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Richard Halleck Brodhead became Duke's ninth president on July 1, 2004, after a 32-year career at Yale University. In addition to serving as president, he is a professor of English at Duke. Born in Dayton, Ohio, he graduated from Yale in 1968 and received his Ph.D. there in 1972. He then joined the Yale faculty, where he became the A. Bartlett Giamatti Professor of English and American Studies. After serving as chair of Yale's Department of English for six years, Brodhead was named dean of Yale College in 1993 and served in the post for 11 years until he assumed Duke's presidency. His writings as dean are collected in The Good of This Place: Values and Challenges in College Education. He was presented with the 2006 Wilbur Lucius Cross Medal by the Yale Graduate School Alumni Association.

From the guide to the President Richard H. Brodhead Reference Collection, 2004-Ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

One of the long-standing traditions of Trinity College and Duke University is the observance of honoring the benefactors of the institution. The practice was formalized by the Board of Trustees on June 4, 1901, when October 3 was designated as Benefactors' Day in honor of Washington Duke. The original intent "to honor Washington Duke forever" has been kept in spirit but through the years the name and even date of the annual observance has changed. It has been called Benefactors' Day (1901-1924), Duke University Day (1926-1947), and since 1948, Founders' Day. The most common forms of recognition have been an address on campus, the laying of a wreath at the tombs of the Dukes, and for many years the planting of trees by the senior class presidents to beautify the campus. The day has been the occasion for the presentation of special donations and awards, the dedication of buildings or gifts such as the Flentrop Organ in 1976, and the awarding of honorary degrees.

From the description of Founders' Day Reference Collection, 1902-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 213434195

The Duke University Union, founded in 1954 as the Duke Student Union, has as its purpose promoting social, recreational, cultural, educational and spiritual activities at Duke. Membership is now open to all members of the Duke community. At present (2009), an executive group and program directors administer the Union.

From the description of Duke University Union Reference Collection, 1962-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 693874728

From the guide to the Duke University Union Reference Collection, 1962-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Founders' Society was created in 1980 to honor individuals, corporations, foundations, and organizations whose gifts of endowment have strengthened and ensured continuing excellence for Duke University. Founders' Society members are honored by the University: through recognition at a special presentation during Founders' Day Weekend; through invitations to special events and programs relating to the initiatives they support; through the Founders' Society banquet; and with the presentation of a replica The Sower statue. Numbering 193 at its inception in 1980 membership reached more than 1550 by 1995. The Founders' Society ended in 2004.

From the guide to the Founders' Society Reference Collection, 1980-1997, (University Archives, Duke University)

In January, 2005, funds granted by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation allowed the Duke University Archives to survey University-owned paintings within the Perkins Library system. Prior to the survey, records of University-owned art that had been collected by University Archives staff, and these records were organized and collated with the new survey information. Over 100 works were identified, surveyed, and photographed. Approximately 80 other paintings were identified but not surveyed due to time constraints. A brochure was produced entitled Portraits in the Gothic Reading Room which detailed the history of the Gothic Reading Room of Perkins Library and the portraits it contains.

From the guide to the Art and Artifacts Records, ., 1915 - 2005, (University Archives, Duke University)

When James B. Duke selected the site for Duke University's West Campus, in 1925, he chose to locate the Chapel on the site's highest ridge. The Chapel was the first building planned for the new campus, but the last one to be completed. Construction started in 1930, was completed in 1935, and cost nearly $2.3 million. The Chapel began to be used before its stained-glass windows and other details were finished; commencement was held in the Chapel in 1932.

From the description of Chapel Reference Collection, 1933-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 243467646

The Founders' Society was created in 1980 to honor individuals, corporations, foundations, and organizations whose gifts of endowment have strengthened and ensured continuing excellence for Duke University.

From the description of Founders' Society Reference Collection, 1980-1997. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191749443

From 1930 to 1969, the Woman's College Library (now the Lilly Library) on East Campus was the principal venue for art exhibits at Duke. In 1969, Duke University opened an art museum in the renovated science building on East Campus. In 1998, alumnus Raymond D. Nasher donated funds to support construction of a new art museum at Duke University, the Nasher Museum of Art, which opened in 2005.

From the guide to the Duke University Museum of Art Reference Collection, ., 1932 - 2001, (University Archives, Duke University)

Han Chiao-shun (Charles "Charlie" Jones Soong) was Trinity College's first international student. He was an American-trained missionary who became a successful business man and industrialist in Shanghai as well as patriarch of the influential Soong family.

From the description of Charles Jones Soong Reference Collection, 1882-1995. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 184983953

The Freshman Life Reference Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for research purposes.

From the description of Freshman Life Reference Collection, 1946-2001. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 164347190

The Office of Human Resources supports the development of Duke's human resources and work culture. It believes that a diverse, respectful environment allows human potential to flourish and grow. Its commitment is to advance Duke's strategic mission of excellence in education, research, and patient care through its support of a creative and dynamic community.

From the description of Office of Human Resources Reference Collection, 1950-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191732068

The Office of Intercultural Affairs evolved out of a series of offices established to address concerns of minority populations, primarily of undergraduates attending Duke University. Some predecessor offices included the Office of Black Affairs, and the Office of Minority Affairs, and the Center for Multicultural Affairs.

From the description of Office of Intercultural Affairs Reference Collection, 2000-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 691271224

From the guide to the Office of Intercultural Affairs Reference Collection, 2000-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Faculty Reference Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources.

From the description of Faculty Reference Collection, 1972-2000. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 164331374

The Auxiliary Services division was formed in 1980 and is responsible for the operations of food services, special events and conference services, transportation, housekeeping, housing management, office services, and the stores. See the newsletter "News and Views" for a history.

From the description of Auxiliary Services Reference Collection, 1986-2002. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 162101607

The Bassett Affair is a celebrated case that helped establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States and is a benchmark incident in race relations in the South. John Spencer Bassett, a Trinity College professor, published a series of articles in the South Atlantic Quarterly (1903) that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. A campaign to remove Bassett from the faculty was thwarted by a vote of support for Bassett from the University's Board of Trustees on Dec. 2, 1903.

From the guide to the Bassett Affair Collection, ., 1903 - 2003, (University Archives, Duke University)

In 1841, Trinity College in Randolph County, NC was first formally chartered as Union Institute and was formed by the Union Institution Society, a group of Methodists and Quakers. Braxton Craven became head of the institution in 1842. The school was re-chartered in 1851 as Normal College. In 1859, the institution's name was changed to Trinity College upon affiliation with the Methodist Church. In 1892, Trinity College relocated to Durham, NC.

From the guide to the Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) Reference Collection, 1889-1992, (University Archives, Duke University)

The University Archives Poster Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources.

From the description of University Archives Poster Collection, 1935-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 243467709

From the guide to the University Archives Poster Collection, 1935-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Founded in 1926 as the first of the university's graduate professional schools, the Divinity School attracts students from around the nation and several different countries. One of 13 seminaries founded and supported by the United Methodist Church, the school has from its beginnings been ecumenical in aspiration, teaching, and practice. With many diverse theological perspectives, students find common ground through immersion in Scripture and the church's tradition for addressing the challenges of faith in today's world.

From the description of Divinity School Reference Collection, 1926-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 243474482

The Sarah P. Duke Gardens Reference Collection was compiled from a variety of sources by University Archives staff for reference and research.

From the description of Sarah P. Duke Gardens Reference Collection, 1934-2001. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 170923847

The Duke Student Government (DSG) replaced the existing student government Associated Students of Duke University (ASDU), in 1993 under a new organization in which the legislative and executive branches were consolidated.

From the description of Duke Student Government Reference Collection, 1993-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 184904217

From the guide to the Duke Student Government Reference Collection, 1993-[ongoing], (University Archives, Duke University)

The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation was established as a trust on September 14, 1956. Its primary purpose is to further and extend Mrs.Biddle's life-long interests in religious, educational, and charitable activities in New York City and the state of North Carolina. By design the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation stipulates that at least 50 percent of the income or principal expended each year be directed to religious, scientific, literary, medical research, or educational purposes at Duke University. Grant requests are reviewed at quarterly board meetings, usually in March, June, September, and December.

From the description of Mary Duke Biddle Foundation Reference Collection, 1970-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 213434390

From the guide to the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation Reference Collection, 1970-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Duke Endowment is a common law charitable trust that began its legal existence on December 11, 1924, when James Buchanan Duke signed the Indenture, which established a $40 million dollar endowment whose mission is to serve the people of North Carolina and South Carolina by supporting selected programs of higher education, health care, children's welfare, and spiritual life. Market Value of Endowment Assets as of Dec. 31, 2006: Approximately $2.9 billion.

From the guide to the Duke Endowment Reference Collection, 1964-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Since 1924, the Undergraduate Publications Board, commonly referred to as the Pub Board or UPB, has overseen the production of each of the university's recognized publications (with the exception of The Chronicle and Towerview). The Board also approves and supports emerging publications, known as Independents, runs the Blackburn Literary Festival, and administers the John Spencer Bassett Fund. Its continuing mission is to provide diverse forums in which students can engage their creative, intellectual, political and literary faculties.

