Princeton university. Library

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The Princeton University Library, consisting of the main Harvey S. Firestone Memorial Library and 13 special libraries in locations around campus, is one of the world's most distinguished research libraries. Since its founding in 1750, the Library's collections have grown to include more than 6.2 million books, 6.3 million microforms, 36,000 linear feet of manuscripts, and impressive holdings of rare books, prints and archives.

The origins of the Princeton University Library can be traced back to a donation from the personal library of Colonial governor Jonathan Belcher in 1750. In the intervening years the continual growth of the library has necessitated its move to a series of new homes. After the 1802 fire in Nassau Hall, what remained of the library was moved to Stanhope Hall. Here it remained until 1860 when it was transferred back to Nassau Hall, moving again in 1873 when the college's first dedicated library building, Chancellor Green Library, was completed. This space was soon outgrown however, and a second library building, Pyne Library, was built in 1877. Finally in 1948, the Harvey S. Firestone Memorial Library was completed, which has been the University Library's main home ever since. The University's first librarian was Frederic Vinton, brought from the Library of Congress in 1873 by President McCosh. His successors have all been involved in national library affairs, and Firestone itself was one of the first modern open-stack research libraries in America.

From the description of Library records, 1810-2005. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 74214591

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba, V, 1966-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Labor in Argentina, 1989-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Bolivia, I, 1982-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Arts and Culture in Brazil, 1962-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Industry and Infrastructure in Venezuela, I, 1992-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba, VI, 1944-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Urban Issues in Brazil, 1975-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Brazil, 1981-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Peru, IV, 1976-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human Rights in Argentina, III, 1978-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba, IV, 1929-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Alternative Press from Venezuela, I, 1998-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Chile, II, 1967-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba III, 1947-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Brazil, 1940-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, 1955-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women and Gender Issues in Latin America, 1932-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women and Gender Issues in Bolivia, II, 1991-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Health and Society in Bolivia, 1986-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Argentina, I, 1985-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Agrarian Issues in Peru, III, 1920-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Armed Conflict and Human Rights in Colombia, 1973-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Peru, I, 1993-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Brazilian Poetry: Pamphlets I, 1948-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Chile, V, 1989-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics and Elections in Uruguay, I, 1984-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Argentina, 1985-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the The Catholic Church in Cuba, 1996-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Cuba: The Catholic Church, 1904-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Children & Youth in Venezuela, I, 1992-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Mexico I, 1851-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Augusto Pinochet Ugarte Case, 1998-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the HIV/AIDS in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Latin America, 1988-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the The Catholic Church in Cuba, IV, 1988-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Brazilian Literature and Criticism: Pamphlets I, 1916-1991, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human and Civil Rights in Bolivia, 1981-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Argentina, V: Pamphlets, 1982-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Minorities in Peru, 1982-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Bolivia, I, 1985-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, III, 1953-2009, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, II, 1961-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Peru, I, 1931-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Mexico, 1993-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Catholic Church in Cuba, III, 1995-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Ecuador, 1977-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Youth in Chile, II, 1988-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Argentina, VII, 1993-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Argentina, II, 1943-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Peoples in Chile, 1970-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay and lesbian issues in Chile, I, 1991-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Perú, 1871-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women and Children in Brazil, II, 1983-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Rural and Agrarian Issues in Brazil, 1971-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Brazil, I, 1899-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Mexico, II, 1926-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Issues in Ecuador, 1983-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Peru, III, 1986-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Youth and Children in Peru, 1994-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-Christian Religious and Spiritual Organizations in Cuba, 1913-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay and Lesbian Issues in Latin America, 1963-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Chile I, 1968-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Uruguay, II, 1914-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human Rights in Peru, II, 1978-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Cuba: Protestant Churches in Cuba, 1926-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Socioeconomic Crisis and Political Participation in Argentina, I, 1995-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Children and Youth in Bolivia, I, 1986-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Brazilian “Literatura de Cordel”, 1970s-1990s, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Agrarian