Ives, Charles E., 1874-1954

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1874-10-20
Death 1954-05-19
US
English

Biographical notes:

The poem by Edwin Markham. Composed 1912. Arranged for voice and piano, 1921 and published as no. 11 of 114 songs. Quotations: The Battle Hymn of the Republic; Hail Columbia; The Red, White, and Blue; The Star-Spangled Banner; America; The Battle Cry of Freedom. Dedicated to Dr. David Cushman Twichell.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Lincoln, the great commoner / Charles Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52368029

Composer.

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, undated. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864050

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, 1935 Aug. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864251

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, undated. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864506

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, undated. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864452

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, 1934 May 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864220

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, 1949 Mar. 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864407

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, 1931 June 29. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864147

From the description of Charles Ives autograph letter to W. Riegger, 1937 Aug. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 387864322

Composed 1907.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Scherzo : All the way around and back / C.E. Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52368070

See Appendix 4: Chronology of Significant Events in Ives's Life .

From the guide to the The Music of Charles Ives, 1874-1983 (inclusive), (Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University)

Text for 1) The harvest dawn is near, by Rev. George Burgess, 2) Lord of the harvest, Thee we hail, by John Hampton [i.e. Hampden] Gurney, 3) Come, ye thankful people, come, by Rev. Henry Alford. No. 1 composed 1898; nos. 2 and 3 before 1902. First performance Central Presbyterian Church, New York, ca. 1900, when Ives was organist there. Second performance New York, 1948, Collegiate Chorale, Robert Shaw conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Harvest home / Charles Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52368202

This arrangement differs from Ives' version in Symphony no. 4 by deleting the organ and adding oboe, bassoon and trumpet. Original symphony version composed 1909-11. Used, in different version, in String Quartet no. 1, 1st movement (1896). First performance of this arrangement at New School for Social Research, New York, 27 May 1933, New Chamber Orchestra, Bernard Herrmann conductor. Quotations: Missionary Hymn; Coronation.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Fugue : (III movement of the 4th symphony) / Charles Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52368143

Words by Charles Ives. Alternative title: The Ruined River. Originally composed for chorus, 1911.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of The new river / Charles E. Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52368046

American composer and insurance executive.

From the description of The Charles Ives papers, 1874-1983 (inclusive). (Yale University). WorldCat record id: 702152855

Composed 1911. First performance San Francisco, 28 May 1933, New Music Society.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Hallowe'en / Charles E. Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52368019

Composed 1906. This work was first paired with another work and entitled: I.A Contemplation of a Serious Matter or The Unanswered Perennial Question, II. A Contemplation of Nothing Serious or Central Park in the Dark in 'The Good Old Summer Time.' Quotation: Violets.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Central Park in the dark / C.E. Ives. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 52367908

American composer.

From the description of [Robert Browning overture. Drafts] : autograph manuscript, 1911. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270566505

From the description of Autograph letter signed, dated : West Redding (Conn.), 11 August [n.y., 1930's?], to Henry [Cowell], 1930's. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270578550

Charles Edward Ives was born in Danbury, Connecticut on October 20, 1874, the first-born son of Mary Parmelee and George Edward Ives. The influences on him as a young musician were many and varied--European concert music, American nineteenth-century parlor music, ragtime, other vernacular and functional musics, sacred music, and his father's unusual interests in sounds. George Ives, being the town bandmaster and a well-trained musician, was the strongest influence on young Charlie; the father's favorite composers, among them Bach and Stephen Foster, became the son's inheritance. As a teenager, Ives was the youngest organist in the state and an excellent athlete. Charles was a freshman at Yale College when George Ives died in 1894. The Ives family, although an early and prominent one in New England, was unusual in its Emersonian interests and actions; ideas of transcendentalism and self-reliance were part of Ives's background. At Yale, Ives was not a good scholar, but he held the position of organist at Center Church in New Haven for four years, and he was already composing extraordinarily experimental music that he learned to keep away from his professor, Horatio Parker.

Realizing that he would not be able to support himself and a family with the kind of music he wanted to compose, Ives determined to make his living in business. He joined an insurance firm in New York City, met his future partner and lifelong friend, Julian Myrick, and soon applied his inventive mind to improvements and innovations in the business that eventually made him financially secure and had long-range benefits for his company, Mutual of New York, and for the insurance business as a whole. In 1908 Ives married Harmony Twichell, a nurse and daughter of a prominent minister, the Reverend Joseph Twichell, of Hartford. They devoted themselves thereafter to a life that encompassed two careers for Ives--the successful businessman and the iconoclast composer. Unable to have children of their own, the Iveses adopted a daughter, Edith, and the family lived comfortably in New York City and in a country home in West Redding, Connecticut. Along with his father's musical talents, Ives seemed to have inherited George Ives's weak heart, for in 1918 he suffered a serious attack that left him a semi-invalid and sapped his energies; his composing days were virtually over by 1920, and business activities were curtailed, ending with retirement in 1930. He died in New York on May 19, 1954.