From the description of Undergraduate Publications Board Reference Collection, 1893-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 213434885

The Alumni Association contracted with the famed English firm of Josiah Wedgwood & Sons to produce a set of commemorative china plates for the 1938-1939 centennial celebration of Duke University.

From the description of Duke University Wedgwood Plates Reference Collection, 1937-1938. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191748057

Robert Franklin Durden was born in Graymont, Georgia in 1925. He earned an A.B. (1947) and M.A. (1948) from Emory University, and a Ph.D. from Princeton University (1952). He served in the U.S. Navy from 1943 to 1946. He was an instructor and fellow at Princeton from 1950 to 1952. He joined the faculty of the History Department at Duke University in 1952, and served as chair of the Department from 1974 to 1980. He has been a Fulbright Professor at Johns Hopkins University and Monash University (Melbourne, Australia), and a visiting professor at several schools. He is now (2005) Professor emeritus. His field is 19th century U.S. history, Civil War and Southern history. He is also interested in the history of the Duke Family, Duke University, the Duke Endowment, and Duke Power Company.

From the description of Robert F. Durden Reference Collection, 1965-2000. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 163582069

From the guide to the Robert F. Durden Reference Collection, circa 1965-2001, (University Archives, Duke University)

On November 21, 1852 the State of North Carolina authorized Normal College, Duke's predecessor institution, "to grant such degrees and marks of honor as are given by colleges and universities generally." The institution first awarded A.B. degrees the following year, and thus 1853 is our "degree date." Two brothers, D. C. and Lemuel Johnson, were the recipients, and made up the first graduating class. The 2009 commencement was the one hundred and fifty seventh. The University began printing commencement numbers on the programs in 1932, when that year's was marked as the eightieth commencement. The count therefore was started with the 1853 ceremony. Union Institute and Normal College did celebrate commencement before 1853; however no degrees were awarded at those ceremonies.

From the description of Commencement Exercises Reference Collection, 1850-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 693872386

From the guide to the Commencement Exercises Reference Collection, 1850-2011, (University Archives, Duke University)

After the opening of Duke's West Campus in 1930, the arrangement and administration of residential life at the University remained fairly static through the 1950s. Some fraternities had the same blocks of rooms for decades. Then, beginning with the work of the University Committee on Long-Range Planning (1958-1962), residential arrangements and administration came under close review. That process has continued. Groups involved in it have included the Undergraduate Faculty Council, its successor, the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (UFCAS), and its successor, the Arts and Sciences Council, the West Campus Community Council (WCCC), the Community Council of the Woman's College (CoCoWoCo), the Residential Life Committee, the Residential Policy Committee, and successor groups. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

From the description of Residential Life Reference Collection, 1922-2001 (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758676744

The Gross-Edens Affair culminated in the 1960 resignation of then-President Arthur H. Edens and the demotion of the University's chief academic officer, Paul M. Gross, Vice-President in the Educational Division. The matter is significant in Duke's history as one of three administrative shakeups within a two-decade period that involved the University's presidency. The first of these was the debate in the late 1940s over how to gracefully end President Robert Lee Flowers' term in office, the second, the Gross-Edens Affair, and the third, the resignation of Dr. Douglas M. Knight from the presidency in 1969. The Gross-Edens Affair impacted the Bylaws of the University, makeup and role of the University's Board of Trustees, the organization of the University's senior administrative offices, and the role of the faculty in the governance of the institution.

From the description of Gross-Edens Affair Reference Collection, 1960, 1994. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 492167432

From the guide to the Gross-Edens Affair Reference Collection, 1960, 1994, (University Archives, Duke University)

The University Archives Postcard Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources.

From the description of University Archives Postcard Collection, 1905-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 243467181

From the guide to the University Archives Postcard Collection, 1905-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

This material was donated by James M. Snyder, Jr. in 1997.

From the description of Navy V-12 Program Collection, 1943-1944. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 388493876

The mission of the Division of Student Affairs is to promote and enrich students' education through teaching, mentoring, advising, and counseling by way of on-going direct contact with students in their every day lives. The division was created in the summer of 1979. Student Affairs is comprised of a multitude of departments, all of which work in tandem to support and enrich students' educational experiences during their time at Duke University. These departments include: Campus Life; Career Center; Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS); Dean of Students Office; Residence Life and Housing Services; Student Health Center; and Resource Administration.

From the description of Division of Student Affairs Reference Collection, 1987-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 243470774

In an effort to bring all the revenue producing branches of the Business and Finance Division under one office in the early 1960s a Business Auxiliaries department was organized. It included Administrative Data Processing, Dining Halls, Housing Management and University Stores, and later, the Computation Center. From 1976 to 1980 a Campus Services department oversaw a number of activities that had been previously administered by the Physical Plant Department. These included custodial services, grounds maintenance, studio productions, office equipment, transportation, and mail. In 1980 the Auxiliary Services Division was created to replace Business Auxiliaries and Campus Services. In 2009, it was responsible for the operations of food services, special events and conference services, transportation and parking, housekeeping, housing management, office services, and the campus stores. See the newsletter, News and Views, FY1994-1995, for a history. In earlier years, parking was managed by Public Safety (now the Duke Police Dept.), but materials from that period are housed in this collection, rather than under Public Safety.

From the guide to the Auxiliary Services Reference Collection, 1912-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

After the opening of Duke's West Campus in 1930, the arrangement and administration of residential life at the University remained fairly static through the 1950s. Some fraternities had the same blocks of rooms for decades. Then, beginning with the work of the University Committee on Long-Range Planning (1958-1962), residential arrangements and administration came under close review. That process has continued. Groups involved in it have included the Undergraduate Faculty Council, its successor, the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (UFCAS), and its successor, the Arts and Sciences Council, the West Campus Community Council (WCCC), the Community Council of the Woman's College (CoCoWoCo), the Residential Life Committee, the Residential Policy Committee, and successor groups.

From the guide to the Residential Life Reference Collection, 1922-2001, (University Archives, Duke University)

The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching.

From the description of University Archives Photograph Collection, 1861-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 166142286

From the guide to the University Archives Photograph Collection, 1861-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Established in 1961 under a Ford Foundation grant to the Commonwealth Studies Center, the Program in Comparative Studies on Southern Asia was established to facilitate research on, and the training of graduate students in, the political, historical, economical and sociocultural development of Commonwealth countries in Southern Asia. A South Asia Center was established in 1963. Currently (2007) South Asia is an Area Course in International Comparative Studies.

From the guide to the Program in Comparative Studies on Southern Asia Reference Collection, 1965-[ongoing], (University Archives, Duke University)

The Athletics Reference Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources.

From the description of Athletics Reference Collection, 1888-2005. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 159936026

The Duke University Board of Trustees is the administrative decision-making body that oversees the planning and direction of the University. The Board consists of 36 members. More information about the Board can be found at the University Secretary's website at: http://www.duke.edu/web/ous/

From the guide to the Board of Trustees Reference Collection, ., 1941 - 2002, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is a non-profit consortium made up of more than 6o universities and research institutions from the United States, Latin America and Australia. In the early 1960's, scientists from U.S. universities forged relationships with colleagues at the Universidad de Costa Rica in the interest of strengthening education and research in tropical biology. This led to the founding of OTS in 1963 in order to provide leadership in education, research and the use of natural resources in the tropics. The corporate headquarters of OTS is located at Duke University.

From the description of Organization for Tropical Studies Reference Collection, 1979-1988. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758676796

From the guide to the Organization for Tropical Studies Reference Collection, 1979-1988, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Signs and Symbols Reference Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources to be used for research and reference purposes.

From the description of Signs and Symbols Reference Collection, 1972-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 166230264

The Duke Employees Benevolent Society was formed in February 1965. It became affiliated with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), AFofL, in August, 1965, as Local 77. Collection contains materials, such as, newspaper clippings, flyers, publicly-distributed memoranda, form-letters, and agreement books pertaining to the organization and unionization of Duke's non-academic employees. The collection ranges in date from 1965-2001 with bulk dates of 1965-1979. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

From the guide to the Labor Unions Reference Collection, 1958-2001, (University Archives, Duke University)

Living Groups at Duke University are non-greek residential organizations which strive to provide a social and/or academic network for students. Some Living Groups are coeducational. Selective Living Groups require an application or rush to recruit new members, while Independent Living Groups maintain an open membership policy. Living Groups on campus are required to bring diverse programming to the University. This programming benefits both members and nonmembers of the living group with events that broaden the group members' experiences. Living groups are encouraged to foster faculty interaction; community service; educational, social, and cultural programming; and citizenship, scholarship, and leadership activities.

From the guide to the Living Groups collection, ., 1964-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University.)

Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, the University's largest undergraduate college, was formed in 1972 by a merger of Trinity College for Men (usually just called "Trinity College") and the Woman's College. "Trinity College" is the most common usage, with "Arts and Sciences" added on, as in the phrase "Arts & Sciences and Trinity College." The administrative structure has varied over time. For example, there has been a Dean of Arts and Sciences, and a separate Dean of Trinity College. At present, the college's chief officer is called "Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Dean of Trinity College."