Issues in Bolivia, I, 1989-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Economy, Industry, and Trade in Brazil, I, 1954-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Health in Peru, 1991-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Venezuela, I, 1978-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Chile, II, 1992-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Colombia, I, 1962-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Economic Development and Conditions in Peru, III, 1987-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Peoples, Peasants, and Ethnic Minorities in Bolivia, I, 1970-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Argentina, VI, 1989-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Ecuador, 1987-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Chile, IV: Pamphlets, 1985-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Cuban Protestant Serials II, 1979-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Guatemala, II, 1913-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Central America, I, 1960-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Labor in Brazil, 1980-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba II, 1941-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Mexican Elections 1997, 1990-1997, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Cuba: Non-Christians and General Publications, 1972-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson(1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized,they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection(Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Brazil, I, 1975-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Fraternal Organizations in Cuba, 1954-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Peter Riga, ca. 1140-1209. [Aurora, sive Biblia versificata]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Martyrologium]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Cofradía de San Nicolás de Tolentino (Sacapulas, Guatemala). Account book of the Cofradía de San Nicolás de Tolentino in Sacapulas, Guatemala, 166[4] April 4-1857 Aug. 29. Newberry Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Correspondence to Arthur H. Lea, 1910. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Congregatio Concilii. Vota S. Congre[gatio]ne Concilij Emin[entissi]mi Praefecti : anno 1689 p[er] totum annum 1691 : manuscript, [169-?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Missal, [between 1350 and 1375]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Rice, Howard C. (Howard Crosby), 1904-1980. Howard C. Rice collection on the Rittenhouse orrery, 1943-1954. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872,. [Matthew with Glossa ordinaria]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Evangelia IV]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Luther, Martin, 1483-1546. [Autograph letter signed : Wittenberg, to John [the Steadfast], Elector of Saxony, 1525 July 27]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Buschke, Albrecht. The E.B. Cook chess collection ... Princeton University Library
referencedIn Nahum Sabsay papers, 1924-1969. Houghton Library
referencedIn Princeton University. Bicentennial Celebration Committees. Bicentennial Celebration records, 1944-1947. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. [Ejemplos, discursos y vidas de santos]. Newberry Library
referencedIn Department of Grounds and Buildings Technical Correspondence Records, 1866-1988, 1930s-1940s Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections.Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library. Princeton University Archives.
creatorOf Ruskin, John, 1819-1900,. Antiphonary single leaf, [between 1325 and 1350]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Kanter, Gustav,. [Sermones, oraciones en lengua poconchi]. Newberry Library
referencedIn Rollins, Philip Ashton. Junius Spencer Morgan, A.B. '88 ; A.M. '96 : tribute : typescript, 1932. Pierpont Morgan Library.
creatorOf Labor in Argentina, 1989-2002 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
referencedIn Lytle, R. Ridgley, 1891-1980. R. Ridgley Lytle World War I collection, 1915-1916. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Horologium, [17--]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Rice, Howard C. (Howard Crosby), 1904-1980. Howard C. Rice correspondence with Alexander D. Wainwright collection, 1950-1980. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. Deed for sale of land : Naples, [949] Princeton University Library
creatorOf Hasslong, Baron von. Piano progettato di pace da farsi con le note : manuscript, [1743?]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Packard, William A. (William Alfred), 1830-1909. William A. Packard collection, 1857-1878. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Noyes, Alfred, 1880-1958. Alfred Noyes collection, 1903-1936 Princeton University Library
creatorOf Università di Padova. [Diploma delivered by the University of Padua to Girolamo Maschi, Doctor of Laws]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. Legal document : Grottaferrata, [between 1100 and 1150]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Music anthology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Inglis, J. C.,. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University Library. [Matrimoniali]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Nicholas, of Lyra, ca. 1270-1349. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Beethoven, Ludwig van, 1770-1827. [Sketches for Sonata, Opus 106]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants, [between 1775 and 1825]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Wagner, Richard, 1813-1883. [Das Rheingold]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Cantata 33, Allein zu dir Herr Jesu Christ]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. [Miscellany]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Curia Romana. Miscellany : manuscript, [between 1641 and 1699]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. [Breve dell'Arte degli Albergatori in Siena]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Indigenous Peoples, Peasants, and Ethnic Minorities in Bolivia, I, 1970-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Scheide, John Hinsdale, 1875-1942. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Melanchthon, Philipp, 1497-1560. [Autograph letter signed, philippus : to Johann Agricola, 15--?] Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Library records, 1810-2005. