a classical singer. Illness forced Rubin to abandon that goal. She and Lionel married on October 25, 1929.

A couple of years later, Trilling began teaching at Columbia University. His initial position was as an instructor and in 1939 he was made an assistant professor. From 1939 until 1944 he held this position and was promoted in 1944 to associate professor. Trilling was the first Jewish professor in the department to receive tenure. Throughout his career, Trilling was extremely involved with his undergraduate students. Along with his colleague and close friend, Jacques Barzun, Trilling reinstated a series of interdisciplinary or "general education" courses. With Barzun, Trilling taught a portion of the course entitled, Colloquium on Important Books, in which he covered cultural history and criticism of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1969, Trilling was given the title of University Professor, a post he held until his retirement from teaching in 1975.

Although he was an active faculty member, Trilling published quite regularly. His dissertation, "Matthew Arnold", was published a year after he completed the degree. This was followed by another study, "E.M. Forster" in 1943. Other publications include a novel, "The Middle of the Journey" (1949), several volumes of short stories; the most well-known of these is "Of This Time, Of That Place" (1940). However, Trilling is best known for his collections of critical essays, in particular "The Liberal Imagination" (1950), "The Opposing Self" (1955), and "Beyond Culture" (1965). Trilling was interested in Sigmund Freud as a cultural icon as well as using Freudian psychology in the analysis of literature. Two books that focused on these themes were "Freud and the Crisis of Our Culture" (1955) and "The Life and Work of Sigmund Freud" (1962). Please note that Trilling's writings encompassed decades of work and that countless bibliographies have been attempted and often abandoned due to the sheer size of his oeuvre.

Trilling did not spend all of his time strictly at Columbia. He was a founder, with John Crowe Ransom and F.O. Matthiessen, of the Kenyon School of Letters, now referred to as The School of Letters, Indiana University. Beginning in 1951 as a summer program, the school expanded to a full-year program in 1961, with a focus on literary theory and criticism. Information concerning The School of Letters may be found in the Indiana University School of Letters Director's Records finding aid located in the Indiana University Archives.

Throughout his life, Lionel Trilling maintained a high level of professional achievement and this was reflected in the many academic accolades he received. He served as the George Eastman Visiting Professor at Oxford University from 1964-1965. There, Trilling lectured at the university and other academic and intellectual institutions as well as taught classes. He was accompanied by Diana Trilling who, by this time, had firmly established herself as a serious literary and cultural critic and penned for a variety of journals, including "Partisan Review", "The New York Times Book Review", "Redbook", "The Nation", "The New Leader", and "McCall's". She had also recently published a book entitled, "Claremont Essays". They were joined by their son, James Lionel Trilling. He was born in 1949 and at that point was a student at Exeter.

Four years later, Trilling was the Charles Eliot Norton Visiting Professor at Harvard University. In addition to these two positions, he held honorary doctorates from Trinity College in Hartford Connecticut (1955), Harvard University (1962), Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland Ohio (1968), Northwestern University (1963), Leicester University (1973), Brandeis University (1974) and Yale University (1974). Trilling was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Medal from Brandeis University in 1968 and gave the first annual Jefferson Lecture for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in 1972. He was a Guggenheim Fellow from 1948 to 1949 and received a second grant that he was unable to use in 1975.

While he was active in his field, Trilling was a member of the Modern Language Association, the American Committee for Cultural Freedom of which both he and Diana Trilling resigned once the organization redirected its mission, The National Institute of Arts and Letters, and The American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

As the 1960s unfolded, student unrest grew on American campuses, in particular Kent State and Columbia University. Although Trilling was teaching at that time, he, like most members of the faculty, was unaware of the growing dissatisfaction among the students and the community of Harlem. Always considered a driving force behind New York intellectualism, he would later be criticized for never publicly recognizing the importance of the social movements that occurred during the decade as well as the racial components that were driving the majority of them.

Upon his retirement from Columbia, Trilling was awarded the title of Professor Emeritus. Shortly after, he was taken ill with a fast moving form of cancer that had progressed undetected for too long. By November of that year, he had died. Diana Trilling published a twelve-volume set of his writings from 1977 to 1979. She also wrote "The Beginning of the Journey: The Marriage of Diana and Lionel Trilling", a memoir of the first years of their life together. Diana Trilling died of cancer in October of 1996.