From the description of Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Reference Collection, 1963-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 693872148

From the guide to the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Reference Collection, 1963-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Around January of 1922, Henry Belk, Class of 1923, was named director of the Trinity College News Service. Apparently Belk was the College's first staff member hired for a public relations position. For 1927/28, the Bulletin of the University lists Albert Alexander Wilkinson, Class of 1927, as Director of Publicity. In 1935, the news service became part of the Department of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs which was directed by Henry R. Dwire. Wilkinson managed the News Service until 1945. The Bureau of Public Information succeeded the News Service in 1947/48. In 1948, Charles E. Jordan was named Vice President in the Division of Public Relations; he served in that capacity until 1966. In 1956, Clarence Whitfield became director of the Bureau of Public Information reporting to Jordan. The office was responsible for the University's news, radio, and television publicity. Personnel included a news director, a radio-TV director, and several writers. The Office of Information Services succeeded the Bureau in 1963/64. A 1963 report by the Barton Gillet Company titled "Analysis and appraisal of communications, Duke University" probably played a role in the reorganization of the University's strategies in this area. Now (2010), the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations coordinates and manages communications strategies with the university's many audiences. It includes the offices responsible for federal, state and local government relations, local community affairs, campus news and communications and audiovisual services: Office of News and Communication; University Photography; Federal Relations; Office of Community Affairs; Government Relations. The Duke Medicine Office of News and Communications handles this function for the Duke University Medical Center.

From the guide to the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations Reference Collection, 1939-1998, (University Archives, Duke University)

This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

From the description of University File Reference Collection, 1960-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758676854

From the description of Environmentalism Reference Collection, 1970-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758676352

From the description of Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations Reference Collection, 1939-1998. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758676138

From the description of President Richard H. Brodhead Reference Collection, 2004-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758676989

From the description of University Reports Reference Collection, 1959-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758675524

From the description of Dining Services Reference Collection, 1945-2001. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191749309

From the description of Academic Rankings Reference Collection, 1980-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 159933828

From the description of Blue Devil Reference collection, 1972-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 159935304

From the description of University Policies Reference Collection, 1933-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 166326137

From the description of Libraries Reference Collection, 1972-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 164583361

From the description of Religious Life Reference Collection, 1937-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 166227811

From the description of Awards Reference Collection, 1879-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 159934507

From the description of Fuqua School of Business Reference Collection, 1968-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758674522

From the description of Firsts Reference Collection, 1906-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 758672388

Most of the negatives were produced by the Office of News and Communication's News Bureau in the early years of Duke University and later by University Photography (upon its establishment).

From the description of University Archives Photographic Negative Collection, 1855-1995. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 170967555

The Association of Independent Houses (AIH), established in the late 1960s, represented all independent freshman and undergraduate dormitories and residence halls on both East and West campuses. The AIH assisted with general management of extracurricular activities, managed large parties, and acted as a general advocate for on-campus student residents. The AIH included Buchanan, Canterbury, Lancaster, Lee, Manchester, Mirecourt, Tabard, Taylor, Warwick, Windsor, and York Houses, and B.O.G. (Bunch of Guys), an independent living group. AIH was disbanded in 1982 due to lack of house participation. The responsibilities of the AIH were absorbed by the Undergraduate Judicial Board.

From the guide to the Association of Independent Houses collection, ., 1966-1983, (University Archives, Duke University.)

Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) attended the Duke University School of Law from 1934 to 1937, graduating number three in a class of twenty-six. During his three years at Duke, Nixon was active in the Duke Bar Association and was elected President in his senior year.

From the description of Richard M. Nixon Reference Collection, 1934-1999. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191735472

The James B. Duke Society recognizes those individuals who have followed the example and generosity of Duke University's founder, James B. Duke, by continuing his vision through involvement and support, and by providing cumulative gifts exceeding $100,000 to all areas of Duke University.

From the description of James B. Duke Society Reference Collection, 1997-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 213434239

The Alumni Affairs Reference Collection was compiled over time by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

From the description of Alumni Affairs Reference Collection, 1950-[ongoing]. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191736983

Most of the negatives were produced by the Office of News and Communication's News Bureau in the early years of Duke University and later by University Photography (upon its establishment). The Office of News and Communication continues to work with the news media and others to highlight the activities of Duke's faculty, students and staff while University Photography documents the people and programs of Duke University, providing high-quality images for departments, special events, sports programs, the news media and others.

From the guide to the Duke University Archives Photographic Negative Collection, 1855-1995, (University Archives, Duke University)

Instruction in Forestry had been offered to Trinity College students since 1932. In 1938, the School of Forestry was founded as the first graduate school of forestry in the South. In the 1970s, the school began to expand its programs to include a broad range of resource and environmental studies. The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Duke University Marine Lab (both formed in 1938) came together in 1991 to become the School of Environment, which was named the Nicholas School of the Environment in 1995 following a $20 million gift from Peter M. and Ginny Nicholas of Boston. In 1997, the Department of Geology (formed in 1936) joined the school as the Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, bringing with it new resources and a new name for the school in December 2000-the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences.

From the description of School of the Environment Reference Collection, 1991-ongoing. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 213434830

The Program in Comparative Studies on Southern Asia was established to facilitate research on, and the training of graduate students in, the political, historical, economical and sociocultural development of Commonwealth countries in Southern Asia

From the description of Program in Comparative Studies on Southern Asia Reference Collection, 1965-[ongoing] (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191733206

In July 1981, Terry Sanford initiated negotiations with former U. S. President Richard Nixon (Duke Law '37) to locate the Nixon presidential library on the campus of Duke University, Nixon's alma mater. When this information was revealed to faculty members during the week of August 10, 1981, many opposed the proposition, citing Sanford's failure to consult the faculty prior to initiating negotiations.

Many who opposed the library had moral objections to memorializing a President whose behavior in office was reproachable, and they feared a negative effect on the university's reputation. Other concerns included the effects of increased tourist traffic on campus and the uncertain aesthetic nature of the proposed structure. However, supporters of the Nixon Library argued that the scholarly and academic benefits of locating the Nixon Presidential Materials collection on campus should and would outweigh other concerns. These supporters tended to denounce the actions of vocal dissenters as divisive and arrogant.

Meetings of the Academic Council and Board of Trustees during September and October 1981 were dominated by the Nixon Library debate, and a group of faculty formed the Committee Against the Nixon-Duke Library (CANDL) to organize the efforts of faculty, students, alumni, and others opposed to the proposed library. Although the Academic Council voted not to pursue further negotiations with former president Nixon in a 35-34 decision at a September 3, 1981 meeting, the Board of Trustees later voted 9-2 to proceed. By April 1982, negotiations had stalled. One year later, Nixon's representatives announced that a site at Chapman College in San Clemente, California, had been chosen for the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library.

From the guide to the Nixon Library Controversy Reference Collection, 1981-2001, (University Archives, Duke University)

  • 1948/1949: The position of Personnel Director first appeared in the University Bulletin. The appointee, Walter G. Cooper, reported to the Business Manager and Comptroller. The Personnel Department was given authority over all "employees of the University who are not directly connected in a professional capacity with its social or academic activities."
  • 1969/1970: The Personnel Department had the following structure: Director, Wage and Salary, Personnel Records, Employment Office, Medical Center Personnel, Training and Development, Cost Reduction
  • 1980 - 1982 : The Human Resources division was created and structured as follows: Director (an Assistant Vice President), Benefits and Records, Employee Relations, Employee Services, Wage and Salary, Human Resources Development, Employment Office, Labor Relations
  • 1997: Administration, Benefits Administration, Temporary Services, Employee Occupational Health Services, Learning/Training and Organizational Development, Rewards and Recognition [formerly Wage and Salary], Recruitment.
  • 2000: The Human Resources division became headed by a Vice President

From the guide to the Office of Human Resources Reference Collection, 1950-[ongoing], (University Archives, Duke University)

In 1937, planning for the 1938-1939 centennial celebration of Duke University was well underway. The Alumni Association contracted with the famed English firm of Josiah Wedgwood & Sons to produce a set of commemorative china plates. The first edition, three hundred sets of twelve plates, bore the signature of William Preston Few, Duke's President, on the back. A second unsigned edition was also produced. The plates are no longer made.

For more information, please see http://library.duke.edu/uarchives/history/dukeplates.html.

From the guide to the Duke University Wedgwood Plates Reference Collection, 1937-1938, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Nicholas School celebrates it creation date as 1991, but it represents a coming together of three entities that are almost as old as the university itself. The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Duke University Marine Lab (both formed in 1938) came together in 1991 to become the School of Environment, which was named the Nicholas School in 1995 following a $20 million gift from Peter M. and Ginny Nicholas of Boston.

In 1997, the Department of Geology (formed in 1936) joined the school as the Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, bringing with it new resources and a new name for the school in December 2000-the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. In December 2003, the Nicholases ended the Campaign for Duke with a $70 million pledge to the university, to help fund the design and construction of Nicholas Hall, the future home of the Nicholas School, as well as the launch of the affiliated Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. In August 2008, the school's name was shortened to the Nicholas School of the Environment, following approval by the Duke University Board of Trustees.

From the guide to the Nicholas School of the Environment Reference Collection, 1930-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

The history of integration at Duke University spans more than one hundred years. In 1896, Trinity College was the first white institution in the South to invite Booker T. Washington to speak on campus. In 1948, students of the Divinity School petitioned for the admission of African Americans to the university. It was only within the last forty years that university policies changed so that black people could become a part of the life of Duke University as students, faculty, and administrators. The Black History at Duke Reference Collection chronicles the events that were part of this change. The following timeline, partially adapted from the book Legacy, 1963-1993: Thirty Years of African-American Students at Duke University, gives a historical overview of some of the events that are documented in this collection.