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Church Materials from Mexico, II, 1926-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospel of John and other texts : manuscript, [15--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Apostolic epistles : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Women and Children in Brazil, II, 1983-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Venice (Republic : To 1797). [Capitulare consiliariae Venetiarum sexterij Canaregij]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Liturgical miscellany, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Scheide, John Hinsdale, 1875-1942,. [Accounts of household expenses from the Monastery of Steinheim]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. [Statuta et regesta Collis Scipionis]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Mexican Elections 1997, 1990-1997 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Women in Central America, I, 1960-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Es ist ein trotzig und verzagt ding]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf William Reese Company,. New Spain account book, 1576-1590. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bambi, Giovanni Gaspare. Esempi di santi della nova legge di grazia : manuscript, [16--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Psalter, [ca. 1300]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Hieromonachos, Arsenios,. Proskynetarion : manuscript, 1693. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Book of Hours; Use of Rouen]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Papers, 1846-1948 (inclusive), 1918-1939 (bulk). Houghton Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Cantata, BWV 168]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Kelley, Maurice, 1903-. Selected papers of Maurice Kelley, 1935-1971. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Religion in Cuba: The Catholic Church, 1904-1998 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Armed Conflict and Human Rights in Colombia, 1973-2007 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Bambi, Giovanni Gaspare. [Esempi di santi della nova legge di grazia]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872,. Vita profezie, miracoli, e morte del B. Brandano : detto volgarmente il Pazzo di Giesù Christo : cavata dell'Archivio della Bicchierna di Siena. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gay and Lesbian Issues in Latin America, 1963-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Papadopoulos, Demetrios. Music anthology : manuscript, [1822]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Women and Gender Issues in Latin America, 1932-1998 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
referencedIn Mary Hyde Eccles papers Houghton Library
creatorOf Watson, William Scott, 1862-1944,. [Music anthology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Theological miscellany, [16--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Environment and Ecology in Peru, I, 1993-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Psalter]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Tum, Miguel. [Frases] en castellano y en lengua [quiché]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Children and Youth in Bolivia, I, 1986-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants and other texts, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospels of Mark and other texts : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Rouen, [ca. 1490]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Pius II, Pope, 1405-1464. [Aeneas Siluius in Europam]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Prayer book, [between 1500 and 1525]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872,. [Psalter and canticles]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Lampadarios, Petros. Music anthology : manuscript, [1868]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Du Perron, Jacques Davy, 1556-1618. Discorso fatto per parte della camera eccl[essiast]i[c]a in quella del Terzo Stato sopra l'articolo del giuramento : manuscript, [16--?] / da Monsignore il Cardinale di Perrona Archepiscopo di Sans Primate delle Gallie, e di Germania, e grande elemosiniere di Francia. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Horologium fragment, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Paris, [ca. 1480]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Smithtown Library. Records, 1828-1988, 1907-1988 (bulk) Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Lando, Agostino. [Petition of Agostino, Alesandro, and Girolamo Lando, brothers of Verona to Doge Ludovico Manin of Venice]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Gradual]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gentili, Antonio-Saverio, 1681-1753,. Le raggioni di stato con li suoi documenti politici : manuscript, [between 1850 and 1899]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Shaʻrānī, ʻAbd al-Wahhāb ibn Aḥmad, ca. 1493-1565 or 6. Kashf al-ḥijāb wa-al-rān ʻan wajh asʼilat al-Jān [microform]. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Orthodox Eastern Church. [Gospel lectionary]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Logan, James, 1674-1751. At a council held at Edward [unreadable] 1712 May 19. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Thorp, Willard, 1899-1990. Willard Thorp papers, 1886-1981 (1930-1970). Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. British literary manuscripts from Princeton University, [18th century] [microform]. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Health in Peru, 1991-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Theological treatises, [16-- to 18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Women and Gender Issues in Bolivia, II, 1991-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. [Rifugio delle vedove]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf William, of Malmesbury, ca. 1090-1143. [Gesta Regum Anglorum]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Spagnolo, Segovia. [Tractatus de sacramento poenitentiae]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Charles VIII, King of France, 1470-1498. Letter signed : Naples, to unnamed cardinals, 1495 Apr. 26. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library. Historical Subject Files collection, 1746-2005. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939. Ernest Cushing Richardson collection, 1832-1954 (bulk 1875-1935) Princeton University Library
creatorOf James I, King of England, 1566-1625. [Letters patent : Dorsetshire, to Henry Hastings, et al., 1618 July 21]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Anaphora of the Virgin Mary, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Greek music anthology : manuscript, [between 1831 and 1835]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Beethoven, Ludwig van, 1770-1827. [Six leaves of miscellaneous sketches for opus 106. Four conjugate leaves of sketches for opus 106. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Scheide, John Hinsdale, 1875-1942,. [Gospel book]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Human and Civil Rights in Bolivia, 1981-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Cantata 118, O Jesu Christ, mein's lebens licht]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gentili, Antonio-Saverio, 1681-1753,. [Discorso istorico sopra l'origine e progressi della regalia]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Viana, Francisco de, d. 1609. [Sermones en poconchi]. Newberry Library