From the description of Lionel Trilling papers, 1899-1987. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 426030842

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Lionel Trilling was an intellectual force in the New York literary and political scene throughout much of the 20th Century. A prolific writer, Trilling published literary criticism and cultural commentaries in journals such as The Nation, Commentary, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, and The Menorah Journal. Some of these publications were created by Trilling's colleagues, a group of left-leaning, Anti-Stalinist critics and theorists the New York Intellectuals like Daniel Bell, Irving Howe, Alfred Kazin, and Sidney Hook. These individuals were predominantly Jewish men who established themselves as a kind of “American Bloomsbury” to quote Columbia University professor of journalism Nicholas Lemann. Outside of his writing, Trilling was a popular and respected professor of English Literature at Columbia University. Together, with historian Jacques Barzun, Trilling helped to establish some of the core interdisciplinary classes that were vital to the growth and development of Columbia as a competitive academic environment.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Lionel M. Trilling was born on July 4, 1905 in New York City to businessman David W. Trilling and his wife Fannie (neé Cohen). As a child, Trilling attended DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx where he was a colleague of Countee Cullen. At school Trilling participated as a member of the Book Review Squad, the Reporters Squad, and president of Papyrus. He also wrote for the school publication, Magpie as well as co-authored a class play. In 1921 Lionel Trilling entered Columbia University, an institution that was to be his intellectual home for the rest of his life. Trilling graduated from Columbia with his A.B. in 1925 and his M.A. in 1926. For the next eleven years Trilling worked toward a doctorate in English Literature. However, this path was interrupted by work. He did not complete the Ph.D. until 1938.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Trilling left New York to be an Instructor of English at the University of Wisconsin from 1926 to 1927. Upon his return, Trilling began to date a recent Radcliffe graduate named Diana Rubin. Rubin was also a New Yorker, having been brought up in Manhattan. She briefly worked with her mother, Cecelia, as an interior designer while she pursued a career as a classical singer. Illness forced Rubin to abandon that goal. She and Lionel married on October 25, 1929.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED A couple of years later, Trilling began teaching at Columbia University. His initial position was as an instructor and in 1939 he was made an assistant professor. From 1939 until 1944 he held this position and was promoted in 1944 to associate professor. Trilling was the first Jewish professor in the department to receive tenure. Throughout his career, Trilling was extremely involved with his undergraduate students. Along with his colleague and close friend, Jacques Barzun, Trilling reinstated a series of interdisciplinary or “general education” courses. With Barzun, Trilling taught a portion of the course entitled, Colloquium on Important Books, in which he covered cultural history and criticism of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1969, Trilling was given the title of University Professor, a post he held until his retirement from teaching in 1975.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Although he was an active faculty member, Trilling published quite regularly. His dissertation, Matthew Arnold, was published a year after he completed the degree. This was followed by another study, E.M. Forster in 1943. Other publications include a novel, The Middle of the Journey (1949), several volumes of short stories; the most well-known of these is Of This Time, Of That Place (1940). However, Trilling is best known for his collections of critical essays, in particular The Liberal Imagination (1950), The Opposing Self (1955), and Beyond Culture (1965). Trilling was interested in Sigmund Freud as a cultural icon as well as using Freudian psychology in the analysis of literature. Two books that focused on these themes were Freud and the Crisis of Our Culture (1955) and The Life and Work of Sigmund Freud (1962). Please note that Trilling's writings encompassed decades of work and that countless bibliographies have been attempted and often abandoned due to the sheer size of his oeuvre.