  • March 8, 1961: The Board of Trustees announced that students would be admitted to the university graduate and professional schools without regard to race, creed, or national origin.
  • June 2, 1962: The Board of Trustees announced that undergraduate students would be admitted without regard to race.
  • Sept., 1963: Five black undergraduates entered Duke University as first year students.
  • 1966: Dr. Samuel DuBois Cook became Duke University's first black faculty member.
  • 1967: Three African Americans received their undergraduate degrees, as the first black students to graduate from Duke.
  • 1968: The Afro-American Society was established as the first black student association. Later, the name of the organization was to change first to Association of African Students and then, in 1976, to Black Student Alliance.
  • April 5 - 11, 1968 : One day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., hundreds of Duke students gathered in the quad, in a silent vigil, to protest Duke's discriminatory policies .
  • Oct., 1968: Black students presented the administration with twelve points of concern that included enrollment levels, the low number of black faculty members, and the continuing membership of key university officials in segregated facilities.
  • Feb. 13, 1969: Sixty members of the Afro-American Society occupied the Allen Building for eight hours and presented the university administration with a list of demands.
  • 1969: A Black Studies Program was instituted at Duke after much discussion and delay. Walter Burford was named program head in 1970.
  • 1969: The Office of Black Affairs was established. Later, its name was changed to Office of Minority Affairs, and, in 1993, to Office of Intercultural Affairs.
  • 1974: The university's first predominantly black fraternity, the Omega Zeta chapter of Omega Psi Phi, was founded.
  • Sept. 24, 1975: One hundred students protested and presented the administration with grievances and demands for action. Their priorities included departmentalization of the Black Studies Program and increasing the number of black faculty teaching black studies courses.
  • Sept., 1976: The Association of African Students was renamed the Black Student Alliance.
  • Nov. 7, 1979: The Black Student Alliance sponsored a Black Solidarity Day rally on campus.
  • 1983: The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture was established.
  • April 21, 1988: The Academic Council passed a resolution to adopt the Black Faculty Initiative, to mandate the hiring of more black faculty in each dept.
  • April 21, 1989: Students marched from East to West Campus in support of National Black Student Action Day.
  • Sept. 26, 1997: Class boycott and Allen Building study-in held to observe Race Day.
  • March 19, 2001: An advertisement entitled Ten Reasons Why Reparations for Slavery is a Bad Idea - And Racist Too by David Horowitz ran in the Chronicle. Students protested the printing of the advertisement in the student newspaper.

From the guide to the Black History at Duke Reference Collection, 1948 - 2001 and undated, (University Archives, Duke University)

The Duke University Debate Team was formed around 1897 at Trinity College (now Duke University). The team hosted many tournaments against regional colleges and universities, and traveled to compete in regional and national events. English Professor Joseph C. Wetherby was the longtime coach of the team, from about 1947 until 1976. Wetherby was also an officer in the Speech Association of America (now the Speech Communication Association). Under Professor Wetherby's direction, the Duke University Debate Team won state, regional, and national honors.

In 1954, the Speech Association of America announced a national topic that would test Duke University's tradition of academic freedom: "Resolved: That the United States should extend diplomatic recognition to the Communist government of China." In preparation for competition, Edwin Chapman, Jr., a Duke University freshman from Newport News, Va., wrote his congressman, Representative Edward J. Robeson, Jr., requesting information on the topic. Robeson promptly replied, expressing amazement "that such a topic ... was even seriously considered by any group of persons who are normally intelligent and responsibly informed." He advised Chapman not to debate the positive position "as quotations from your statements may embarrass you for the rest of your life." Additionally, the congressman requested the names of the Debate Club faculty advisor at Duke and the members of the National Debating Council.

Shortly following that correspondence, Professor Wetherby warned his fellow coaches of possible trouble with the debate topic in the regional newsletter of Tau Kappa Alpha, the national forensic honor society. Before long, the Associated Press had reported the Duke incident along with a growing nationwide controversy. The biggest story concerned President Eisenhower being questioned about directives from the Secretaries of the Army and Navy forbidding the teams at West Point and Annapolis from debating the topic.

In support of uncensored discussion, Professor Wetherby appeared on a See It Now television show with Wayne C. Eubank of the University of New Mexico, President of Tau Kappa Alpha. Immediately after the program, Wetherby began receiving mostly favorable letters and telegrams from throughout the country. The president of Duke University, A. Hollis Edens, understood the significance of the issue, and did not interfere with either the student group or its faculty advisor. The Speech Association of American ultimately retained the debate topic and students participated in the national competition with no major conflicts.

Other events in team history during the 1960s include a May 1960 appearance on the nationally-televised College Bowl. A subset of the Debate Team competed on the show, winning against Antioch College and Michigan State University. In 1964, two Duke University Debate Team members went to the Federal Penitentiary in Atlanta, Ga. to debate with prisoners on the topics of "Resolved: that the federal government should guarantee an opportunity for higher education to all qualified high school graduates." In 1966, the team won the national collegiate championship, after sixteen rounds of debates against Butler University and Vanderbilt University. Duke University also had an all-women debate team for a brief time.

The Duke University chapter of Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha, the intercollegiate forensics honor society, was established around 1916. The honor society is devoted to the ideals of public speaking and forensics excellence. Membership in the honor society allows Duke University to participate in elite competitions.

As of 2003, the Debate Team (now Duke Debate) is active at Duke University.

From the guide to the Debate Team Records, (bulk, ), 1903-1981, 1948-1976, (University Archives, Duke University.)

The American Dance Festival (ADF) is committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers and professionals in dance-related fields. Remaining true to the goals of its founding artists, ADF's programs are developed based on its mission to: encourage and support the creation of new modern dance work by both established and emerging choreographers; preserve our modern dance heritage through continued presentation of classic works, as well as through archival efforts; build wider national and international audiences for modern dance; enhance public understanding and appreciation of the art form and its cultural and historical significance; provide a sound scientific/aesthetic base for professional education and training of young dancers and a forum for integrating and disseminating information on dance education.

In July 1934, the small town of Bennington, Vermont became the site of the Bennington School of Dance -- the precursor of the American Dance Festival. It was the laboratory in which four of the great modern dance second-generation pioneers (Martha Graham, Hanya Holm, Doris Humphrey, and Charles Weidman) could experiment, train students, and create the early works that made modern dance one of the great cultural triumphs of the twentieth century.

The Festival, directed by Martha Hill and Mary Josephine Shelly, remained in Bennington until 1942 (with a one-year sojourn to Mills College, California, in 1939). Despite the onset of World War II, Martha Graham spent the summers of 1943-1945 in residence in Bennington, and in 1946 Jos Limn brought his first company to Bennington. In 1947, Martha Hill initiated a pilot program at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut, for dance teachers, college dance groups, and young dancers. Due to the success of that pilot program, the Connecticut College School of Dance/American Dance Festival opened officially in 1948. For the 1969 season the name became simply the American Dance Festival, and has been directed by Charles L. Reinhart ever since. In 1978, the ADF took over the sprawling green lawns, studios, offices, and dormitories of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

[Historical note adapted from the American Dance Festival web site.]

From the guide to the American Dance Festival Reference Collection, ., 1977 - 2000, (University Archives, Duke University)

Duke University, located in Durham, N.C., was established by James B. Duke in 1924, but it evolved from the following institutions in Randolph County, N.C.: Brown's Schoolhouse, 1838-1839; Union Institute, 1839-1851; Normal College, 1851-1859; and Trinity College, 1859-1892. In 1892, Trinity College relocated from Randolph Co. to the present location of Duke's East Campus in Durham, N.C. Because of this complex history, the University has celebrated anniversaries of two major founding events: the establishment of continuous education at Brown's Schoolhouse in 1838, and the creation of the Duke Endowment, which transformed Trinity College into Duke University in 1924. As a result, the institution commemorated the 100th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1938, the 50th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1974, the 150th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1988, and the 75th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1999.

In 1838, Methodist and Quaker families in rural Randolph County, N.C. employed Brantley York as a permanent teacher for their subscription school in Brown's Schoolhouse. One hundred years later, Duke University commemorated the 100th Anniversary of its humble beginnings during the 1938/1939 academic year. The Centennial Celebration, a three-day event featuring ceremonies, symposia, lectures, and performances, took place April 21-23, 1939.

During the 1974/1975 academic year, Duke University celebrated the 50th anniversary of its founding. On December 11, 1924, James Buchanan Duke signed an Indenture of Trust creating the Duke Endowment, which established Duke University. The 50th Anniversary Celebration took place the weekend of April 11-13, 1975. Events included a film festival, concerts, convocation, reception, service of worship, and symposia.

Faculty, students, alumni and friends of Duke University travelled to Randolph County, North Carolina, in September 1988, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Duke's beginnings as a log schoolhouse about 75 miles west of Durham, N.C. Celebration events included a dedication of the Archdale-Trinity Historical Society Museum, birthday parties, tours, lectures, and a symposium.

