Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 1819-1914

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In 1819, Sickles was born in New York City to Susan Marsh Sickles and George Garrett Sickles, a patent lawyer and politician. (His year of birth is sometimes given as 1825, and Sickles was known to have claimed as such. Historians speculate that Sickles chose to appear younger when he married a woman half his age.) He learned the printer's trade and studied at the University of the City of New York (now New York University). He studied law in the office of Benjamin Butler, was admitted to the bar in 1846, and was elected as a member of the New York State Assembly (New York Co.) in 1847.

On September 27, 1852, Sickles married Teresa Bagioli against the wishes of both families—he was 32, she about 15 or 16. She was reported as sophisticated for her age, speaking five languages.

In 1853 Sickles became corporation counsel of New York City, but resigned soon afterward when appointed as secretary of the U.S. legation in London, under James Buchanan, by appointment of President Franklin Pierce. In 1855 he returned to the United States, and in 1856 he was elected as a member of the New York State Senate in the 3rd D. He was re-elected to the seat in 1857. In 1856 he was also elected as a Democrat to the 35th U. S. Congress, and held office from March 4, 1857, to March 3, 1861, a total of two terms.

Sickles was censured by the New York State Assembly for escorting a known prostitute, Fanny White, into its chambers. He also reportedly took her to England, while leaving his pregnant wife at home. He presented White to Queen Victoria, using as her alias the surname of a New York political opponent.

On February 27, 1859, in Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House, Sickles shot and killed Philip Barton Key II, the district attorney of the District of Columbia and the son of Francis Scott Key. Sickles had discovered that Philip Key was having an affair with his young wife.

Sickles surrendered at Attorney General Jeremiah Black's house, a few blocks away on Franklin Square, and confessed to the murder. After a visit to his home, accompanied by a constable, Sickles was taken to jail. He received numerous perquisites, including being allowed to retain his personal weapon, and receive numerous visitors. So many visitors came that he was granted the use of the head jailer's apartment to receive them. They included many congressmen, senators, and other leading members of Washington society. President James Buchanan sent Sickles a personal note.

Harper's Magazine reported that the visits of his wife's mother and her clergyman were painful for Sickles. Both told him that Teresa was distracted with grief, shame, and sorrow, and that the loss of her wedding ring (which Sickles had taken on visiting his home) was more than Teresa could bear.

Sickles was charged with murder. He secured several leading politicians as defense attorneys, among them Edwin M. Stanton, later to become Secretary of War, and Chief Counsel James T. Brady who, like Sickles, was associated with Tammany Hall. Sickles pleaded temporary insanity—the first use of this defense in the United States. Before the jury, Stanton argued that Sickles had been driven insane by his wife's infidelity, and thus was out of his mind when he shot Key. The papers soon trumpeted that Sickles was a hero for "saving all the ladies of Washington from this rogue named Key".

Sickles had obtained a graphic confession from Teresa; it was ruled inadmissible in court, but, was leaked by him to the press and printed in the newspapers in full. The defense strategy ensured that the trial was the main topic of conversations in Washington for weeks, and the extensive coverage of national papers was sympathetic to Sickles. In the courtroom, the strategy brought drama, controversy, and, ultimately, an acquittal for Sickles.

Sickles publicly forgave Teresa, and "withdrew" briefly from public life, although he did not resign from Congress. The public was apparently more outraged by Sickles's forgiveness and reconciliation with his wife than by the murder and his unorthodox acquittal.

In the 1850s, Sickles had received a commission in the 12th Regiment of the New York Militia, and had attained the rank of major. (He insisted on wearing his militia uniform for ceremonial occasions while serving in London, and caused a minor diplomatic scandal by snubbing Queen Victoria at an Independence Day celebration.)

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Sickles worked to repair his public image by raising volunteer units in New York for the Union Army. Because of his previous military experience and political connections, he was appointed colonel of one (the 70th New York Infantry) of the four regiments he organized. He was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers in September 1861, where he was notorious before beginning any fighting.

According to author Garry Boulard's Daniel Sickles: A Life, Sickles not only refused to return runaway slaves who escaped to his Union camp in Northern Virginia, he put many of them on the federal payroll as servants, while also training male slaves to be soldiers. It was a policy that won for him the approval of the influential Committee on the Conduct of the War.