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Trilling did not spend all of his time strictly at Columbia. He was a founder, with John Crowe Ransom and F.O. Matthiessen, of the Kenyon School of Letters, now referred to as The School of Letters, Indiana University. Beginning in 1951 as a summer program, the school expanded to a full-year program in 1961, with a focus on literary theory and criticism. Information concerning The School of Letters may be found in the Indiana University School of Letters Director's Records finding aid located in the Indiana University Archives.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Throughout his life, Lionel Trilling maintained a high level of professional achievement and this was reflected in the many academic accolades he received. He served as the George Eastman Visiting Professor at Oxford University from 1964-1965. There, Trilling lectured at the university and other academic and intellectual institutions as well as taught classes. He was accompanied by Diana Trilling who, by this time, had firmly established herself as a serious literary and cultural critic and penned for a variety of journals, including Partisan Review, The New York Times Book Review, Redbook, The Nation, The New Leader, and McCall's. She had also recently published a book entitled, Claremont Essays. They were joined by their son, James Lionel Trilling. He was born in 1949 and at that point was a student at Exeter.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Four years later, Trilling was the Charles Eliot Norton Visiting Professor at Harvard University. In addition to these two positions, he held honorary doctorates from Trinity College in Hartford Connecticut (1955), Harvard University (1962), Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland Ohio (1968), Northwestern University (1963), Leicester University (1973), Brandeis University (1974) and Yale University (1974). Trilling was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Medal from Brandeis University in 1968 and gave the first annual Jefferson Lecture for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in 1972. He was a Guggenheim Fellow from 1948 to 1949 and received a second grant that he was unable to use in 1975.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED While he was active in his field, Trilling was a member of the Modern Language Association, the American Committee for Cultural Freedom of which both he and Diana Trilling resigned once the organization redirected its mission, The National Institute of Arts and Letters, and The American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED As the 1960s unfolded, student unrest grew on American campuses, in particular Kent State and Columbia University. Although Trilling was teaching at that time, he, like most members of the faculty, was unaware of the growing dissatisfaction among the students and the community of Harlem. Always considered a driving force behind New York intellectualism, he would later be criticized for never publicly recognizing the importance of the social movements that occurred during the decade as well as the racial components that were driving the majority of them.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Upon his retirement from Columbia, Trilling was awarded the title of Professor Emeritus. Shortly after, he was taken ill with a fast moving form of cancer that had progressed undetected for too long. By November of that year, he had died. Diana Trilling published a twelve-volume set of his writings from 1977 to 1979. She also wrote The Beginning of the Journey: The Marriage of Diana and Lionel Trilling, a memoir of the first years of their life together. Diana Trilling died of cancer in October of 1996.