During the 1999/2000 academic year, Duke University celebrated the 75th anniversary of James B. Duke's creation of the Duke Endowment -- the fund that transformed Trinity College into Duke University. The annual Founder's Day celebration, observed on Sept. 30, 1999, commemorated the Endowment with a series of events focusing on the University's ties to the Duke family.

From the guide to the Duke University Anniversaries Collection, ., 1937 - 2000, (University Archives, Duke University)

timeline excerpted from Duke Medical Center Archives http://archives.mc.duke.edu/history/timeline.html

In 1924, James Buchanan Duke established the Duke Endowment and directed that 6 million of the endowment be used to transform Trinity College into Duke University. He made an additional bequest to the Endowment and the University, in 1925, which included $4 million towards the establishment of a medical school, hospital and nurses home.

  • 1927: Dr. Wilburt Cornell Davison elected Dean of the Duke University School of Medicine and Hospital on 21 January. Construction begins on the Medical School and Duke Hospital.
  • 1929: 3,000 applicants apply to the new medical school. 70 first- and third-year students are selected, including four women.
  • 1930: Duke Hospital opens July 20, 1930, attracting 25,000 visitors. Classes began in Hospital Administration, dietetics, and medical technology on 15 August. The eighteen third year and thirty first year medical students began classes on 2 October.
  • 1931: The Duke School of Nursing's first class of 24 undergraduate students begin classes January 2. Private Diagnostic Clinics were organized 15 September.
  • 1935: The Association of American Medical Colleges ranks Duke among the top 25 percent of medical schools in the country-less than five years after it opened.
  • 1936: Duke surgeons led by Dr. J. Deryl Hart pioneer the use of ultraviolet lamps in operating rooms to eliminate infectious organisms that cause post-operative Staph infections. This procedure dramatically reduces the number of infections and related deaths.
  • 1937: Dr. Joseph Beard developed a vaccine against equine encephalomyelitis. Duke establishes the nation's first brain tumor program, launching what will become one of the world's foremost cancer programs.
  • 1940: First wing added to Duke Hospital. For his studies of the metabolism of the tubercle bacillus, which eventually led to effective medications, pharmacologist Frederick Bernheim is nominated for the Nobel Prize.
  • 1940s - 1950s : Dr. Walter Kempner's research, using a rice-based diet and daily laboratory testing, demonstrates that degenerative processes attacking the kidney, heart, brain and retina can be arrested by dietary changes. These dramatic findings draw patients to Duke from across the nation.
  • 1955: Psychiatrist Ewald W. Busse establishes the Duke University Center for Aging, the first research center of its kind in the nation. Now the oldest continuously running aging center in the United States, the Duke Center for Aging has pioneered long-term studies of health problems among the elderly.
  • 1959: Duke develops a machine that lowers patients' blood temperatures below 68 degrees Fahrenheit and is the first to place a patient under this deep hypothermia during open-heart surgery.
  • 1963: First African-American student admitted to Duke University School of Medicine.
  • 1980: The new $94.5 million, 616-bed Duke Hospital opens, bringing the total number of patient beds to more than 1,000.
  • 1992: Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center develops the nation's first outpatient bone-marrow transplantation program.
  • 1998: The Duke University Health System - an integrated academic health care system serving a broad area of central North Carolina - is officially created as Duke establishes partnerships with Durham Regional Hospital, Raleigh Community Hospital, and other regional health care providers. DUHS today includes three hospitals, ambulatory care and surgery clinics, primary care medical practice clinics, home health services, hospice services, physician practice affiliations, managed care providers and other related facilities and services.

From the guide to the Duke University Medical Center Reference Collection, 1941-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

taken from Pratt School of Engineering website: http://www.pratt.duke.edu/about/history.php

The Pratt School of Engineering traces its history back to 1851 when Normal College, a forerunner of Duke University, advertised a Classical course which included engineering for seniors. Normal College became Trinity College in 1859 and engineering was introduced in 1887 and became a regular course offering in 1903.

When Trinity became Duke University in 1924, engineering underwent vigorous development.

  • 1927: Civil and Electrical Engineering departments were established. Classrooms/labs located in Asbury building on East campus. Engineering students were housed in Southgate building on East campus.
  • 1931: Mechanical Engineering department established.
  • 1937: Departments of CE, EE, and ME were administratively grouped to form the Division of Engineering.
  • 1939: The University incorporated the Division of Engineering into the College of Engineering.
  • 1946: First women to graduate from the College of Engineering: Muriel Theodorsen Williams (EE) and Marie Foote Reel (EE).
  • 1947: Male Engineering students relocated to West Campus.
  • 1948: College of Engineering moves to West Campus and begins classes in new Engineering Building (Old Red), now Hudson Hall.
  • 1960: Doctor of Philosophy degree first offered in Electrical Engineering.
  • 1964: Doctor of Philosophy first offered in Civil Engineering.
  • 1966: College of Engineering changed to School of Engineering.
  • 1968: First black engineers to graduate from School of Engineering: Kenneth Spaulding Chestnut (CE) and Alfred J. Hooks (ME).
  • 1971: Department of Biomedical Engineering established — First BME Department established at a university in the United States — set the stage nationally for other BME Departments.
  • 1984: Nello L. Teer Library Building opens.
  • 1992: Engineering building, (Old Red) named Hudson Hall to honor Fitzgerald S. "Jerry" Hudson E'46.
  • 1994: Levine Science Research Center opens.
  • 1999: Kristina M. Johnson becomes first woman dean. Duke University School of Engineering named the Edmund T. Pratt Jr. School of Engineering for Edmund T. Pratt Jr. E'47.
  • 2004: Construction was completed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine and Applied Sciences in August. Pratt hosts dedication on November 18, 2004. Duke's Board of Trustees approve renaming CIEMAS in honor of Michael and Patty Fitzpatrick. CIEMAS is now formally known as the Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine and Applied Sciences, informally dubbed the Fitzpatrick Center.

From the guide to the School of Engineering Reference Collection, 1913-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

One of the long-standing traditions of Trinity College and Duke University is the observance of honoring the benefactors of the institution. The practice was formalized by the Board of Trustees on June 4, 1901, when October 3 was designated as Benefactors' Day in honor of Washington Duke.

The original intent "to honor Washington Duke forever" has been kept in spirit but through the years the name and even date of the annual observance has changed. It has been called Benefactors' Day (1901-1924), Duke University Day (1926-1947), and since 1948, Founders' Day. The most common forms of recognition have been an address on campus, the laying of a wreath at the tombs of the Dukes, and for many years the planting of trees by the senior class presidents to beautify the campus. The day has been the occasion for the presentation of special donations and awards, the dedication of buildings or gifts such as the Flentrop Organ in 1976, and the awarding of honorary degrees.

After the creation of Duke University, the date shifted to December 11 in honor of the signing of the Indenture of The Duke Endowment. The new Duke University Day was largely a product of the Office of Alumni Affairs. Local alumni chapters were encouraged to meet on December 11 to elect officers and to hear what could be characterized as a "state of the university" report. These meetings grew from ten in North Carolina and Virginia in 1926 to a high of over sixty nationwide in 1936. In 1927 the first meeting was held in New York City, and in 1930 the first Alumni chapter was organized in Los Angeles. In 1931 there also were observances in China and Japan. These meetings were greatly curtailed from 1939 to 1945.

After 1948 primary attention returned to campus where prominent speakers were featured along with significant announcements to the University community. In 1967 the annual event was shifted to the Sunday nearest December 11 with the primary focus on the morning worship service in the Chapel. In 1986 that observance was extended to a long weekend beginning with a formal campus-wide Convocation on Thursday immediately following an annual meeting of the faculty.

With the 1997 celebration, the ceremonies were again moved, back to a date in the early Fall. The events of the weekend include a memorial for members of the community deceased during the year passed, recognition of outstanding students, faculty, and staff, and the presentations of awards for teaching, the Distinguished Alumni Award, and the University Medal for Distinguished Meritorious Service at Duke.

From the guide to the Founders' Day Reference Collection, 1902-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

On the morning of February 13, 1969, between 50 and 75 black students entered the Allen Building and proceeded to barricade and occupy it. They renamed the building the Malcolm X Liberation School. The students issued a list of demands to the administration, [which included an accredited African-American Studies Department, a black dorm, a black student union, an increase in enrollment and financial support for black students, protection from police harassment, and better working conditions for non-academic staff of the University]. Provost Marcus Hobbs read a statement to the students at about 3:30 PM, urging them to leave the building within one hour to begin a peaceful discussion of the issues. Sometime after 5 o'clock, after a warning from Provost Hobbs that they would face legal ramifications for staying, the students decided to exit. Although the exit was peaceful, a large crowd of mostly white students had gathered outside the building during the day, and this crowd and the police became entangled. The police fired tear gas on the students.

Immediately following the police action, students met to discuss how to proceed. Many students and faculty were upset by the administration's support of the police action; other students and faculty felt that the takeover of the Allen Building was lawless and disruptive. Those who supported the Takeover called for a three day strike on campus and offered alternative classes. Students opposed to the Takeover urged fellow students to attend classes as normal. The administration attempted to calm the campus and address some of the demands posed by the Takeover participants. President Knight addressed Duke on the campus radio station, WDBS.

