Textile Workers' Union of America

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Located in Boston, the TWUA began in 1937 as the Textile Workers' Organizing Committee of the CIO. By 1939, its success in organizing workers led to its becoming an independent CIO-affiliated union. One of the first victories was a contract with the American Woolen Co. in Lawrence, Mass. By 1942, mills in a number of New England cities were unionized. After World War II, the TWUA faced serious problems from national anti-labor legislation such as the Taft-Hartley Act, and the slump in the textile industry in New England due to competition from southern mills and those abroad. Internal division in the TWUA led to a faction of the union breaking away in the 1950's to join the AFL's United Textile Workers. Continued decline in the textile industry in New England necessitated the TWUA's joining forces in 1976 with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. In 1995, ACTWU merged with the ILGWU (International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union) to form Unite!(Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees), with headquarters in New York City.

From the description of [Business records]. 1939-1980. (American Textile History Museum Library). WorldCat record id: 49628060

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, the most significant union representing workers in the men's clothing industry, was founded in New York City in 1914 as a breakaway movement from the United Garment Workers. Radical and immigrant workers in the tailors’ and cutters’ locals were the core of the seceding group, which advocated industrial unionism and economic strikes in opposition to the UGW’s craft organization, which they saw as conservative and timid. Their diverging views had come to the fore during the historic 1910 dispute at the Chicago firm Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. The opposition called the strike against the UGW leadership’s advice, and reached a path-breaking agreement with management that established an arbitration system to settle disputes.

Members flocked to the new union. Around 50,000 strong at its founding, by 1920 the ACWA counted about 170,000 members. Initially composed mostly of immigrants of Jewish European descent with Socialist leanings, the ACWA quickly welcomed members of a great number of nationalities and diverse backgrounds. Like in other garment unions, most workers and many members were women, but the leadership was predominantly male, a situation that did not change for many decades. Early on the union adopted a centralized administrative structure combined with industrial unionism, with the joint boards’ by-laws having precedence over those of locals.

Espousing a philosophy perhaps brought over by its early immigrant socialist members, the Amalgamated went beyond bread and butter issues and adopted a distinctive form of social unionism that was largely absent in the American labor movement. Starting in the 1920s, it provided educational opportunities and recreational facilities for its members, as well as services such as an insurance plan, banks offering personal loans at low interest rates, low-cost housing cooperatives, medical clinics, and even union-owned restaurants.

Sidney Hillman was the first president of the new union and the most important officer in its history. He applied his experience as bargaining representative in Chicago to the whole industry. Under his leadership the union made significant strides in securing better wages and working conditions for its members, and at the same time it consolidated gains and provided stability to the industry through the widespread adoption of the arbitration system tested at Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. Hillman paid close attention to industry issues, such as production, pricing, and marketing. In order to help management meet the competition of non-union firms, the union conducted studies of efficiency, work methods, and factory costs. Letters to the official publication of the union, Advance, document the controversy that ensued within the union over what was perceived to be collaboration with management.

Hillman also understood the importance of labor’s involvement in national affairs and political action. In the 1920s the ACWA sent delegates to the Conference for Progressive Political Action and to the Farmer-labor party conventions. Although many members and officers were Socialists, the union stopped short of officially endorsing the party. Communist attempts at gaining influence within the union were firmly curbed. Hillman’s participation in national affairs and politics became prominent during the New Deal, when he became a close advisor to Franklin D. Roosevelt on labor and economic issues. He also served on the board of the National Recovery Administration. Later, during World War II, he helped establish the Labor’s Non Partisan League. He was also named associate director of the Office of Production Management, which assisted in mobilizing the nation's resources for the war effort. Hillman’s prestige perhaps reflected the healthy condition of his union, which by the end of the conflict was strong and stable.

During the post World War II period the union faced a number of significant challenges. Membership continued to grow (peaking at 395,000 in 1968), but the union’s political influence and visibility in national affairs declined. In their never ending pursuit of lower production costs, many firms relocated to the South, forcing the union to engage in large organizing efforts. Simultaneously, signs began to appear of changes that would lead to the almost complete demise of the domestic apparel industry and, ultimately, to the erosion of union membership. Foreign imports of cheap clothing goods steadily grew in the 1950s and 1960s, and mushroomed in the following two decades, plunging employment in the apparel sector into a steady decline. Union efforts to stem the tide included Buy American campaigns and extensive lobbying in Congress, but they were to no avail. In 1976, the ACWA merged with the Textile Workers of America to become the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. Despite successful and much publicized nationwide actions such as the Farah boycott and the J.P. Stevens corporate campaign, the woes threatening the union’s existence continued unabated. The fate of the domestic industry was sealed in the late 1970s and the 1980s by the flight of firms chasing tax breaks and cheap labor abroad. By 1995, when ACTWU voted to merge with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, their combined membership was 350,000. The new Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE!) seemed poised to infuse new life in a troubled union.