From the guide to the Lionel Trilling Papers, 1899-1987, (Columbia University, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, )

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Hoffman, Frederick John. Frederick John Hoffman papers, 1942-1955. University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, UWM Libraries
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. The novelist's position : manuscript, [1947]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Melville Cane Papers, 1901-1979. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
creatorOf West, Ray Benedict, 1908-1990. Ray B. West papers, 1920-1965. Utah State University, Merrill-Cazier Library
referencedIn Lowell-Adams House Printers papers, 1964-1972 (inclusive) 1964-1966 (bulk). Houghton Library.
referencedIn Lebowitz, Martin, 1921-1993. Martin Lebowitz papers, 1929-1996. Library of Congress
referencedIn Butcher, Philip, 1918-. Philip Butcher papers, ca.1890-1991. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Letter, 1943 Dec. 4, New York, to [Leo] Kirschbaum [St. Louis?] University of Michigan
referencedIn Schur, Max. Papers of Max Schur, 1923-1974. Library of Congress
referencedIn Jacques Barzun Papers, ca.1900-1999. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Halper, Nathan. Nathan Halper papers, 1923-1986. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Letters, 1970-1976, to Lewis Mumford. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
referencedIn Dorfman, Joseph, 1904-1991. Papers, 1890-1983. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Chase, Richard Volney, 1914-1962. Richard Volney Chase papers, ca.1930-1984. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Manuscripts and proofs of New Directions books, 1937-1997. Houghton Library.
creatorOf Kirschbaum, Leo, 1907-1962. Correspondence, 1942-1957. University of Michigan
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Reminiscences of Lionel Trilling: oral history, 1968. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Allen Ginsberg papers, 1943-1991, [Bulk Dates: 1945-1976] Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Ernst Kris Papers, 1893-1999, (bulk 1940-1956) Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
referencedIn Barzun, Jacques, 1907-. Jacques Barzun papers, ca.1900-1999. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Max Lerner papers, 1927-1998 Yale University. Department of Manuscripts and Archives
referencedIn Richard Volney Chase Papers, ca.1930-1984. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Milton Steinberg (1903-1950) Papers, undated, 1883-2003, 1923-1950 American Jewish Historical Society
referencedIn Sol Stein Papers, 1943-2004, [Bulk Dates: 1950-2004]. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Stein, Sol. Sol Stein Papers, 1943-2004 (Bulk Dates: 1950-2004). Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Lionel Trilling letter to Professor Griffin, 1962 Jan. 30. Pennsylvania State University Libraries
referencedIn Eric McKitrick Papers, 1934-2001. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Lionel Trilling letter to Louis Untermeyer, 1955 Feb. 19. Pennsylvania State University Libraries
referencedIn Alfred Chester Papers TXRC95-A2., 1950-1966 Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Lionel Trilling papers, 1899-1987. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn New Directions Publishing Corp. records, ca. 1933-1997. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Papers, 1920-1995. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Cane, Melville, 1879-1980. Melville Cane papers, 1901-1979. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn William Van O'Connor Papers, 1943-1967 Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries
referencedIn Berlioz, Hector, 1803-1869. Hector Berlioz papers, 1825-1994. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Speech, 1959 March 25. Dartmouth College Library
referencedIn Eliot, T. S. (Thomas Stearns), 1888-1965. Letters of T.S. Eliot [manuscript], 1932 and 1943. University of Virginia. Library
referencedIn Vanguard Press Records, ca.1925-ca.1985 Columbia University, Rare Book and Manuscripts Library,
referencedIn John Howard Griffin Papers, 1920-1980 Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn New Directions Publishing Corp. records, ca. 1933-1997. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Papers, 1947-2001. Houghton Library.
creatorOf Black, Robert K. (Robert Kerr). Tracy W. McGregor Library scrapbook / 1945-1950. University of Virginia. Library
creatorOf Lionel Trilling Papers, 1899-1987 Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel M. Theodore Edward Hook: his life and work. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn New Yorker records, ca.1924-1984 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
referencedIn Macdonald, Dwight. Dwight Macdonald papers, 1865-1984 (inclusive), 1920-1978 (bulk). Yale University Library
referencedIn Hagstrum, Jean H., 1913-1995. Jean Hagstrum Papers, 1921-1995. Northwestern University