Afro-American Society and administration members met several times to begin forming an African-American Studies program. The two parties could not reach an agreement on what type of committee should oversee the program. On March 10, a group of students marched to downtown Durham along with students from other colleges to protest the situation. The next day, March 11, 1969, students again went to downtown Durham and marched with other students and Durham residents. The march turned violent, with store windows smashed and other damage to property. The mayor put a curfew on the city for several days.

Dozens of Duke's black students threatened to leave campus following the lack of agreement on the African-American Studies program. They instead planned to attend the Malcolm X Liberation University, a newly-developed school led by community activist Howard Fuller. However, the students soon reversed their decision and decided to remain at Duke University. On March 19, a University Hearing Committee found the students who had occupied the building guilty of violating university regulations. All defendants were sentenced to one year of probation.

[Written by Valerie Gillispie as part of the web exhibit, Campus Protest: Duke University, 1967-1969. ]

From the guide to the Allen Building Takeover Collection, 1969-2002, (University Archives, Duke University)

Fraternities and sororities have historically been a large part of campus life at Duke University by sponsoring inter-campus events, hosting parties, and performing community service. They are known for providing leadership opportunities and fostering a sense of belonging among a large student body. The first fraternities and sororities on campus were a part of Trinity College (1859-1924), the precursor to Duke University. The earliest fraternity chapter on campus was the Xi Chapter of Alpha Tau Omega, chartered in 1872 (at Trinity College, then located in Randolph County, N.C.). The earliest sorority chapter on campus (then Trinity College) was the Omicron Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, chartered in 1911.

Fraternities and sororities at Duke are governed by the Interfraternity Council, the National Pan-Hellenic Council, and the Panhellenic Association. There also exist cultural Greek letter organizations which are not formally governed. The Interfraternity Council at Duke University is the local umbrella organization for national fraternities at Duke University. The National Pan-Hellenic Council serves as the governing body for historically African American fraternities and sororities at Duke University. The Duke Panhellenic Association is the organizing body of the National Panhellenic Council sororities on campus.

From the guide to the Fraternities and Sororities collection, ., 1931-2001, (University Archives, Duke University.)

The origins of the Duke University Press date back to 1892 and the establishment of the Trinity College Historical Society; in 1921 the Trinity College Press was officially founded. William T. Laprade served as the first Director until 1926. That same year, the Duke University Press was founded with William K. Boyd as Director.

Duke Press publishes both scholarly books and journals, primarily in the humanities and the social sciences. In the Press's early years, preference was given to works published by faculty, graduate students, and alumni; and to works focused on the "region south of the Potomac." As the University has grown and diversified, so has the Press; now it is best known for its publications in the broad and interdisciplinary area of theory and history of cultural production. By 1949 the press published 3-5 journals and 5-15 books per year. Currently (2008), Duke University Press publishes approximately 120 books annually and more than 30 journals. This places the Press's books publishing program among the twenty largest at American university presses, and the journals publishing program among the five largest.

From the guide to the Duke University Press Reference Collection, 1922-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

timeline excerpted from School of Law's A History of Duke Law School http://www.law.duke.edu/history/index

  • 1850: Braxton Craven, President of Normal (later Trinity) College, in Randolph County, North Carolina, the predecessor of Duke University, inaugurates lectures on Political and Natural Law as part of a liberal arts curriculum; in 1855 these are supplemented by lectures on Constitutional and International Law.
  • 1865: The Law Department is established as one of eleven academic departments in Trinity College.
  • 1868: A separate School of Law is organized to offer professional training.
  • 1882: The School of Law closes and legal instruction is discontinued following President Craven's death.
  • 1887: Legal instruction is resumed as an academic course in the History Department.
  • 1891: Trinity College moves from Randolph County to Durham, and the School of Law is reopened with Justice A. C. Avery of the North Carolina Supreme Court as its Dean. No undergraduate work is required for admission to the two-year program leading to the LL.B degree.
  • 1894: The Law School closes and legal instruction is discontinued for financial reasons.
  • 1904: James Buchanan Duke and Benjamin Newton Duke provide the endowment to reopen the School of Law, and Samuel Fox Mordecai, a Raleigh attorney and part-time law teacher at Wake Forest College, is appointed Senior Professor of Law.
  • 1905: Professor Mordecai, who has been named Dean, initiates a reorganization of the School of Law, which is housed on the second floor of the East Duke Building. Trinity is admitted to membership in the Association of American Law Schools. Trinity withdraws from membership in 1919
  • 1924: Duke University is created, and Trinity College becomes its undergraduate school for men.
  • 1927: The School of Law moves into renovated quarters in the Carr Building on the newly rebuilt East Campus. Dean Mordecai dies, and W. Bryan Bolich is named Acting Dean. Miriam Cox, a Duke Woman's College graduate and court reporter, is the first woman student admitted to Duke Law School.
  • 1930: The School of Law moves into its new building on the Main Quadrangle of the West Campus.Justin Miller, Dean of the Law School of the University of Southern California, is appointed Dean, and the faculty is substantially enlarged. Duke is readmitted to membership in the Association of American Law Schools.
  • 1931: The Duke Bar Association, closely modeled on the American Bar Association, is established by the law students to: "1) foster legal science, 2) maintain the honor and dignity of the legal profession among law students, 3) cultivate professional ethics and social intercourse among its members, and 4) promote the welfare of the Law School of Duke University."
  • 1932: Clinical legal education is introduced into the curriculum with the establishment of the Duke Legal Aid Clinic, the first law school-connected program of its kind in the country.
  • 1938: Dean Horack oversees the construction of five log cabins on the northern edge of the West Campus. Built to help alleviate the shortage of housing for law students, they are used as dormitory and recreational facilities. The cabins are less Spartan than their name implies, and have electricity, central heating and indoor plumbing.
  • 1951: The Law School building is now too small, and lacks space to house the Law Library (now over 100,000 volumes). Dean McClain receives a commitment of $250,000 from the University Trustees towards a new, modern law building.
  • 1959: The Duke Legal Aid Clinic closes and clinical legal education is discontinued.
  • 1961: The first African-American students are admitted.
  • 1962 - 63 : The School of Law moves into its new building on Towerview Road and Science Drive. The Honorable Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States, is the principal speaker at the dedication ceremony on Law Day, 1963.
  • 1966: To protest the North Carolina Bar Association's denial of membership to an African-American graduate of the Law School, the faculty approves a resolution by a 2-1 margin to sever ties with the Bar Association until applicants are accepted without discrimination based on race. The Law School re-establishes its connection with the Bar Association in 1969.
  • 1967: The MD/JD program, the Law School's first joint degree program, is inaugurated under co-sponsorship with the Medical School. This program is followed in later years by joint degree programs under co-sponsorship with the Business School, the Institute of Public Policy, the School of the Environment, the Engineering School, and the Graduate School (in disciplines, including anthropology, economics, English, history, philosophy, political science, Romance studies, and humanities).
  • 1968: The LLB degree is replaced by the JD as the basic professional degree. Small-section instruction is introduced in conjunction with an intensive research and writing program in all first-year courses.The Legal Aid Clinic is re-activated; clinical legal education is reintroduced into the curriculum in 1972.
  • 1985 - 86 : The JD/LLM (International and Comparative Law) combined degree program, the first of its kind in the country, is inaugurated.The LLM program for foreign-trained lawyers is expanded and rapidly grows; in the 2007-2008 academic year there are over 80 international students at Duke Law and almost 1,000 international alumni.
  • 1991: A voluntary Pro Bono program is established with 44 students providing assistance to programs in the Durham community; by the 2006-2007 academic year there are 368 students enrolled in 576 pro bono placements.
  • 1993: The Center on Law, Ethics, and National Security is founded; by 2006 the Law School supports centers and programs devoted to the study of a variety of issues: • Center for Environmental Solutions (launched in 2005) • Center for Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy (established in 2002 as part of the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, a multi-disciplinary, campus-wide network of centers and programs) • Center for International and Comparative Law (founded 2006) • Center for the Study of the Public Domain and Program in Intellectual Property (created in 2002) • Global Capital Markets Center (established in 1998, in cooperation with the Fuqua School of Business) • Program in Public Law (founded in 1997).
  • 1995: Clinical education at the Law School is revived with the Death Penalty Clinic; other clinics are soon established:• AIDS Legal Project (1996)• Animal Law Project (2005)• Children's Law Clinic (2002)• Community Enterprise Clinic (2002)• Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (2007)• Guantanamo Defense Clinic (2005)• Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (2006)
  • 2002: The "Great Lives in the Law" lecture series, sponsored by the Duke Program in Public Law, is inaugurated by William H. Rehnquist, Chief Justice of the United States. Subsequent speakers include: civil rights lawyer Julius Chambers (2002), Justice Anthony Kennedy (2002), Justice Sandra Day O'Connor (2003), Dennis W. Archer, president of the American Bar Association (2003), Richard Goldstone, former Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa (2004), historian John Hope Franklin (2004), Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (2005), former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno (2005), and Linda Greenhouse, Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times (2006).

From the guide to the School of Law Reference Collection, 1930-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Sparked by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968, Duke University students organized a peaceful protest for racial equality that left few students, faculty, administrators or employees unaffected. Up to 1,400 students slept on the Chapel Quad, food services and housekeeping employees went on strike, and most students boycotted the dining halls in support of the employees.