referencedIn Cone, Edward T. Fanfare, [1939?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [16--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Rome, [between 1475 and 1499]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Health and Society in Bolivia, 1986-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Maidstone, Richard, d. 1396. [Sermones]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gregory I, Pope, ca. 540-604. [Dialogorum libri IV]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Socioeconomic Crisis and Political Participation in Argentina, I, 1995-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Beethoven, Ludwig van, 1770-1827. [Sketches for Sonata, Opus 106]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. [Index rerum et materium in libris Statutorum et Ordinum civitatis Venetiarum contentarum]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Psalter and Litany]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Anaphora of the Virgin Mary, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Anaphora of the Apostle John and other texts, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Rome, [ca. 1450]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Fraternal Organizations in Cuba, 1954-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Balbi, Giovanni, d. 1298. [Catholicon]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Eugene IV, Pope, 1383-1447. Autograph letter signed : Rome, to Filippo and Andre de Perodoles of Ferrara, 1446 May 12. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Rice, Howard C. (Howard Crosby), 1904-1980. Howard C. Rice correspondence with Alexander D. Wainwright, 1950-1980. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Ethiopic psalter fragment : manuscript, [16--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Montecassino (Monastery). Monastic formulary : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gazeley, Robert. [Indenture for a messuage : Higham, Suffolk, to Robert de Hovedene, 1328 or 29 Jan. 5]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gay and lesbian issues in Chile, I, 1991-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants, [15--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Mena, Pablo. [Medicina maya]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. Bocabulario en lengua quiche y castellana : tomo primero. Newberry Library
creatorOf Nābulusī, ʻAbd al-Ghanī ibn Ismāʻīl, 1641-1731. Sharh Qasīdah Mudarīyah [microform]. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Politics in Chile I, 1968-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Scheide, William Taylor, 1847-1907. [Gospel book]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Altoviti, Giacomo, 1604-1693. De vescovi assistenti, loro privileggi, perogativo, e servizio nelle publiche funzioni appresso il Papa / di Monsig[no]r Giacomo Altoviti Patriarca di Antiochia. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Rome, [ca. 1500]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Vico, Domingo de, d. 1555. [Theologia indorum de Lemoa en quiché]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Kaloudēs, Arsenios, d. 1693,. Proskynetarion : manuscript, 1693. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Ibn Abī al-Dunyā, ʻAbd Allāh ibn Muḥammad, 823-894. Kitāb al-ʻaẓamah [microform] / Abū Bakr ibn ʻAbd Allāh ibn Muḥammad ʻUbayd ibn Shaʻbān ibn Abī al-Dunyā. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Malaxos, Manouēl, d. 1581. Nomokanōn eis haplēn phrasin Manouēl Malaxou : manuscript, [between 1600 and 1625]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Fibonacci, Leonardo, ca. 1170-ca. 1240. [Practica geometriae]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [18--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Lampadarios, Petros. Music anthology : manuscript, [between 1800 and 1805]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Miscellaneous papal documents, 1672-1851. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Protestant Churches in Cuba, V, 1966-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospels of John : manuscript, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Ellis, John Henry, 1840-1912,. [John with Glossa ordinaria]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Guild of Pharmacologists (Venice, Italy). [Certificate issued by the Guild of Pharmacologists, Venice to Francisco Stagagnoni to exercise the art of pharmacology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Agrarian Issues in Bolivia, I, 1989-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Gradual fragment]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Spagnolo, Segovia. Tractatus de sacramento poenitentiae : manuscript, [1783?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. [Capitolario di ordini de carte di bereteri de questa cita de Venetia et leze statuite in diversi tempi]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. Tractatus de legibus : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Book of Hours]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Children & Youth in Venezuela, I, 1992-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Religion in Brazil, I, 1899-2002 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Hymns and prayers]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Reichardt, H. C.,. The book of Enoch : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872,. Vita profezie, miracoli, e morte del B. Brandano : detto volgarmente il Pazzo di Giesù Christo : cavata dell'Archivio della Bicchierna di Siena : manuscript, [18--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Correspondence to Van Wyck Brooks, 1943-1961. University of Pennsylvania Library
creatorOf Guild of Pharmacologists (Venice, Italy). [Certificate issued by the Guild of Pharmacologists, Venice to Antonio Comin to establish himself as a druggist]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bek, Antony, ca. 1240-1311,. [Statutes of the Realm]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Collection of twenty-one medieval works on astronomy [microform] / Sacro Bosco, Thebit, Messahala, Robertus Anglicus, etc. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Augustine, Saint, Bishop of Hippo. [Contra Iulianum]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. Códice de Calkiní. Newberry Library
creatorOf Schubert, Franz, 1797-1828. [Die Sterne]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [16--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Università di Padova. [Diploma delivered by the University of Padua to Titian de Bortoli, Doctor of philosophy and medicine]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Scheide, John Hinsdale, 1875-1942,. [Gospel book]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Musical commonplace book compiled and written by Heinrich Nicolaus Gerber. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Environment and Ecology in Chile, II, 1992-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Lill, Hans,. [Pentateuch in the Syro-Hexapla version]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Scroll of Esther]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Scheide, John Hinsdale, 1875-1942,. Hōgen Monogatari ; Heiji Monogatari. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, 1955-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Malyus, Thomas. Indenture for a messuage of 120 acres : Mogerhanger, Charlton and Blownham, to John Andrews and William Wilson, 1495 June 24. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Urban Issues in Brazil, 1975-2006 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Rosenthal, Bernard M.,. [Rosarium Theologiae]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Wycliffe, John, d. 1384. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Lampadarios, Petros. [Music anthology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Orthodox Eastern Church. Sticherarion : manuscript, [between 1622 and 1699]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Ibn al-Imām, d. ca. 1595. Tuḥfat al-anām fī faḍāʼil al-Shām [microform] Indiana University