From the guide to the ACTWU's Out-of-Business Contracts, 1937-2000, (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, the most significant union representing workers in the men's clothing industry, was founded in New York City in 1914 as a breakaway movement from the United Garment Workers. Radical and immigrant workers in the tailors’ and cutters’ locals were the core of the seceding group, which advocated industrial unionism and economic strikes in opposition to the UGW’s craft organization, which they saw as conservative and timid. Their diverging views had come to the fore during the historic 1910 dispute at the Chicago firm Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. The opposition called the strike against the UGW leadership’s advice, and reached a path-breaking agreement with management that established an arbitration system to settle disputes.

Members flocked to the new union. Around 50,000 strong at its founding, by 1920 the ACWA counted about 170,000 members. Initially composed mostly of immigrants of Jewish European descent with Socialist leanings, the ACWA quickly welcomed members of a great number of nationalities and diverse backgrounds. Like in other garment unions, most workers and many members were women, but the leadership was predominantly male, a situation that did not change for many decades. Early on the union adopted a centralized administrative structure combined with industrial unionism, with the joint boards’ by-laws having precedence over those of locals.

Espousing a philosophy perhaps brought over by its early immigrant socialist members, the Amalgamated went beyond bread and butter issues and adopted a distinctive form of social unionism that was largely absent in the American labor movement. Starting in the 1920s, it provided educational opportunities and recreational facilities for its members, as well as services such as an insurance plan, banks offering personal loans at low interest rates, low-cost housing cooperatives, medical clinics, and even union-owned restaurants.

Sidney Hillman was the first president of the new union and the most important officer in its history. He applied his experience as bargaining representative in Chicago to the whole industry. Under his leadership the union made significant strides in securing better wages and working conditions for its members, and at the same time it consolidated gains and provided stability to the industry through the widespread adoption of the arbitration system tested at Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. Hillman paid close attention to industry issues, such as production, pricing, and marketing. In order to help management meet the competition of non-union firms, the union conducted studies of efficiency, work methods, and factory costs. Letters to the official publication of the union, Advance, document the controversy that ensued within the union over what was perceived to be collaboration with management.

Hillman also understood the importance of labor’s involvement in national affairs and political action. In the 1920s the ACWA sent delegates to the Conference for Progressive Political Action and to the Farmer-labor party conventions. Although many members and officers were Socialists, the union stopped short of officially endorsing the party. Communist attempts at gaining influence within the union were firmly curbed. Hillman’s participation in national affairs and politics became prominent during the New Deal, when he became a close advisor to Franklin D. Roosevelt on labor and economic issues. He also served on the board of the National Recovery Administration. Later, during World War II, he helped establish the Labor’s Non Partisan League. He was also named associate director of the Office of Production Management, which assisted in mobilizing the nation's resources for the war effort. Hillman’s prestige perhaps reflected the healthy condition of his union, which by the end of the conflict was strong and stable.

During the post World War II period the union faced a number of significant challenges. Membership continued to grow (peaking at 395,000 in 1968), but the union’s political influence and visibility in national affairs declined. In their never ending pursuit of lower production costs, many firms relocated to the South, forcing the union to engage in large organizing efforts. Simultaneously, signs began to appear of changes that would lead to the almost complete demise of the domestic apparel industry and, ultimately, to the erosion of union membership. Foreign imports of cheap clothing goods steadily grew in the 1950s and 1960s, and mushroomed in the following two decades, plunging employment in the apparel sector into a steady decline. Union efforts to stem the tide included Buy American campaigns and extensive lobbying in Congress, but they were to no avail. In 1976, the ACWA merged with the Textile Workers of America to become the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. Despite successful and much publicized nationwide actions such as the Farah boycott and the J.P. Stevens corporate campaign, the woes threatening the union’s existence continued unabated. The fate of the domestic industry was sealed in the late 1970s and the 1980s by the flight of firms chasing tax breaks and cheap labor abroad. By 1995, when ACTWU voted to merge with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, their combined membership was 350,000. The new Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE!) seemed poised to infuse new life in a troubled union.