In March 1862, he was forced to relinquish his command when the U.S. Congress refused to confirm his commission. He lobbied his Washington political contacts and reclaimed both his rank and his command on May 24, 1862, in time to rejoin the Army in the Peninsula Campaign. Because of this interruption, Sickles missed his brigade's significant actions at the Battle of Williamsburg. Despite his lack of previous combat experience, he did a competent job commanding the "Excelsior Brigade" of the Army of the Potomac in the Battle of Seven Pines and the Seven Days Battles. He was absent for the Second Battle of Bull Run, having used his political influences to obtain leave to go to New York City to recruit new troops. He also missed the Battle of Antietam because the III Corps, to which he was assigned as a division commander, was stationed on the lower Potomac, protecting the capital.

Sickles was a close ally of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, his original division commander, who eventually commanded the Army of the Potomac. Both men had notorious reputations as political climbers and as hard-drinking ladies' men. "Accounts at the time compared their army headquarters to a rowdy bar and bordello."

Sickles' division was in reserve at the Battle of Fredericksburg. On January 16, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Sickles for promotion to the grade of major general to rank from November 29, 1862. Although the U.S. Senate did not confirm the promotion until March 9, 1863, and the President did not formally appoint Sickles until March 11, 1863, Hooker, now commanding the Army of the Potomac, gave Sickles command of the III Corps in February 1863.

This decision was controversial as Sickles became the only corps commander without a West Point military education. His energy and ability were conspicuous in the Battle of Chancellorsville. He aggressively recommended pursuing troops he saw in his sector on May 2, 1863. Sickles thought the Confederates were retreating, but these turned out to be elements of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's corps, stealthily marching around the Union flank. He also vigorously opposed Hooker's orders moving him off good defensive terrain in Hazel Grove. In both of these cases, it is easy to imagine the disastrous battle turning out very differently for the Union if Hooker had heeded his advice.

— Charles Hanna

The Battle of Gettysburg was the occasion of the most famous incident and the effective end of Sickles' military career. On July 2, 1863, Army of the Potomac commander Maj. Gen. George G. Meade ordered Sickles' corps to take up defensive positions on the southern end of Cemetery Ridge, anchored in the north to the II Corps and to the south, the hill known as Little Round Top. Sickles was unhappy to see the "Peach Orchard," a slightly higher terrain feature, to his front. He violated orders by marching his corps almost a mile in front of Cemetery Ridge. This had two effects: it greatly diluted the concentrated defensive posture of his corps by stretching it too thin, and it created a salient that could be bombarded and attacked from multiple sides. About this time (3 p.m.), Meade called a meeting of his corps commanders. Sickles did not appear. An aide to Brig. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren soon reported the situation. Meade and Warren rode to Sickles' position, where Meade demanded an explanation from the general. Meade refused Sickles' offer to withdraw because he realized it was too late and the Confederates would soon attack, putting a retreating force in even greater peril.

The Confederates attacked at about the time the meeting finished and Meade returned to his headquarters. The Confederate assault by Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's corps, primarily by the division of Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws, smashed the III Corps and rendered it useless for further combat. Gettysburg campaign historian Edwin B. Coddington assigns "much of the blame for the near disaster" in the center of the Union line to Sickles. Stephen W. Sears wrote that "Dan Sickles, in not obeying Meade's explicit orders, risked both his Third Corps and the army's defensive plan on July 2. However, Sickles' maneuver has recently been credited by John Keegan with blunting the whole Confederate offensive that was intended to cause the collapse of the Union line. Similarly, James M. McPherson wrote that "Sickles's unwise move may have unwittingly foiled Lee's hopes."

During the height of the Confederate attack, Sickles was wounded by a cannonball that mangled his right leg. He was carried by a detail of soldiers to the shade of the Trostle farmhouse, where a saddle strap was applied as a tourniquet. He ordered his aide, Major Harry Tremain, "Tell General Birney he must take command." As Sickles was carried by stretcher to the III Corps hospital on the Taneytown Road, he attempted to raise his soldiers' spirits by grinning and puffing on a cigar along the way. His leg was amputated that afternoon. He insisted on being transported to Washington, D.C., which he reached on July 4, 1863. He brought some of the first news of the great Union victory, and started a public relations campaign to defend his behavior in the conflict. On the afternoon of July 5, President Lincoln and his son, Tad, visited General Sickles, as he was recovering in Washington.