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Letter toThomas O. Mabbott. New York, NY. 1958 Aug. 11. University of Iowa Libraries
creatorOf Taylor, Harold, 1914-1993. Harold Taylor Papers, 1938-1993. Sarah Lawrence College, Esther Raushenbush Library
creatorOf Chester, Alfred, 1928-1971. Papers, 1950-1966. Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Yaddo records, 1870-1980 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
referencedIn Nathan Halper Papers, 1923-1986. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
creatorOf Rubin, Jean, 1928-. Jean Rubin letters received, 1949-1963. Pennsylvania State University Libraries
creatorOf Arthos, John, 1908-. Correspondence, with American writers, 1947-1952. University of Michigan
creatorOf Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Records. Series VII., Other Department Files, 1916-1996 (bulk 1943-1969). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Records. Series V., Editor Files, 1873-1984 (bulk 1960-1980). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Quentin Anderson Papers, 1935-2003, [Bulk Dates: 1960-2000]. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Diana Trilling Papers, 1921-1996 Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Pascal Covici Correspondence TXRC96-A14., 1924-1966, (bulk 1938-1964) Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997. Allen Ginsberg papers, 1944-1991. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Lionel Trilling Seminars. Manuscripts, 1976-1996. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Kris, Ernst, 1900-1957. Ernst Kris papers, 1893-1999 (bulk 1940-1956). Library of Congress
referencedIn Trilling, Diana,. Diana Trilling papers, 1921-1996. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn McKitrick, Eric L. Eric L. McKitrick papers, 1934-2001. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn New York Times Company records. Arthur Hays Sulzberger papers, 1823-1999 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
referencedIn Leo Lerman Papers, 1893-2012, [Bulk Dates: 1937-1994] Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Schur, Max. Papers, 1923-1974. Library of Congress
referencedIn Leary, Lewis (Lewis Gaston), 1906-1990. Lewis Gaston Leary papers, 1920-1985 [manuscript]. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
creatorOf Burnshaw, Stanley, 1906-2005. Papers, 1927-1987, (bulk 1945-1987). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Max Schur Papers, 1923-1974 Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
referencedIn Griffin, John Howard, 1920-1980. John Howard Griffin papers, 1920-1980. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Lerner, Max, 1902-2001. Max Lerner papers, 1927-1992 (inclusive). Yale University Library
referencedIn Allen Ginsberg papers, 1937-1994 Stanford University. Libraries. Dept. of Special Collections and University Archives.
referencedIn Hays, Paul R. (Paul Raymond), 1903-1980. Paul R. Hays papers, ca.1910-1980. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Bracker, Jon, 1936-. Letters, 1965-1970. Indiana University
referencedIn Papers, 1917-1995 Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute
referencedIn Podhoretz, Norman. Norman Podhoretz papers, 1951-1982. Library of Congress
referencedIn Jacobson, Herbert L., 1915-. Herbert L. Jacobson letters, 1939-1975. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Sexton, Anne, 1928-1974. Bruce Berlind Collection, 1950-1981. Colgate University, Everett Needham Case Library
referencedIn Podhoretz, Norman. Typewritten letter signed, dated : New York, 24 February 1999, to Joan Peyser, 1999 Feb. 24. Pierpont Morgan Library.
referencedIn Dwight Macdonald papers, 1865-1984, 1920-1978 Yale University. Department of Manuscripts and Archives
referencedIn Vanguard Press. Vanguard Press Records, ca. 1925-ca. 1985. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Van Duyn, Mona. Papers, 1942-1985. Washington University in St. Louis, .
referencedIn Podhoretz, Norman. Papers, 1951-1982. Library of Congress
referencedIn Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997. Allen Ginsberg papers, 1937-1994. Stanford University. Department of Special Collections and University Archives
referencedIn Lerman, Leo, 1914-1994. Leo Lerman papers, 1893-1995 [Bulk Dates: 1937-1994]. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Faulkner, William, 1897-1962. Papers regarding Faulkner's work as Chairman of the Writers Committee of President Eisenhower's People-to People Program [manuscript], 1956-1969. University of Virginia. Library
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Letter, 1947 Dec. 16, New York, to John Arthos, Ann Arbor. University of Michigan
referencedIn Jacques Barzun's Collection of Hector Berlioz Records, 1825-1994 Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
creatorOf Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Records. : Series I., General Correspondence, 1922-1977 (bulk 1946-1966). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Sypher, Wylie. Wylie Sypher Papers, 1924-1986, 1953-1975. Simmons College, Beatley Library