From the guide to the ACTWU's Conventions Records, 1972-1987, (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, the most significant union representing workers in the men's clothing industry, was founded in New York City in 1914 as a breakaway movement from the United Garment Workers. Radical and immigrant workers in the tailors’ and cutters’ locals were the core of the seceding group, which advocated industrial unionism and economic strikes in opposition to the UGW’s craft organization, which they saw as conservative and timid. Their diverging views had come to the fore during the historic 1910 dispute at the Chicago firm Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. The opposition called the strike against the UGW leadership’s advice, and reached a path-breaking agreement with management that established an arbitration system to settle disputes.

Members flocked to the new union. Around 50,000 strong at its founding, by 1920 the ACWA counted about 170,000 members. Initially composed mostly of immigrants of Jewish European descent with Socialist leanings, the ACWA quickly welcomed members of a great number of nationalities and diverse backgrounds. Like in other garment unions, most workers and many members were women, but the leadership was predominantly male, a situation that did not change for many decades. Early on the union adopted a centralized administrative structure combined with industrial unionism, with the joint boards’ by-laws having precedence over those of locals.

Espousing a philosophy perhaps brought over by its early immigrant socialist members, the Amalgamated went beyond bread and butter issues and adopted a distinctive form of social unionism that was largely absent in the American labor movement. Starting in the 1920s, it provided educational opportunities and recreational facilities for its members, as well as services such as an insurance plan, banks offering personal loans at low interest rates, low-cost housing cooperatives, medical clinics, and even union-owned restaurants.

Sidney Hillman was the first president of the new union and the most important officer in its history. He applied his experience as bargaining representative in Chicago to the whole industry. Under his leadership the union made significant strides in securing better wages and working conditions for its members, and at the same time it consolidated gains and provided stability to the industry through the widespread adoption of the arbitration system tested at Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. Hillman paid close attention to industry issues, such as production, pricing, and marketing. In order to help management meet the competition of non-union firms, the union conducted studies of efficiency, work methods, and factory costs. Letters to the official publication of the union, Advance, document the controversy that ensued within the union over what was perceived to be collaboration with management.

Hillman also understood the importance of labor’s involvement in national affairs and political action. In the 1920s the ACWA sent delegates to the Conference for Progressive Political Action and to the Farmer-labor party conventions. Although many members and officers were Socialists, the union stopped short of officially endorsing the party. Communist attempts at gaining influence within the union were firmly curbed. Hillman’s participation in national affairs and politics became prominent during the New Deal, when he became a close advisor to Franklin D. Roosevelt on labor and economic issues. He also served on the board of the National Recovery Administration. Later, during World War II, he helped establish the Labor’s Non Partisan League. He was also named associate director of the Office of Production Management, which assisted in mobilizing the nation's resources for the war effort. Hillman’s prestige perhaps reflected the healthy condition of his union, which by the end of the conflict was strong and stable.

During the post World War II period the union faced a number of significant challenges. Membership continued to grow (peaking at 395,000 in 1968), but the union’s political influence and visibility in national affairs declined. In their never ending pursuit of lower production costs, many firms relocated to the South, forcing the union to engage in large organizing efforts. Simultaneously, signs began to appear of changes that would lead to the almost complete demise of the domestic apparel industry and, ultimately, to the erosion of union membership. Foreign imports of cheap clothing goods steadily grew in the 1950s and 1960s, and mushroomed in the following two decades, plunging employment in the apparel sector into a steady decline. Union efforts to stem the tide included Buy American campaigns and extensive lobbying in Congress, but they were to no avail. In 1976, the ACWA merged with the Textile Workers of America to become the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. Despite successful and much publicized nationwide actions such as the Farah boycott and the J.P. Stevens corporate campaign, the woes threatening the union’s existence continued unabated. The fate of the domestic industry was sealed in the late 1970s and the 1980s by the flight of firms chasing tax breaks and cheap labor abroad. By 1995, when ACTWU voted to merge with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, their combined membership was 350,000. The new Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE!) seemed poised to infuse new life in a troubled union.