Sickles had recent knowledge of a new directive from the Army Surgeon General to collect and forward "specimens of morbid anatomy ... together with projectiles and foreign bodies removed" to the newly founded Army Medical Museum in Washington, D.C. He preserved the bones from his leg and donated them to the museum in a small coffin-shaped box, along with a visiting card marked, "With the compliments of Major General D.E.S." For several years thereafter, he reportedly visited the limb on the anniversary of the amputation. The museum, now known as the National Museum of Health and Medicine, still displays this artifact. (Other Civil War-era specimens of note on display include the hip of General Henry Barnum.)

Sickles ran a vicious campaign against General Meade's character after the Civil War. Sickles felt that Meade had wronged him at Gettysburg and that credit for winning the battle belonged to him. In anonymous newspaper articles and in testimony before a congressional committee, Sickles maintained that Meade had secretly planned to retreat from Gettysburg on the first day. While his movement away from Cemetery Ridge may have violated orders, Sickles always asserted that it was the correct move because it disrupted the Confederate attack, redirecting its thrust, and effectively shielding the Union's real objectives, Cemetery Ridge and Cemetery Hill. Sickles's redeployment took Confederate commanders by surprise, and historians have argued about its ramifications ever since.

Sickles eventually received the Medal of Honor for his actions, although it took him 34 years to get it. The official citation accompanying his medal recorded that Sickles "displayed most conspicuous gallantry on the field, vigorously contesting the advance of the enemy and continuing to encourage his troops after being himself severely wounded."

Despite his one-legged disability, Sickles remained in the army until the end of the war and was disgusted that Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant would not allow him to return to a combat command. In 1867, he received appointments as brevet brigadier general and major general in the regular army for his services at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, respectively.

Soon after the close of the Civil War, in 1865, he was sent on a confidential mission to Colombia (the "special mission to the South American Republics") to secure its compliance with a treaty agreement of 1846 permitting the United States to convey troops across the Isthmus of Panama. From 1865 to 1867, he commanded the Department of South Carolina, the Department of the Carolinas, the Department of the South, and the Second Military District. Sickles pursued reconstruction on a basis of fair treatment for African-Americans and respect for the rights of employees. He halted foreclosures on property. He also made the wages of farm laborers the first lien on crops. He outlawed discrimination against African-Americans and banned the production of whisky.

In 1866, he was appointed colonel of the 42nd U.S. Infantry (Veteran Reserve Corps), and in 1869 he was retired with the rank of major general.

Sickles served as U.S. Minister to Spain from 1869 to 1874, after the Senate failed to confirm Henry Shelton Sanford to the post, and took part in the negotiations growing out of the Virginius Affair. His inaccurate and emotional messages to Washington promoted war, until he was overruled by Secretary of State Hamilton Fish and the war scare died out.

In his Daniel Sickles: A Life Garry Boulard points out that Sickles was disadvantaged throughout the Virginius controversy, trying to negotiate with a Spanish leadership that was frequently disorganized and chaotic, while the substantial talks were taking place in Washington between Fish and Spanish Minister Don Jose Polo de Barnabe. Even so, when Sickles subsequently decided to turn in his resignation, Fish, who was not displeased with Sickles' service, wired the General: "You are recalled on your own request."

Sickles maintained his reputation as a ladies' man in the Spanish royal court and was rumored to have had an affair with the deposed Queen Isabella II. Following the death of Teresa in 1867, in 1871 he married Carmina Creagh, the daughter of Chevalier de Creagh of Madrid, a Spanish Councillor of State. They had two children.

Sickles was appointed as president of the New York State Board of Civil Service Commissioners from 1888 to 1889, Sheriff of New York County in 1890. He was elected again as a representative in the 53rd Congress, serving from 1893 to 1895. For most of his postwar life, he was the chairman of the New York Monuments Commission, but he was forced out when $27,000 was found to have been embezzled.

He had an important part in efforts to preserve the Gettysburg Battlefield, sponsoring legislation to form the Gettysburg National Military Park, buy up private lands, and erect monuments. He procured the original fencing used on East Cemetery Hill to mark the park's borders. This fencing came directly from Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C.

Of the principal senior generals who fought at Gettysburg, virtually all, with the conspicuous exception of Sickles, have been memorialized with statues. When asked why there was no memorial to him, Sickles supposedly said, "The entire battlefield is a memorial to Dan Sickles." The monument to the New York Excelsior Brigade was originally commissioned to include a bust of Sickles, but it includes a figure of an eagle instead.