referencedIn Simpson, Lewis P. Lewis P. Simpson papers, 1923-2004 (bulk 1980-2000). Louisiana State University, LSU Libraries
creatorOf Trilling, Lionel, 1905-1975. Letter to Florence Lipkin. New York, NY. 1933 Apr. 25. University of Iowa Libraries
creatorOf New York Psychoanalytic Institute. Pictorial collection, [ca. 1929-1980]. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Stanley Burnshaw Papers TXRC93-A78., 1927-1987, (bulk 1945-1987) Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Irvin Stock papers, 1882–2004 University of Delaware Library - Special Collections
referencedIn Novack, George Edward. George Edward Novack and Evelyn Reed papers, 1933-1992. Wisconsin Historical Society Archives
creatorOf Tate, Allen, 1899-1979. Hopwood Awards Collection, 1930- University of Michigan
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creatorOf Burke, Alberta H., 1907-1975. Alberta H. and Henry G. Burke papers and Jane Austen Research collection, 1811-1996. Goucher College, Goucher College Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Anderson, Quentin, 1912-2003. person
associatedWith Arthos, John, 1908- person
associatedWith Barzun, Jacques, 1907- person
associatedWith Berlioz, Hector, 1803-1869. person
associatedWith Bracker, Jon, 1936- person
associatedWith Burke, Alberta H., 1907-1975. person
associatedWith Burnshaw, Stanley, 1906- person
associatedWith Butcher, Philip, 1918- person
associatedWith Cane, Melville, 1879-1980. person
associatedWith Chase, Richard Volney, 1914-1962. person
associatedWith Chester, Alfred, 1928-1971 person
associatedWith Columbia University. corporateBody
associatedWith Covici, Pascal, 1888-1964 person
associatedWith di Mauro, Chet, person
associatedWith Dorfman, Joseph, 1904-1991. person
associatedWith Downer, Alan Seymour, 1912- person
associatedWith Eliot, T. S. (Thomas Stearns), 1888-1965. person
associatedWith Faulkner, William, 1897-1962. person
associatedWith Frost, Robert, 1874-1963 person
associatedWith Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997. person
associatedWith Griffin, John Howard, 1920-1980. person
associatedWith Griffin, William J., person
associatedWith Hagstrum, Jean H., 1913-1995 person
associatedWith Halper, Nathan. person
associatedWith Hays, Paul R. (Paul Raymond), 1903-1980. person
associatedWith Hoffman, Frederick John. person
associatedWith Jacobson, Herbert L., 1915- person
associatedWith Kirschbaum, Leo, 1907-1962. person
correspondedWith Kris, Ernst, 1900-1957. person
associatedWith Leary, Lewis (Lewis Gaston), 1906-1990. person
correspondedWith Lebowitz, Martin, 1921-1993. person
associatedWith Lerman, Leo, 1914-1994. person
associatedWith Lerner, Max, 1902- person
associatedWith Lerner, Max, 1902-2001. person
correspondedWith Levin, Harry, 1912-1994 person
associatedWith Lionel Trilling Seminars. corporateBody
associatedWith Lipkin, Florence, person
correspondedWith Lowell-Adams House Printers. corporateBody
associatedWith Mabbott, Thomas Ollive, 1898-1968, person
associatedWith Macdonald, Dwight. person
associatedWith MacDonald, Dwight. person
correspondedWith Marietta Tree person
correspondedWith McKitrick, Eric L. person
associatedWith New Directions Publishing Corp. corporateBody
correspondedWith New Yorker Magazine, Inc corporateBody
associatedWith New York Psychoanalytic Institute. corporateBody
associatedWith New York Times Company corporateBody
associatedWith Novack, George Edward. person
associatedWith O'Connor, William Van, 1915-1966 person
correspondedWith Podhoretz, Norman. person
correspondedWith Raditsa, Leo. person
associatedWith Ransom, John Crowe, 1888-1974. person
associatedWith Rubin, Jean, 1928- person
correspondedWith Schur, Max. person
correspondedWith Schur, Max. person
associatedWith Simpson, Lewis P. person
associatedWith Steinberg, Milton,1903-1950 person
associatedWith Stein, Sol. person
associatedWith Stein, Sol. person
correspondedWith Stock, Irvin, 1920- person
associatedWith Sypher, Wylie. person
associatedWith Taylor, Harold, 1914-1993. person
associatedWith Trilling, Diana. person
associatedWith Untermeyer, Louis, 1885-1977, person
associatedWith Van Doren, Mark, 1894-1972. person
correspondedWith Van Duyn, Mona. person
associatedWith Vanguard Press. corporateBody
associatedWith West, Ray Benedict, 1908-1990. person
associatedWith Yaddo (Artist's colony) corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
New York (State)--New York
United States
New York (State)--New York
Subject
Fiction--Criticism and interpretation--History--20th century
Criticism
College teachers as authors--New York (State)--New York
Student strikes
Student movements
College teachers--Interviews
Civil rights demonstrations
Editors--20th century
Criticism--United States
Authors, American--20th century
Critics--20th century--Correspondence
African--American Students
Literary quarrels
Universities and colleges--Administration
College teachers as authors
American literature--20th century
Critics--20th century
Occupation
Critic
College teachers
Function

Person

Birth 1905-07-04

Death 1975-11-05

Americans

English

Information

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