From the guide to the ACTWU's Sander Genis Papers, 1916-1980, (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

Archival Resources
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referencedIn Kress, Melville L. Papers, 1947-1981. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
referencedIn C.I.O. Organizing Committee. Tennessee. Papers, df 1940-1953. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
referencedIn Leighton, Joel B. Papers, 1942-1943. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
referencedIn International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. ILGWU. Research Department records, 1945-1995. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Textile Workers Union of America. South Region. Textile Workers Union of America. South Region records, 1947-1991 [manuscript]. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
referencedIn Harrison, Gilbert A. Gilbert A. Harrison papers, 1902-1978 (bulk 1960-1975). Library of Congress
referencedIn ACWA's Jacob Potofsky Records from the President's Office, 1941-1977 Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
referencedIn United Textile Workers of America. Southern Region. Area A. Southern Region, Area A records, 1956-1975. Georgia State University
referencedIn Podojil, Antoinette, 1911-. Oral history interview with Antoinette Podojil, 1976. Wayne State University, Archives of Labor & Urban Affairs
referencedIn Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees. UNITE Organizational and Biographical History. 1998. Cornell University Library
creatorOf Textile Workers Union of America. TWUA's Executive Council Minutes, 1973-1976. Cornell University Library
referencedIn United States. National War Labor Board (1942-1945). Series 2, Subseries 5. Administrative files, 1942-1946. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Graham Arthur Barden Papers, 1934-1960 David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
referencedIn Harriet & Henderson Cotton Mills. Harriet & Henderson Cotton Mills records, 1885-1999. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
referencedIn Harriet & Henderson Cotton Mills Records, 1885-1999 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection
Role Title Holding Repository
Direct Relationships
Relation Name
associatedWith Achroyd, Herman, person
associatedWith AFL-CIO Connecticut State Labor Council. corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union. Department of Occupational Safety and Health corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. General Exectutive Board corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. Hosiery Division. corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. International Affairs Department corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union. Research Department corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union. Rieve-Pollock Foundation corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union. Textile Division corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Worker Union. Hudson Valley Area Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing & Textile Workers Union. corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Department of Occupational Safety and Health corporateBody
associatedWith Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Research Department corporateBody
associatedWith American Federation of Hosiery Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith American Federation of Labor. corporateBody
associatedWith American Woolen Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Art Gundersheim person
associatedWith Baldanzi, George, 1907-1972. person
associatedWith Barden, Graham Arthur, 1896-1967 person
associatedWith Barkin, Solomon, 1902- person
associatedWith Barkin, Solomon, 1907- person
associatedWith Barrett, Bertrand. person
associatedWith Belanger, J. William, 1907-1986 person
associatedWith Belanger, William. person
associatedWith Bishop, Merlin D. person
associatedWith Burnett, Kenneth. person
associatedWith Cannon Mills. person
correspondedWith Cheney Brothers Silk Manufacturing Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Cioni, Peter J. person
associatedWith C.I.O. Organizing Committee. North Carolina. corporateBody
associatedWith C.I.O. Organizing Committee. South Carolina. corporateBody
associatedWith C.I.O. Organizing Committee. Tennessee. corporateBody
associatedWith C.I.O. Organizing Committee. Tennessee. corporateBody
associatedWith C.I.O. Organizing Committee. Virginia. corporateBody
associatedWith Clifton Mills (S.C.) corporateBody
associatedWith Cole, David Lawrence, 1902-1977. person
associatedWith Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.). North Carolina Political Action Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.). Publicity Dept. North Carolina. corporateBody
associatedWith Cook, Wesley, 1902- person
associatedWith Copelof, Maxwell. person
associatedWith Copelof, Maxwell, 1897- person
associatedWith Daoust, J. Harold. person
associatedWith Demers, R. Bertrand. person
associatedWith De Vyver, Frank Traver, 1904-1980. person
associatedWith Edelman, John W., 1893-1971. person
associatedWith Edna Mill (Reidsville, N.C.) corporateBody
associatedWith Erwin Cotton Mills. corporateBody
associatedWith Federation of Dyers, Finishers, Printers, and Bleachers of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Genis, Sander, 1985-1991 person
associatedWith Greene, Vivian. person
associatedWith Halstead, Freddy Elmer. person
associatedWith Harriet & Henderson Cotton Mills. corporateBody
associatedWith Harrison, Gilbert A. person
associatedWith Harrison, Gilbert A. person
associatedWith Hilpert, Elmer E., 1905-1975. person
associatedWith Hodgman, Alton. person
associatedWith Hotchkiss, Willard Eugene. person
associatedWith Hotchkiss, Willard Eugene, 1874-1956. person
associatedWith Internatinal Ladies' Garment Workers' Union corporateBody
associatedWith International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union corporateBody
associatedWith International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. corporateBody