Sickles lived out the remainder of his life in New York City, dying on May 3, 1914 at the age of 94. His funeral was held at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan on May 8, 1914. He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
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referencedIn 1866 - Sickles, Daniel E - File No. S1002 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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creatorOf Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 1819-1914. Letters, 1856-1911. New York State Library
referencedIn 1866 - Sickles, Daniel E - File No. P425 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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referencedIn 1866 - Sickles, Daniel E - File No. S1121 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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referencedIn Congressional Medal of Honor File of Major General Daniel E. Sickles, U.S. Volunteers United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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referencedIn Compiled Military Service Record of Colonel Daniel E. Sickles, 70th New York Infantry Regiment United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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referencedIn 1866 - Sickles, Daniel E - File No. S1203 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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referencedIn Sickles, Daniel E. -- Major General United States. National Archives and Records Administration
creatorOf Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 1819-1914. Letter : New York, to an unknown general, n.p., 1893 Mar. 26. University of Chicago Library
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creatorOf Daniel Edgar Sickles Papers, 1821-1918 Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
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referencedIn 1865 - Sickles, Daniel E - File No. W2289 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
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referencedIn Letters Received by General Daniel E. Sickles, 1861 - 1863 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
creatorOf Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 1819-1914. Letter : New York, to an unknown general, n.p., 1893 Mar. 26. Texas Christian University
referencedIn William Hobart Royce papers, 1941-1943 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
referencedIn File Unit: 1867 - Sickles, Daniel E - File No. M766 United States. National Archives and Records Administration
referencedIn Manigault, Charles Izard, 1795-1874. Book containing loose papers, 1776-1872, ca. 1872. South Carolina Historical Society, SCHS
creatorOf Paris, Louis-Philippe-Albert d'Orléans, comte de, 1838-1894. ALS, 1875 June - 1894 July 20 : various places. Copley Press, J S Copley Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Aldrich, Thomas M. person
associatedWith Angle, Clarence B. person
associatedWith Ayres, Romeyn Beck. person
associatedWith Barlow, Della, 1840-1870. person
associatedWith Barton, William Eleazar, 1861-1930, person
associatedWith Belmont, August, 1813-1890. person
associatedWith Bowers, Theodore Shelton, 1832-1866. person
associatedWith Buchanan, James, 1791-1868. person
associatedWith Buchanan, James, 1791-1868. person
associatedWith Burwell, William M. (William MacCreary), 1809-1888. person
associatedWith Butler-Gunsaulus Collection (University of Chicago. Library) corporateBody
associatedWith Butler, William Allen, 1825-1902. person
associatedWith Carrington family family
associatedWith Carrington family. family
associatedWith Carrington family. family
associatedWith Carr, Joseph Bradford, 1828-1895, person
associatedWith Clark, Gardner B., b. ca. 1835 person
correspondedWith Comstock, C. B. (Cyrus Ballou), 1831-1910. person
associatedWith Crawford, Laura Jones, b. ca. 1837. person
associatedWith Cullum, George W. (George Washington), 1809-1892 person
correspondedWith Daly, Augustin, 1838-1899 person
associatedWith Dauchy, John P., 1837-1869. person
associatedWith Dearborn, Frederick M. (Frederick Myers), b. 1876 person
associatedWith De Peyster, J. Watts (John Watts), 1821-1907 person
correspondedWith Elliot, Charles N. (Charles Nathan), b. 1873. person
associatedWith Erie Railway. corporateBody
associatedWith Farnsworth, A. D., person
associatedWith Field, David Dudley, 1805-1894 person
correspondedWith Fish, Hamilton, 1808-1893. person
associatedWith Forbes, W. Cameron (William Cameron), 1870-1959 person
associatedWith Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885. person
correspondedWith Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885. person
correspondedWith Grant, U. S. (Ulysses S.), 1881-1968 person
associatedWith Grimball, John Berkley, 1800-1893. person
correspondedWith Hamilton, Park, 1808-1893 person