That he sign an advertisement to be published in the Durham Morning Herald calling for a day of mourning; That he press for the $1.60 wage for University employees; That he resign from the then-segregated Hope Valley Country Club; That he appoint a committee of students, faculty and workers to make recommendations concerning collective bargaining and union recognition at Duke.

Knight met the students and faculty members on his front lawn, and the group entered his house. While Knight negotiated with the group's leaders, the rest of the students sat in the hallway and sang protest songs. The students spent the night in the president's house at his invitation. Saturday afternoon, Knight attended and spoke at a memorial service for King in Duke Chapel. Following the service, 350 students and faculty marched to Knight's home to support the students still inside the house. Knight promised to release an official statement within 72 hours, but Vice President for Student Affairs William Griffith and Knight's physician William Anlyan told the group the president was about to collapse from exhaustion and could no longer participate in the negotiations.

The Duke Vigil officially began the next morning, Sunday, April 7, as protesters moved onto Chapel Quad. Coordinators demanded strict adherence to a set of rules for the demonstration. In their straight rows of 50 people, the students were not allowed to talk to each other or the press. Rigidly ordered, the quad protest was meant to symbolize the non-violent intentions of the group. The leaders continued their discussions with administrators, and Sunday night 546 people slept on the quad. Boycotts continued, and by Tuesday night more than 1,400 demonstrators assembled for the Vigil. Folk singer Joan Baez spoke to the rally, and Senator Robert Kennedy sent a telegram of support to the students.

The next day, Wednesday, professor Samuel DuBois Cook addressed the students, and then Wright Tisdale, chair of the Board of Trustees, told the crowd the trustees and students shared the same concerns. He said the University would begin paying a $1.60 minimum wage and mentioned Knight's proposed committee to examine racial concerns. Following his remarks, Tisdale linked hands with the student protesters and joined in the singing of "We Shall Overcome." The demonstrators filed into Page Auditorium, where professors read an Academic Council resolution and tried to persuade the students to end the protest since the Board of Trustees had met the major part of their demands. The students agreed to drop their insistence on Knight's Durham Morning Herald advertisement and resignation from Hope Valley Country Club. After midnight on Thursday, April 11, 1968, the students decided to continue their boycott of the dining halls and pledged to support the workers' union, as they brought the demonstration to an end.

[Portions of this text from 'Profound History': Students answered violence with the Silent Vigil by Laura Trivers, published in The Chronicle, April 4, 1988.]

From the guide to the Duke Vigil Collection, ., 1968 - 1988, (University Archives, Duke University)

The mission of the Division of Student Affairs is to promote and enrich students' education through teaching, mentoring, advising, and counseling by way of on-going direct contact with students in their every day lives. The division was created in the summer of 1979 and was placed in under the supervision of William J. Griffiths, Vice President for Student Affairs. Griffith retired in 1991 and was succeeded by Janet S. Dickerson. Jim Clack became interim Vice President for Student Affairs when Janet Dickerson left in July of 2000 for Princeton University. The current (2011) Vice President of Student Affairs, Larry Moneta, accepted the position in 2001.

Student Affairs is comprised of a multitude of departments, all of which work in tandem to support and enrich students' educational experiences during their time at Duke University. These departments include: Campus Life; Career Center; Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS); Dean of Students Office; Residence Life and Housing Services; Student Health Center; and Resource Administration.

From the guide to the Division of Student Affairs Reference Collection, 1987-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Han Chiao-shun (Charles "Charlie" Jones Soong) was Trinity College's first international student. Born in the Wench'ang district of the island of Hainan, off the coast of the Kwangtung province of China in 1866, he was the youngest of three boys. Around 1875, he was sent off to the East Indies with one of his brothers to find work. Three years later he was adopted by a childless maternal uncle and taken to the United States where his name was changed to Soon Chai-Jui.

Upon arriving in the United States, the young Soong worked in his uncle's tea and silk shop in Boston. He then became a cabin boy in the Coast Guard where he met Captain Eric Gabrielson. Gabrielson, a devout Methodist, talked to Song about Christianity and took him to church whenever they were in port. On November 7, 1880 Charles Jones Soon (the final "g" was not added until his return to China in 1886) was baptized at the Fifth Street Methodist Church in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Soong, who had expressed interest in securing an education and returning to China as a missionary, received aid from General Julian S. Carr of Durham who financed his education at Trinity College, Duke University's forerunner. Soong spent close to two years (April 1881-fall 1882) at Trinity as a "special and preparatory student" where he studied under Dr. Braxton Craven, Trinity's president. In the fall of 1882 he entered the theological seminary of Vanderbilt University.

In January 1886, Soong arrived in Shanghai as a missionary under the auspices of the North Carolina Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church (South). Soong continued to serve as a missionary until 1892 when he resigned and went into private enterprise. Although, no longer a missionary Soong continued to be a "devout and active Christian" founding the YMCA in China, working with the American Bible Society in Shaghai, teaching Sunday school classes, and providing generous financial support.

In addition to being a lay leader and a businessman, Charles Jones Soong and his family are often regarded as "republican China's first family." Although the exact extents of his participation in the revolutionary movement are undocumented, he was known to be an ardent supporter and close friend of Sun Yat-sen. His daughter Ch'ing-ling married Sun Yat-sen. His remianing children (all educated in the United States) continued to play a role in Chinese history. One daughter married Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek. The third daughter married the Chinese finance minister (said to be the richest man in the world). One of Soong's sons became the Chinese prime minister, another was chairman of the bank of Canton, and the third became an international financier.

From the guide to the Charles Jones Soong Reference Collection, 1882-1995, (University Archives, Duke University)

taken from Undergraduate Publications Board homepage http://www.duke-union.org/About_UPB?

Since 1924, the Undergraduate Publications Board, commonly referred to as the Pub Board or UPB, has overseen the production of each of the university's recognized publications (with the exception of The Chronicle and Towerview). The Board also approves and supports emerging publications, known as Independents, runs the Blackburn Literary Festival, and administers the John Spencer Bassett Fund. Its continuing mission is to provide diverse forums in which students can engage their creative, intellectual, political and literary faculties.

Currently (2007), the UPB oversees the production of eleven publications: The Archive; Blind Spot; Carpe Noctem; The Chanticleer; Duke Blue; Erudito; Latent Image; Matter Magazine; Vertices; Passport Magazine; and Woman's Handbook. A sampling of other titles produced during the UPB's history include: Tobacco Road; Prometheus Black; Missing Link, Jabberwocky; and Teacher-Course Evaluation Book.

From the guide to the Undergraduate Publications Board Reference Collection, 1893-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

History from the Duke Chapel website http://www.chapel.duke.edu/building/history.html

When James B. Duke selected the site for Duke University's West Campus, in 1925, he chose to locate the Chapel on the site's highest ridge. The Chapel was the first building planned for the new campus, but the last one to be completed. Construction started in 1930, was completed in 1935, and cost nearly $2.3 million. The Chapel began to be used before its stained-glass windows and other details were finished; commencement was held in the Chapel in 1932.

Although the Chapel was inspired by other buildings, including English cathedrals and the chapels of other American universities, it is not a copy of any other specific building. The architect was Julian Abele, chief designer with the Horace Trumbauer firm, of Philadelphia. America's first black architect of renown, Abele was educated at the University of Pennsylvania and in France. In addition to Duke's original West Campus, he designed the Georgian buildings on Duke's East Campus. Abele's other designs include the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Harvard's Widener Library, and mansions for James B. Duke.

From the guide to the Chapel Reference Collection, 1933-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

Chronology

1936 - Office of Religious Activities established

1938 - Duke University Church (non-denominational) founded; disbanded 1985

1956 - Duke University Religious Council founded

1985 - Congregation at Duke University founded

From the guide to the Religious Life Reference collection, 1937-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

taken from the Pratt School of Engineering development page http://www.pratt.duke.edu/development/major_gifts.php

The James B. Duke Society recognizes those individuals who have followed the example and generosity of Duke University's founder, James B. Duke, by continuing his vision through involvement and support, and by providing cumulative gifts exceeding $100,000 to all areas of Duke University.

To acknowledge membership in the James B. Duke Society, the University commissioned Tiffany and Company to create a limited edition porcelain box inspired by the original architect's drawings of the West Campus Union and dormitory buildings. Each member of the James B. Duke Society receives one of these "special" boxes and is invited to Duke's annual gala donor recognition weekend.

At the conclusion of 2006-2007 the James B. Duke Society numbered 3156 members.