creatorOf Beethoven, Ludwig van, 1770-1827. [Sketchbook for the year 1815]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. [Prattica generale p[er] le confessioni]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Church Materials from Mexico I, 1851-1999 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf J., F. [Religious autobiographical work]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Book of hours : for Sarum Use]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Ḥamīdī, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Aḥmad, d. 1596. al-Durr al-munaẓẓam fī madḥ al-Nabī al-Aʻẓam [microform]. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Women in Argentina, VII, 1993-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Protestant Churches in Cuba, IV, 1929-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Breviary]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Rural and Agrarian Issues in Brazil, 1971-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Cuban Protestant Serials II, 1979-1999 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf González de Santella, Thyrsus, 1624-1705. [Document signed by Thyrsus González de Santella, father-general of the Society of Jesus]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Longo, Maria D. J. T. (Maria Deodata Josepha Theresia). [Vow of Stability taken by Maria Deodata Josepha Theresia Longo, of Venice]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Kane, Grenville, 1854-1943,. Gospels of John : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospels of Mark and John and other texts : manuscript, [16--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Liturgical miscellany, [1721-1730]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Religion in Perú, 1871-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Two drawings from model books]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Barrera, Francisco. [Vocabulario castellano-quiché : preguntas de la doctrina christiana, confesionario]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Ibn al-Khabbāz al-Mawṣilī, Aḥmad ibn al-Ḥusayn (d. ca. 1240). Kitāb al-Nihāyah fī sharḥ al-Kifāyah / min imlā' Shams al-Dīn Abī al-ʻAbbās Aḥmad ibn al-Ḥusayn ibn Aḥmad al-Nahwī al-Mawṣilī al-maʻrūf bi-Ibn al-Khabbāz. Indiana University
referencedIn Seymour, William, 1855-1833,. William Seymour collection, 1848-1890 and 1990s. Duxbury Rural and Historical Society
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Geert Grote, [ca. 1500]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [15--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Curia Romana. [Miscellany]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Psalter-hours, [between 1450 and 1475]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Saz, Antonio del, fl. 1662. [Sermones y marial en la lengua quiché]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Liturgical miscellany, [19--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Politics in Argentina, II, 1943-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872,. [Luke with Glossa ordinaria]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Chronicle of Biblical history]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Henríquez, Andrés. Explanations of the Passion of Jesus Christ in Quiché, 1803 March 26. Newberry Library
creatorOf Scheide, William H. (William Hurd), 1914-. [Extracts from Heinrich Suso, Peter Damian, & PS. Bernard]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Theological treatise on the incarnation and other subjects, [18--]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Inventory of the Everette B. Long Papers Ragan MSS 00080., 1949-1981 Cushing Memorial Library,
creatorOf Università di Roma. [Diploma delivered by the University of Rome to Francisco Pieratti, Doctor of surgery]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Manuscript of the records of the original surveys of Elizabeth, N.J. [microform] : signed by all parties in interest 1729 to replace the original records destroyed at that time. Elizabeth, 1729-1788. New York Public Library System, NYPL
creatorOf Religion in Cuba: Non-Christians and General Publications, 1972-1998 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Brölemann, Henri-Auguste, 1775-1854,. [Old French romances]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Riveiro, Tomás. Explicación de la doctrina christiana en lengua quiché. Newberry Library
creatorOf Du Perron, Jacques Davy, 1556-1618. Discorso fatto per parte della camera eccl[essiast]i[c]a in quella del Terzo Stato sopra l'articolo del giuramento / da Monsignore il Cardinale di Perrona Archepiscopo di Sans Primate delle Gallie, e di Germania, e grande elemosiniere di Francia. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Antiphonary]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Olschki, Leo S. (Leo Samuel), 1861-1940,. [Tabula kalendarii]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, II, 1961-2002 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Paris, [between 1500 and 1525]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Politics in Mexico, 1993-1999 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Katsh, Abraham Isaac, 1908-. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Università di Padova. [Diploma delivered by the University of Padua to Dominic Bortoli, Doctor of philosophy and medicine]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Pownall, William, fl. 1724,. [Blickling Homilies]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Letters, 1942 : to Lewis Mumford. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