associatedWith Harris, Ira, 1802-1875. person
associatedWith Hay, John, 1838-1905. person
associatedWith Henshaw, Samuel, 1852-1941 person
associatedWith Hill, David Bennett, 1843-1910 person
associatedWith Hincks, Elizabeth P., b. ca. 1842. person
associatedWith Huger, Benjamin, 1805-1877. person
correspondedWith Irving, Henry, Sir, 1838-1905, person
associatedWith Key, Philip Barton, 1818-1859. person
correspondedWith King, Horatio, 1811-1897. person
correspondedWith King, Horatio C. (Horatio Collins), 1837-1918 person
associatedWith Leigh, David. person
associatedWith Lockwood, Philip Case, 1844-1897 person
associatedWith Longstreet, James, 1821-1904. person
associatedWith Manigault, Charles Izard, 1795-1874. person
associatedWith Manning, James N. person
correspondedWith McKinley, William, 1843-1901 person
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associatedWith Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Commandery of the State of Massachusetts, collector. corporateBody
associatedWith Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Minnesota Commandery. corporateBody
associatedWith Morgan, Edwin D. (Edwin Denison), 1811-1883. person
correspondedWith Morrill, Lot M. (Lot Myrick), 1812-1883. person
leaderOf New York (N.Y. : County). Sheriff. corporateBody
associatedWith New York (State). Governor. corporateBody
memberOf New York (State). Legislature. Senate corporateBody
associatedWith New York (State). Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg and Chattanooga. corporateBody
associatedWith New York State Soldier's and Sailor's Home. corporateBody
alumnusOrAlumnaOf New York University corporateBody
associatedWith Paris, Louis-Philippe-Albert d'Orléans, comte de, 1838-1894. person
associatedWith Rives, William C. (William Cabell), 1793-1868. person
associatedWith Rives, William C. (William Cabell), 1793-1868. person
correspondedWith Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 person
correspondedWith Root, Elihu, 1845-1937 person
associatedWith Royce, William Hobart, 1878-1963. person
associatedWith Royce, William Hobart, b. 1878 person
associatedWith Sanders, George N. (George Nicholas), 1848-1890 person
associatedWith Scanlan, Michael, person
associatedWith Schaefler, Sam, 1920-, person
correspondedWith Sickles, George Garrett, person
correspondedWith Sickles, George Stanton, person
associatedWith Sickles, Teresa person
associatedWith Sickles, Teresa. person
associatedWith Sneden, Robert Knox, 1832-1918. person
associatedWith Stedman, Edmund Clarence, 1833-1908. person
correspondedWith Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874 person
associatedWith Swanberg, W. A., 1907- person
associatedWith Tammany Hall. corporateBody
associatedWith Tate, George, 1840-1912. person
correspondedWith Trowbridge, J. T. (John Townsend), 1827-1916 person
associatedWith Tylee, John W. L., 1837-1900. person
associatedWith United States. Army corporateBody
leaderOf United States. Army. Infantry Regiment, 42nd. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Army. Military District, 2nd. corporateBody
leaderOf United States. Army. New York Infantry Regiment, 70th (1861-1864) corporateBody
leaderOf United States. Army of the Potomac. Corps, 3rd corporateBody
memberOf United States. Army. Veterans Reserve Corps. corporateBody
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associatedWith Waddell, Charlotte Augusta Southwick, d.1891. person
associatedWith Waddell, Coventry person
correspondedWith Washburne, E. B. (Elihu Benjamin), 1816-1887. person
associatedWith Weaver, William A. (William Augustus), 1797-1846. person
associatedWith Wetmore, D. W., person
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correspondedWith Young, John Russell, 1840-1899. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Kingdom of Spain 00 ES
Greater London ENG GB
New York City NY US
New York City NY US
South Carolina SC US
District of Columbia DC US
Gettysburg PA US
Virginia VA US
Subject
Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, Pa., 1863--Monuments--Dedication services
Murder
Peninsula Campaign, 1862
Veterans--Societies and clubs
Legislators
Foreign relations
Chancellorsville, Battle of, Chancellorsville, Va., 1863
Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, Pa., 1863
Democratic Party
Tammany Hall
Civil War, 1861-1865
Reconstruction--1865-1877
Medal of Honor
Authors and publishers
Gettysburg Campaign, 1863
United States. Congress. House
Seven Days' Battles, Va., 1862
Veterans--Law and legislation
Fredericksburg, Battle of, Fredericksburg, Va., 1862
Governor
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
Imperialism
Occupation
Politicans
Generals
Diplomats
Murderers
Soldiers--19 century.--United States
Lawyers
Representatives, U.S. Congress--New York (State)
Army officers
Function

Person

Birth 1819-10-20

Death 1914-05-03

Male

Americans

English

Information

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