Ives was a thinker and an inventor of ideas. He thought about music, about life, about music and life together, about the common man, about religion, about politics--and he invented new ways of expressing his thoughts in his music. Ives also was a writer, not as gifted in his literary efforts as in music, but with a bravura style and spirit that simulated his music writing. Ives's literary endeavors were also concerned with music and society, the dangers of war, the ugliness of politics, and the insurance business. During his healthy and creative years, Ives wrote and composed with passion and conviction. Considering that he worked only on weekends and evenings, Ives produced a substantial body of music and literature. His music is often termed "inclusive," in that he saw no reason to exclude any style so long as it served to express his ideas. The songs alone number over 200 and include a wide range--from traditional parlor songs to the most outrageously innovative experiments. The music manuscripts are in themselves unusual visual artifacts, often extremely complicated and at times indecipherable, a situation that has added to existing editorial and publication problems complicated by Ivesian traits such as multiple choices for performers, unusual instrumentation, multilayering, quarter-tones, etc. The availability of Ives's music today is due largely to the efforts of several younger musicians who "discovered" Ives in the twenties and thirties, among them Henry Cowell, Elliott Carter, Bernard Herrmann, Lehman Engel, Lou Harrison, Jerome Moross, and E. Robert Schmitz. Recognition of Ives came about gradually. Foremost among Ives enthusiasts was pianist John Kirkpatrick, who began to play the "Concord" Sonata in the late twenties, finally giving the first full public hearing of "Concord" in 1939, following ten years of study and practice. This occasion proved to be a turning point in Ives's career. Kirkpatrick's continuing dedication to Ives's music as performer and editor assured further recognition and publication. More recently, the Charles Ives Society has been responsible for guiding and assigning editions and re-editions of the music.

From the guide to the The Charles Ives Papers, 1874-1983 (inclusive), (Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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SNAC ID:
41191751

Subjects:

  • Composers--Correspondence
  • Orchestral music--Drafts and sketches
  • Songs (Medium voice) with string orchestra, Arranged--Parts
  • Music--Manuscripts
  • Scherzos (Piano, bassoon, clarinet, piccolo, trombones (3), trumpet, percussion)--Scores
  • Symphonies--Excerpts--Scores
  • Songs (High voice) with piano
  • Scherzos (Instrumental ensemble)--Scores
  • Symphonies--Scores.
  • Piano music
  • Music--United States--20th century.
  • Scherzos (Piano, clarinet, piccolo, saxophone, trombones (3), trumpet, percussion)--Scores
  • Chamber orchestra music
  • Songs (Medium voice) with chamber orchestra--Scores
  • Piano with string orchestra--Scores and parts
  • Suites (Orchestra)--Scores
  • Composers--Correspondence.
  • Insurance companies--United States.
  • Choruses, Secular (Mixed voices, 5 parts) with orchestra--Scores and parts
  • Songs (Medium voice) with orchestra--Parts
  • Sacred songs with piano
  • Orchestral music--Scores
  • Choruses, Secular (Mixed voices) with orchestra--Scores and parts
  • String orchestra music, Arranged--Scores and parts
  • Basset horn with chamber orchestra--Scores
  • Songs (Medium voice) with chamber orchestra--Scores and parts
  • Songs
  • Chamber orchestra music--Scores and parts
  • Music--Manuscripts--Facsimiles
  • Scherzos--Scores and parts
  • Choruses, Secular (Mixed voices, 4 parts) with instrumental ensemble--Scores and parts
  • Overtures--Drafts and sketches
  • Canons, fugues, etc. (Orchestra)--Scores and parts
  • Orchestral music--Scores and parts
  • Musical sketches
  • Choruses, Sacred (Mixed voices, 5 parts), Unaccompanied
  • Flute with chamber orchestra--Scores
  • Insurance--United States.
  • Choruses, Secular (Mixed voices) with orchestra--Scores
  • Insurance
  • Sonatas (Piano)
  • Choruses, Secular (Men's voices) with orchestra--Scores
  • Thanksgiving Day--Songs and music
  • Instrumental ensembles--Scores and parts
  • Symphonies--Scores
  • Symphonies--Excerpts--Scores and parts
  • English horn with chamber orchestra--Scores
  • Carols, English
  • Music--20th century
  • Songs.
  • Insurance companies

Occupations:

  • Composers.
  • Collector

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)