creatorOf Brazilian “Literatura de Cordel”, 1970s-1990s Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Chant for the festival of St. John, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Brazilian Poetry: Pamphlets I, 1948-1998 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Anaphora of the Virgin Mary and other texts, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Religion in Ecuador, 1977-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Vico, Domingo de, d. 1555. [Theologia indorum de Zacapulas]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Libri, Guillaume, 1803-1869,. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Book of hours : use of Paris, [between 1475 and 1499]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Non-Christian Religious and Spiritual Organizations in Cuba, 1913-2006 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Orthodox Eastern Church. [Sticherarion]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. [Prattica generale p[er] le confessioni]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Economic Development and Conditions in Peru, III, 1987-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Università di Padova. [Diploma delivered by the University of Padua to Luca de Molino of Venice, Doctor of Philosophy]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Education in Colombia, I, 1962-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Anaphora of the Virgin Mary and other texts, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872,. [Statutes of the Realm]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. [Music anthology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Protestant Churches in Cuba III, 1947-2002 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [BWV 80]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Orthodox Eastern Church. [Funeral office]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Manuscript of the records of the original surveys of Elizabeth, N.J.: signed by all parties in interest 1729 to replace the original records destroyed at that time. Elizabeth, 1729-1788. New York Public Library System, NYPL
creatorOf Women in Peru, III, 1986-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Human Rights in Peru, II, 1978-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
referencedIn Hand, Learned. Learned Hand papers. 1840-1961. Harvard Law School Library, Harvard University.
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Es Wartet alles auf Dich]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Naples (Kingdom). Della libertà ecclesiastica : manuscript, [16--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. Festo S. S: Trinitat: Es ist ein trotzig und verzagt Ding [microform] : â 4 vocibus, 2 hautbois, taille, 2 violini, viola e continuo / di J.S. Bach. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Women in Argentina, VI, 1989-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Politics in Venezuela, I, 1978-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Protestant Churches in Cuba II, 1941-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf The Catholic Church in Cuba, 1996-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Leighton, George E.,. Bible, [ca. 1260]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Lampadarios, Petros. [Music anthology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bondumiero, Oliviero, 17th cent. Logismi politici, ò vero, Riflessioni sopra le massime di stato, ricavate dal p[rim]o libro degl[i] Annali di Corn[eli]o Tac[it]o : manuscript, [between 1629 and 1641] / di Oliviero Bondumieri. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Politics and Elections in Uruguay, I, 1984-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Catholic Church. Psalter, [ca. 1250]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Ethiopic psalter fragment : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Evans, Clara Therese,. Clara T. Evans bookplate collection, circa 1740-1960 (bulk 1890-1940). Cornell University Library
creatorOf Samarqandī, ʻAlāʼ al-Dīn Muḥammad ibn Aḥmad, d. 1144?. Kitāb al-uṣūl fī natāʼij al-ʻuqūl [microform]. / ʻAlāʼ al-Dīn al-Samarqandī. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Papadopoulos, Demetrios. [Music anthology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gilbert, de La Porrée, Bishop, ca. 1075-1154. [Bible]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Berni degli Antoni, Francesco, 1693-1760. [Tractatus de feudis et de nuptiis]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf León, Diego de. [Zakicoxol : baile de la conquista en lengua quiché]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Correspondence with Carl Zigrosser, 1958-1968. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
creatorOf Suyūṭī, 1445-1505. al-Hayʼah al-sanīyah fī al-hayʼah al-sunnīyah [microform]. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Orthodox Eastern Church. [Gospel lectionary]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Congregatio Concilii. [Variae resolutiones]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Nah, José María. [Chilam Balam de Nah]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Cantata, BWV 168] [microform]. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Altoviti, Giacomo, 1604-1693. De vescovi assistenti, loro privileggi, perogativo, e servizio nelle publiche funzioni appresso il Papa / di Monsig[no]r Giacomo Altoviti Patriarca di Antiochia : manuscript, 1686. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants, [between 1875 and 1925]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Book of Hours; Use of Rome]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Minorities in Peru, 1982-2008 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospel book : manuscript, [ca. 1667-1682]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Arts and Culture in Brazil, 1962-2007 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Anaphora of the Virgin Mary, [16--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. [Sermones en la lengua quiché]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Labor in Brazil, 1980-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Prayers and other texts, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Psalter, [ca. 1260]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gentili, Antonio-Saverio, 1681-1753,. Discorso istorico sopra l'origine e progressi della regalia : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Bible, [between 1275 and 1299]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Confraternity of the Most Holy Rosary. [Ordenanzas de la Cofradía del Rosario, año de 1689]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. Lives of cults and saints : manuscripts and documents, 1794-1851. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Politics in Argentina, I, 1985-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Ghunaymī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad, d. 1634. Sharh al-Muqaddamah al-Shaʻrānīyah fi ʻIlm al-ʻArabīyah [microform]. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
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creatorOf Catholic Church. Pope (1417-1431 : Martin V). Bull of Pope Martin V, 1419 Jan. 30. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. Matrimoniali : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Lando, Francesco. [Petition of Francesco, Guilio, Silvestro, and Bartolamio Lando, brothers of Verona to Doge Aloysius Mocenigo of Venice]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. Legal documents and municipal records from the district of Valladolid, Yucatán, Mexico, 1712-1866. Newberry Library
referencedIn Princeton University Library Records, 1734-2012, 1952-1995 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections.Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library. Princeton University Archives.