From the guide to the James B. Duke Society Reference Collection, 1997-ongoing, (University Archives, Duke University)

  • 1927: East Union opens – Board Cafeteria; "Dope Shop" snack bar opens in Crowell building
  • 1930: West Union opens – 2 a la carte cafeterias
  • 1946: Ted Minah becomes Food Services Director (1946-1974)
  • 1957: Gilbert-Addoms Hall opens – Board Cafeteria
  • 1965: the independent union, the Duke Employee Benevolent society was organized (February 1965); they affiliated with the AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees)in Sept. 1965
  • 1972: Merger of Woman's College and Trinity College
  • 1974: Central Campus apartment completed – no dining facilities
  • 1980: Mandatory Board eliminated on East Campus; electronic debit account implemented
  • 1982: Bryan Center completed (1983 – first privatization initiative)
  • 1984: Duke Card/non-traditional dining options available; enhancement projects completed on Central Campus bringing Uncle Harry's and The Pub.
  • 1989: Dining Facilities retrenched to East Union – food court/cafeteria renovation; Gilbert-Addoms facility closed; "Dope Shop"closed
  • 1993: First franchise brand (Li'l Dino Subs) and first national brand (Burger King) installed
  • 1994: Levine Science Resource Center (LSRC) Dining Hall opens.
  • 1995: the Marketplace on East Campus opens
  • 2000: The Loop opens its doors; McDonald's opens in the Bryan Center
  • 2001: Duke selects ARAMARK corp. to manage food services at eight campus dining locations including the Great Hall and the Marketplace
  • 2005: The Refectory, a “green” environment-friendly eatery, opens in the Divinity School
  • 2006: the Compass Group replaces ARAMARK as the dining management company.
  • 2007: In July, the operation of West Campus' main dining area switched hands from Chartwells to Bon Appetit, a branch of the Compass Group; Faculty Commons changes its name to Upstairs@The Commons, and opens its doors to students.

From the guide to the Dining Services Reference Collection, 1945-2001, (University Archives, Duke University)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
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creatorOf Nixon Library Controversy Reference Collection, 1981-2001 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Arts at Duke Reference Collection, circa 1910-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Events Reference Collection, 1903-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Graduate School Reference Collection, 1958-ongoing Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Freshman Life Reference Collection, 1946-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Academics and Research Reference Collection, 1851-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Student Activism Reference Collection, 1934-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Association of Independent Houses collection, 1966-1983. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf University Reports Reference Collection, 1959-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University Union Reference Collection, 1962-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Nicholas School of the Environment Reference Collection, 1930-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Admissions Reference Collection, 1949-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Songs and Cheers Reference Collection, 1913-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Christmas Cards Reference Collection, 1940s-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Debate Team Records, (bulk, ), 1903-1981, 1948-1976 University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Founders' Society Reference Collection, 1980-1997 University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf University Archives Postcard Collection, 1905-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Religious Life Reference collection, 1937-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Duke Endowment Reference Collection, 1964-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Division of Student Affairs Reference Collection, 1987-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Convocations Reference Collection, 1937-ongoing Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Auxiliary Services Reference Collection, 1912-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Women's Studies Program Reference Collection, 1988-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Living Groups collection, 1964-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Awards Reference collection, 1972-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Subject Files Reference Collection, 1859-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
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creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Fuqua School of Business Reference Collection, 1968-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
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creatorOf Allen Building Takeover Collection, 1969-2002 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Building Reference collection, 1972-2004. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. School of the Environment Reference Collection, 1991-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
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creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. School of Engineering Reference Collection, 1913-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Founders' Day Reference Collection, 1902-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Founders' Day Reference Collection, 1902-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Songs and Cheers Reference Collection, 1913-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Fraternities and Sororities collection, ., 1931-2001 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Commencement Exercises Reference Collection, 1850-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Dining Services Reference Collection, 1945-2001 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University Press Reference Collection, 1922-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Julian Abele reference collection, 1974-2009 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Blue Devil Reference collection, 1972-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Departments and Academic Divisions Reference Collection, 1904-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. The Duke Endowment Reference Collection, 1964-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Libraries Reference Collection, 1972-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Graduate School Reference Collection, 1958-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Academics and Research Reference Collection, 1851-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Firsts Reference Collection, 1906-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. American Dance Festival reference collection, 1977-2000. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Committees Reference Collection, 1932-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Association of Independent Houses collection, ., 1966-1983 University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Black History at Duke Reference Collection, 1948 - 2001 and undated University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Labor Unions Reference Collection, 1958-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf University Archives Poster Collection, 1935-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) Reference Collection, 1889-1992 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Bassett Affair collection, 1903-2003. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Convocations Reference Collection, 1937-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Arts at Duke Reference Collection, circa 1910-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Reference Collection, 1963-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Robert F. Durden Reference Collection, 1965-2000. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Directory of Academic Administration Reference Collection, 1958-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Sarah P. Duke Garden Reference Collection, 1934-[ongoing] University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Student Organizations Reference Collection., 1913-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. University Archives Poster Collection, 1935-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Chapel Reference Collection, 1933-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Mary Duke Biddle Foundation Reference Collection, 1970-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. University File Reference Collection, 1960-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University Anniversaries Collection, ., 1937 - 2000 University Archives, Duke University.
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creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duke University Medical Center Reference Collection, 1941-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Pictorial Works Reference Collection, circa 1895-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duke University Museum of Art reference collection, 1932-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Biographical Reference collection, 1972-2004. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duke University Archives Scrapbook Collection, 1916-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University Medical Center Reference Collection, 1941-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.) collection, 1836-1990. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duke University Wedgwood Plates Reference Collection, 1937-1938. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Libraries Reference collection, 1972-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Organization for Tropical Studies Reference Collection, 1979-1988 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Signs and Symbols Reference Collection, 1972-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Office of Intercultural Affairs Reference Collection, 2000-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University Wedgwood Plates Reference Collection, 1937-1938 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Residential Life Reference Collection, 1922-2001 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Environmentalism Reference Collection, 1970-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Richard M. Nixon Reference Collection, 1934-1999. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke Vigil Collection, ., 1968 - 1988 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Environmentalism Reference Collection, 1970-Ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Office of Human Resources Reference Collection, 1950-[ongoing] University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf School of Engineering Reference Collection, 1913-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Board of Trustees Reference collection, 1941-2002. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. University Archives Photograph Collection, 1861-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Associations Reference Collection, 1927-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Allen Building Takeover collection, 1969-2002. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Artifact and Relics Collection, 1830s-[on-going] Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Nixon Library Controversy collection, 1981-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Student Papers Reference Collection, 1890-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duplicates Collection, 1887-2002. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Building Reference Collection, ., 1972 - 2004 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Living Groups collection, ., 1964-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf President Richard H. Brodhead Reference Collection, 2004-Ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Student Life Reference Collection, 1963-ongoing Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. University Policies Reference Collection, 1933-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf American Dance Festival Reference Collection, ., 1977 - 2000 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Subject Files Reference Collection, 1859-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Navy V-12 Program Collection, 1943-1944. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. University Archives Postcard Collection, 1905-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Black History at Duke reference collection, 1948-2001 and undated. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Biographical Reference Collection, ., 1972 - 2004 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Jazz and Big Band Reference Collection, 1926-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. President Richard H. Brodhead Reference Collection, 2004-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf University Finance Reference Collection, 1948-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Office of Intercultural Affairs Reference Collection, 2000-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Residential Life Reference Collection, 1922-2001 Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Freshman Life Reference Collection, 1946-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Gross-Edens Affair Reference Collection, 1960, 1994. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Awards Reference Collection, 1879-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Admissions Reference Collection, 1949-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Student Organizations Reference Collection, 1913-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Alumni Affairs Reference Collection, 1950-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Reference Collection, 1963-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. School of Law Reference Collection, 1930-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Richard M. Nixon Reference Collection, 1934-1999 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Fraternities and Sororities collection, 1931-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duke Vigil collection, 1968-1988. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Bassett Affair Collection, ., 1903 - 2003 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Town and Gown Reference Collection, 1894-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Art and Artifacts records, 1915-2005. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Undergraduate Publications Board Reference Collection, 1893-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Sarah P. Duke Gardens Reference Collection, 1934-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Commencement Exercises Reference Collection, 1850-2011 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Founders' Society Reference Collection, 1980-1997. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Robert F. Durden Reference Collection, circa 1965-2001 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf School of Law Reference Collection, 1930-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Student Life Reference Collection, 1963-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Scholarships Reference Collection, 1953-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf University Policies Reference collection, 1933-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Board of Trustees Reference Collection, ., 1941 - 2002 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Departments and Academic Divisions Reference Collection, 1904-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Scholarships Reference Collection, 1953-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Artifacts and Relics Collection, 1830s-[ongoing] University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Christmas Cards Reference Collection, 1940s-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Auxiliary Services Reference Collection, 1986-2002. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Gross-Edens Affair Reference Collection, 1960, 1994 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Events Reference Collection, 1903-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Religious Life Reference Collection, 1937-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Campus Groups Reference Collection, 1892-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Duke Student Government Reference Collection, 1993-[ongoing]. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Athletics Reference Collection, 1888-2005. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University Archives Scrapbook collection, 1916-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Charles Jones Soong Reference Collection, 1882-1995. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University Archives Photographic Negative Collection, 1855-1995 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Dining Services Reference Collection, 1945-2001. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Faculty Reference Collection, 1972-2000 University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Signs and Symbols Reference collection, 1972-ongoing University Archives, Duke University.
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. University Finances Reference Collection, 1948-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Organization for Tropical Studies Reference Collection, 1979-1988. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Duke University. University Archives. Pictorial Works Reference Collection, circa 1895-ongoing. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Abdelnaby, Alaa person
associatedWith Abele, Julian F. person
associatedWith Abel, Trudi person
associatedWith Abrams, Ian Neal person
associatedWith Acomb, Frances History person
associatedWith Adams, Anne person
associatedWith Adams, Donald K. person
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