Gilman, Charlotte Perkins, 1860-1935

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1860-07-03
Death 1935-08-17
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

A socialist and deist, Gilman was an independent thinker, author, and speaker who was an intellectual leader of the women's movement from the late 1890s through the mid-1920s. For further information, see Notable American Women (1971).

From the description of Letter of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 1908. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 424455095

From the description of Poems of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 1898. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 543658120

From the description of Letters, 1887-1935 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122576703

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in 1860 in Hartford, Connecticut. In 1884 she married Charles Arthur Stetson and less than a year later gave birth to their only daughter. They separated in 1888, due to her depression. Gilman moved with her daughter to California where she became active in social reform and began writing and lecturing. Her most famous piece is The yellow wallpaper, written in 1890 and published in 1892. She published her first volume of poetry, In this our world, in 1893. She wrote short stories, poetry, drama and novels as well as non-fiction. In 1894, Gilman and Stetson officially divorced and she sent her daughter to live with Stetson and his new wife, a close friend of Gilman's, Grace Ellery Channing. Gilman eventually moved back east and married a cousin, Houghton Gilman, in 1900. They lived in New York City until 1922, at which point the couple moved back to Houghton's Connecticut homestead. Following his sudden death in 1934, Gilman moved back to California, where her daughter still resided. In 1932, Gilman was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer. An advocate of euthanasia for the terminally ill, she took her own life in 1935 by overdosing on chloroform.

From the description of Charlotte Perkins Gilman collection, 1880-2001. (University of New England). WorldCat record id: 765336343

Lecturer and author.

From the description of Papers of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 1914. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79450472

A socialist and deist, Gilman was an independent thinker, author, and lecturer who was an intellectual leader of the woman's movement from the late 1890s through the mid 1920s. For further information, see Notable American Women, 1607-1950 (1971).

From the description of Papers, 1894-1939 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232007989

From the description of Letters, 1884-1935 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122561867

A socialist and deist, Gilman was an independent thinker, author, and lecturer who was an intellectual leader of the woman's movement from the later 1890s through the mid 1920s. For further information, see Notable American Women, 1607-1950 (1971).

From the description of Papers, 1899-1992 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232008672

A socialist and deist, Charlotte Perkins Gilman was an independent thinker, author, and speaker who was an intellectual leader of the women's movement from the late 1890s through the mid-1920s. Born in Hartford, Connecticut, she was a great-granddaughter of Lyman Beecher. She grew up mainly in Providence, Rhode Island, and in 1884 married Charles Walter Stetson, an artist. They had one daughter, Katharine Stetson Chamberlin, and were divorced in 1894. In the 1890s Gilman lived in California. After her marriage (1900) to Houghton Gilman, a lawyer, and a cousin, she lived in New York City and then in Norwich, Connecticut. She died in Pasadena. For further information, see Notable American Women (1971).

From the description of Papers of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 1846-ca.1975 (inclusive), 1880-1940 (bulk). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 423615856

A socialist and deist, Gilman was an independent thinker, author, and speaker who was an intellectual leader of the women's movement from the late 1890s through the mid-1920s. For further information see Notable American Women (1971).

From the description of Papers, 1879-1906 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122521600

American author and feminist. Gilman showed early literary and artistic talents and as a young woman contributed to her family's income by teaching art and designing trade cards. Gilman began collaborating with her cousin, Robert Brown on trade cards for Kendall Manufacturing Company. Original sketches of her work are preserved with her papers at The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College.

From the description of Soap trade card collection, [between 1880 and 1884]. (University of Wisconsin - Madison, General Library System). WorldCat record id: 64696016

A socialist and deist, Gilman was an independent thinker, author, and speaker who was an intellectual leader of the women's movement from the late 1890s through the mid-1920s. An advocate of economic independence for women, Gilman considered the ballot of secondary importance. Her interests ranged from sensible dress for women, physical fitness, more rational domestic architecture, and professionalized housework, to birth control, Freud, and immigrants. Born in Hartford, Conn., she was a great-granddaughter of Lyman Beecher. She grew up mainly in Providence, R.I., and in 1884 married Charles Walter Stetson, an artist. They had one daughter, Katharine Stetson Chamberlin, and were divorced in 1894. In the 1890s Gilman lived in California. After her marriage (1900) to Houghton Gilman, a lawyer, and a cousin, she lived in New York City and then in Norwich, Conn. She died in Pasadena. For further information, see Notable American Women (1971).

From the description of Papers, 1846-1961 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122336316

American author and feminist. Gilman showed early literary and artistic talents and as a young woman contributed to her family's income by teaching art and designing trade cards. Gilman began collaborating with her cousin, Robert Brown on trade cards for Kendall Manufacturing Company.

From the description of [Soap trade cards designed by Charlotte Perkins Gilman], [ca. 1880-1884]. (San Diego State University Library). WorldCat record id: 228452071

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Subjects:

  • Women--Health and hygiene
  • Advertising cards--Specimens
  • American literature--20th century
  • Family records
  • Breast--Cancer--Patients
  • Advertising cards--19th century
  • Women--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Women's rights
  • American literature--19th century
  • Soap trade
  • Mothers and daughters
  • Feminists--Intellectual life
  • Child care
  • Feminism--History
  • Child rearing
  • Widows
  • Physical fitness for women
  • Advertising
  • Feminists
  • Clothing and dress--Physiological aspects
  • Courtship
  • Divorce
  • Authors
  • Birth control
  • Women authors
  • Women--Social conditions
  • Sex role
  • Social ethics
  • American literature--Women authors
  • Advertising--19th century
  • Economics
  • Soap trade--19th century

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Lecturers

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • Pasadena (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Rhode Island--Providence (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Boston (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)