associatedWith International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. corporateBody
associatedWith International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. corporateBody
associatedWith Jacob Potofsky person
associatedWith Janesville Bicentennial Labor Oral History Project corporateBody
associatedWith Jensen, Vernon. person
associatedWith Joseph Bancroft & Sons Company. corporateBody
associatedWith J.P. Stevens & Co. corporateBody
associatedWith J.P. Stevens & Co. corporateBody
associatedWith Kampelman, Max M., 1920- person
associatedWith Kress, Melville L. person
associatedWith Labor Research Association (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Leighton, Joel B. person
associatedWith Maine Spinning Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Martínez, Jaime, 1946- person
associatedWith Maverick Mills. corporateBody
associatedWith McKee, Don, 1916- person
associatedWith Methuen International Mills. corporateBody
correspondedWith Nation (New York, N.Y. : 1865). corporateBody
associatedWith Northern Textile Association. corporateBody
associatedWith Northern Textile Association. corporateBody
associatedWith Ohio State Joint Textile Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Parzinger, Tommi, 1903-1981. person
associatedWith Payton, Boyd E., 1908- person
associatedWith Podojil, Antoinette, 1911- person
associatedWith Pollock, William, 1899-1982. person
associatedWith Reiss, Sam. person
associatedWith Reiss, Sam. person
associatedWith Reuther, Walter, 1907-1970. person
associatedWith Rieve, Emil, 1892-1975. person
associatedWith Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962. person
associatedWith Ross, Charles L. (Charles Lewis), 1914-1984. person
associatedWith Roy, Donald F. person
associatedWith Russell, Steve, and Mobley, Donna, 1941-1994 person
associatedWith Sander Genis person
associatedWith Sposato, Joseph. person
associatedWith Stamey, E. Leon. person
associatedWith Stetin, Sol person
associatedWith Stetin, Sol, 1910-2005 person
associatedWith Sullivan, Anna, 1903- person
associatedWith Tamiment Library. corporateBody
associatedWith Terrill, Tom E. person
associatedWith Textile Workers of America. Great Northern Joint Board corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers of America. Local 1242 corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers of America. Local 129 corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers of America. Local 3 corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers of America. Local 607 corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Organizing Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Cherokee-Spartanburg Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers' Union of America. General Exectutive Board corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Greater Boston Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Greater Lawrence Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Greater Lowell Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Greensboro-Burlington Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers' Union of America. Hosiery Division corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Local 406. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Mecklenburg County Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Research Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers' Union of America. Rieve-Pollock Foundation corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. South Carolina State Director. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. Southern Region. Director. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers Union of America. South Region. corporateBody
associatedWith Textile Workers' Union of America. Textile Division corporateBody
associatedWith Thornburgh, Lucille, 1909- person
associatedWith Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees. corporateBody
associatedWith Union of Needletrades, Industrial, and Textile Employees. Local 169. Amalgamated Northeast Regional Joint Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Union of Needletrades, Industrial, and Textile Employees. Research Department. corporateBody
associatedWith Union of Needletrades, Industrial, and Textile Employees. Research Department. corporateBody
associatedWith Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE) corporateBody
associatedWith UNITE corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Dept. of Labor. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. National War Labor Board (1942-1945) corporateBody
associatedWith United Textile Workers of America. corporateBody
associatedWith United Textile Workers of America. Local 257 (Erwin, N.C.) corporateBody
associatedWith United Textile Workers of America. Southern Region. Area A. corporateBody
associatedWith UNITE HERE (Organization) corporateBody
associatedWith University of Connecticut. Labor Education Center. corporateBody
associatedWith Vidal, Gore, 1925- person
associatedWith William Whitaker & Sons, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Wolfson, Theresa, 1897-1972. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
New England
New York (State)
North Carolina--Aberdeen
Subject
Textile workers--Labor unions--New York (State)--New York
Labor unions--Organizing
Textile industry--Planning
Labor union members
Collective labor agreements--Textile industry
Clothing workers--Labor unions--New York (State)--New York
Textile industry
Textile workers
Industry
Bobbins (Textile machinery)
Textile workers--Labor unions
Collective bargaining--Textile industry
Labor union locals
Textile machinery
Clothing workers--Labor unions
Labor unions--Officials and employees
Clothing trade--New York (State)--New York
Industrial relations
Textile industry--New York (State)--New York
Textile workers' strike, United States, 1934
Textile workers' strike, Henderson, N.C., 1958-1961
Occupation
Function

Corporate Body

Active 1915

Active 1990

Information

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