creatorOf Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Argentina, 1985-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Berni degli Antoni, Francesco, 1693-1760. Tractatus de feudis et de nuptiis : manuscript, [18--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Politics in Peru, I, 1931-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Correspondence with E.C. Richardson, 1912 Jan. 20, 24, 26. Pierpont Morgan Library.
creatorOf Augustus Frederick, Prince, Duke of Sussex, 1773-1843,. [Luke with Glossa ordinaria]. Princeton University Library
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creatorOf Economy, Industry, and Trade in Brazil, I, 1954-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Bondumiero, Oliviero, 17th cent. Logismi politici, ò vero, Riflessioni sopra le massime di stato, ricavate dal p[rim]o libro degl[i] Annali di Corn[eli]o Tac[it]o / di Oliviero Bondumieri. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Education in Brazil, 1940-2006 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Scheide, William Taylor, 1847-1907. [Canon law text]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Indigenous Peoples in Chile, 1970-2002 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University Library. [Ordinances]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Vico, Domingo de, d. 1555. [Theologia indorum]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. Dominica 13 post Trinit: Allein zu dir Herr Jesu Christ [microform] : à 4 voci, 2 hautbois, 2 violini, viola e continuo / di Joh: Sebast: Bach. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Land deeds, 1535-1564. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gentili, Antonio-Saverio, 1681-1753,. [Le raggioni di stato con li suoi documenti politici]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Spain. Sovereign (1556-1598 : Philip II). [Carta ejecutoria de hidalguia for Juan Alonzo Davila Negrete of Cuellar, Valladolid]. Princeton University Library
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creatorOf Cofradía de la Santa Vera Cruz (Totonicapán, Guatemala). Ordenanzas de la Cofradía de la Santa Vera Cruz de San Miguel de Totonicapán. Newberry Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Homilies and miracles of the Archangel Gabriel and other texts : manuscript, [18--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. [Testamento en lengua kekchi de Verapaz]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Agrarian Issues in Peru, III, 1920-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Catholic Church in Cuba, III, 1995-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Herm_eneia diaphor_on Pater_on eis tous Psalmous : manuscript, 1662. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. Dominica 7. post Trinitatis [microform] : Es wartet alles auf dich, dass du ihnen : a 4 voci, 2 hautbois, 2 violini, viola, è continuo / di Joh. Sebast. Bach. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
creatorOf Alternative Press from Venezuela, I, 1998-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus, 1756-1791. Sonata III. HCL Technical Services, Harvard College Library
referencedIn Princeton University. Office of Physical Planning. Princeton University Office of Physical Planning architectural drawings, ca. 1870s-1986 (bulk [1950s-1960s] [microform]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Church Materials from Guatemala, II, 1913-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Guild of Pharmacologists (Venice, Italy). [Certificate issued by the Guild of Pharmacologists, Venice to Antonio Banco to establish himself as a druggist]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Pauline epistles : manuscript, [15--]. Princeton University Library
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referencedIn Clara T. Evans bookplate collection, circa 1740-1960, (bulk 1890-1940). Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
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creatorOf Caloiro et Oliva, Placidus, b. 1611. [Portolan charts and a manuscript map]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Augusto Pinochet Ugarte Case, 1998-2000 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Environment and Ecology in Bolivia, I, 1985-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Università di Padova. [Diploma delivered by the University of Padua to Giovanni Ferro of Venice, Doctor of theology]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Environment and Ecology in Ecuador, 1987-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
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creatorOf Human Rights in Argentina, III, 1978-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Antiphonal chants, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Protestant Churches in Cuba, VI, 1944-2007 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
referencedIn Princeton University. Dept. of Buildings and Grounds. Technical correspondence files of the Princeton University Department of Buildings and Grounds, 1866-1964 (bulk 1930s-1940s). Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospel of John and other texts : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Women in Chile, V, 1989-2002 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University Library. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [16--?]. Princeton University Library
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creatorOf George II, King of Great Britain, 1683-1760. [Letters patent : Westminster, to Sir William Lee, 1754 Mar. 8]. Princeton University Library
referencedIn Inventory to the Records of the Rutger University Office of University Librarian (Donald F. Cameron), 1925-1971 Rutgers University Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives.
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Music anthology : manuscript, [18--]. Princeton University Library
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creatorOf Abu-al-Hasan ʻAli ibn-Arfaʻ-Raʼs al-Maghribi al-Andalusi. al-Jihāt fi ʻIlm al-Tawajjuhāt fi Sharh Qasīdat Thābit ibn-Sulaymān [microform]. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Università di Padova. [Diploma delivered by the University of Padua to Francisco de Bartoli of Oderzo, Doctor of Laws]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Youth and Children in Peru, 1994-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Mershon, Grace Lucile Olmstead, 1879-1974. Miscellaneous bits of history regarding Stony Brook Meeting, 1944. Historical Society of Princeton
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creatorOf Cabini, Sigualdus. Deed for sale of land : Castella Petrosa, to Atrianus, son of Stevelus, and Bonetinus, son of John, [999 Dec. 14]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Vico, Domingo de, d. 1555. Theologia yndorum ubinaam. Newberry Library
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. Wills and documents relating to the sale of property in Totonicapan, Guatemala, 1689-1808. Newberry Library
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creatorOf Luther, Martin, 1483-1546. [Prayers]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750. [Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir, BWV 130]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Orthodox Eastern Church. [Doxastarion]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Scheide, John Hinsdale, 1875-1942,. [Document of the National Covenant of Scotland, 1638 Dec.]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Richardson, Ernest Cushing, 1860-1939,. [Tractatus de legibus]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Indigenous Issues in Ecuador, 1983-2001 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospel of John : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Canul, Joan. [Ritual of the Bacabs]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Montecassino (Monastery). [Monastic formulary]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Women in Chile, IV: Pamphlets, 1985-1998 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Gates, William, 1863-1940. [Chilam Balam de Tekax]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Boccaccio, Giovanni, 1313-1375. Il Corbaccio, [between 1375 and 1425]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf The Catholic Church in Cuba, IV, 1988-2008 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
referencedIn R. Ridgely Lytle World War I Collection, 1915-1916 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special CollectionsManuscripts Division
creatorOf Catholic Church. Psalter, [between 1400 and 1425]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Mutul, Baltasar. [Pasión de Jesucristo en la lengua maya]. Newberry Library
creatorOf Industry and Infrastructure in Venezuela, I, 1992-2004 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Religious drawings, [between 1675 and 1825]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [18--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Mainardi, Leonardo. [Artis metrice practice compilatio]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. [Psalter]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Venice (Republic : to 1797). Doge (1501-1521 : Loredano). [Dogale issued by Leonardo Loredano to Giovanni Marco de Molino, Lieutenant of Noale]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Guild of Pharmacologists (Venice, Italy). [Certificate issued by the Guild of Pharmacologists, Venice to Pietro Faces Francisci to establish himself as a druggist]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. Views of Princeton University Library, Sept. 30, 1921. Photographs by Rose and Sons, Princeton. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Minor publications, historical sketches, rules, etc.]. Yale University Library
creatorOf Chauncy, Charles, 1592-1672,. [A plaine Proposall of the Dissenting messengers of the Churches assembled]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, III, 1953-2009 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Ethiopic psalter and other texts : manuscript, [17--?]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Servetus, Michael, 1511?-1553. [Opera varia]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Old testament and other texts : manuscript, [15--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Catholic Church. Nabe tihonic. Newberry Library
creatorOf Education in Chile, II, 1967-2005 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Chauncy, Charles, 1592-1672,. [A plaine Proposall of the Dissenting messengers of the Churches assembled]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Education in Bolivia, I, 1982-2003 Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections
creatorOf Princeton University. Library. [Proskynetarion] : manuscript, [16--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Guild of Pharmacologists (Venice, Italy). [Certificate issued by the Guild of Pharmacologists, Venice to Carolo Guaita to establish himself as a druggist]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf Garrett, Robert, 1875-1961,. Gospel of John and other texts : manuscript, [17--]. Princeton University Library
creatorOf