Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916

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Watkins was a pioneer California photographer, most well known for his large-format photographs.

From the description of Views of Thurlow Lodge by Carleton Watkins: photograph album, circa 1874. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122510599

An American landscape photographer, Carleton E. Watkins was noted for his views of the Pacific Northwest and Yosemite.

From the description of Carleton E. Watkins Collection. [1879]. (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC); University of Texas at Austin). WorldCat record id: 191957063

The removal of the original prints from the album bindings was done circa 1990; the original photographs are now housed in print boxes.

From the description of Carleton Watkins mammoth plate prints : photographs of the album bindings before disbinding for conservation purposes, circa 1990. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754866098

Carleton E. Watkins (November 11, 1829 - June 23, 1916) was a noted 19th century California photographer. His interest in photography started as an aide in a San Francisco portrait studio, and he started taking photographs of his own in 1861. He became interested in landscape photography and soon started making photographs of California mining scenes and of Yosemite Valley. He experimented with several new photographic techniques, and eventually favored his "Mammoth Camera," which used large glass plate negatives, and a stereographic camera. He became famous for his series of photographs and historic stereoviews of Yosemite Valley in the 1860s, and also created a variety of images of California and Oregon in the 1870s and later.

From the description of Carleton E. Watkins Pacific Coast steroeviews, circa 1870. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 375198516

Watkins was one of California's foremost photographers. He is best known for his photographs of Yosemite and his use of a large camera to produce large images. He also photographed along the entire West Coast of the United States.

From the description of Carleton E. Watkins stereographs, circa 1850s-1900s. (Brigham Young University). WorldCat record id: 123235294

Carleton E. Watkins (1829-1916) was a pioneering photographer of the American West. Born in Oneonta, New York, Watkins moved to San Jose, California at the height of the gold rush in 1851, where he worked as a daguerreotype photographer in a local photography studio. Around 1857, Watkins established his own photographic studio for portraits and landscape photography in San Francisco. Hes visited the Yosemite Valley in 1861, making mammoth plate and stereographic photographs of the area. His mammoth plates of Yosemite Valley were the first photographs of this size to be made in California, and among the first depictions of the American West available to people living in the eastern United States. In 1865, the California Geological Survey (CGS) hired Watkins to be their official photographer. While working for the CGS, Watkins became influenced by CGS Director Josiah Dwight Whitney's interest in the Northwest. He visited the Columbia River in 1868 and photographed the region extensively. In 1882, Watkins returned to the Northwest to create his "New Boudoir Series," which included Seattle, Port Blakely, Port Gamble, and Tacoma. On another trip to the Northwest in 1890, he made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B.C., Canada. He extended this trip into Montana where he made mammoth plate views of the Anaconda copper mines and other subjects. Watkins' last large commercial job was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield, California. In the late 1890s, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton, California, for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment. Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his glass plate negatives and photographs when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco, destroying his studio and nearly all of its contents. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County, but died at the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California.

From the description of Carleton E. Watkins photographs [graphic], circa 1882. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 404100600

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Gallery to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone, Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and "The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins", by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Yosemite Views Photographed by Carleton E. Watkins., (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego County, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotyper who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography. Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860s and 1870s.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins's New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins's fiftieth birthday). They had two children: a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone, Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions. On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890s, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins's wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins's entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(from: The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E.Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and The Life and Photography of Carleton E.Watkins, by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Carleton Watkins collection of photographs, ca. 1867-1882, (University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotyper who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography. Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise The Bancroft Library's Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone, Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and "The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins," by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Collection of Photographs by Carleton E. Watkins, (Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860s and 1870s.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment. Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and "The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins", by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Stereo Views of the West by Carleton E. Watkins, ca. 1865-ca. 1880, (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone, Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and " The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins ", by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the San Francisco Photographs Taken by Carleton E. Watkins, ca. 1872-ca. 1879, (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children: a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins, by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Logging Operations in Little River, California, (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Gallery to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone, Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and "The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins," by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Views of San Francisco, Yosemite, and Monterey: Photographed by C. E. Watkins., (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biographical Information

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the Grizzly Giant. In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. Watkins' New Series of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the End of the Track and as far as Tombstone Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield.He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Haciendanear Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was lead by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

From The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley; and The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins, by Peter E. Palmquist.

From the guide to the Mendocino Coast Photographed by Carleton E. Watkins, 1863, (The Bancroft Library.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and "The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins", by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Stereographic Views from the Eugene Compton Collection by Carleton E. Watkins, 1870-1885., (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the Grizzly Giant. In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860s and 1870s.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. Watkins' New Series of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the End of the Track and as far as Tombstone Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890s, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was lead by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

From The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley; and The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins, by Peter E. Palmquist.

From the guide to the Sun Sketches of San Mateo, 1875, (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Biography

Carleton E. Watkins was born in Oneonta, Oswego county, New York, on November 11, 1829. He was the youngest of five children of a Scottish innkeeper. During his youth he became acquainted with Collis P. Huntington, who frequented his father's hotel. Soon after the discovery of gold, both young men went to California, where Huntington later became one of the Big Four who built the Central Pacific Railroad.

In 1854, while working as a clerk in a store on Montgomery Street, Watkins met R. H. Vance, the daguerreotypist who had studios in San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. The employee at Vance's San Jose studio had suddenly quit and Vance asked Watkins if he would fill in until a permanent replacement could be found. Although he knew nothing of photographic processes, Watkins agreed. For the first few days he was simply the care-taker of the studio, but when Vance could not find a new operator, he instructed Watkins in coating the daguerreotype plates and making exposures. With only the briefest instructions, Watkins was able to make portraits and completely operated the gallery for a short period. In 1857 or 1858 Watkins returned to San Francisco where he established his own photographic studio for portraits and view photography.

Watkins usually spent a large portion of the summer traveling throughout California, leaving his gallery and studio in the hands of an assistant. In 1858 or 1859 he visited the Mariposa Grove and was the first person to photograph the "Grizzly Giant." In 1861, Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley and made the first 18" x 22" landscape photographs in California (and possibly the world). He made many more trips to Yosemite during the 1860's and 1870's.

In 1868 Watkins made his first trip to Oregon, where he made the first photographic reproductions of the Columbia River. Five years later, Watkins went to Utah with his wagon, team and photographic equipment on railroad cars. Thanks to his friend Collis P. Huntington, he traveled free. He was accompanied on this trip by close friend and artist William Keith, who made extensive use of Watkins' photographs for many of his oil paintings.

During the winter of 1871-72, Watkins expanded his San Francisco gallery (the Yosemite Gallery), which put an extra strain on his finances. When the Bank of California went under in 1874, Watkins lost his Yosemite Art Galley to competitors J.J. Cook and I.W. Taber. Not only did his competitors take over his Gallery, they took all of his negatives as well. Watkins then began the task of rebuilding his collection, which meant rephotographing many of the sites he had visited earlier in his career. "Watkins' New Series" of views replaced those lost in the foreclosure. Watkins did become reassociated with the Yosemite Gallery, first as a photographer, and later as manager, but never as the owner.

Watkins went to the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City, Nevada, in 1876. Here he made many of the photographs that comprise the Hearst Collection. It was probably during this trip that he met Frances Sneed, who later managed his Montgomery Street studio and became his wife on November 11, 1880 (Watkins' fiftieth birthday). They had two children : a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis.

In 1880, Watkins went to Southern California for the first time and traveled along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Later he went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tombstone, Arizona. The photographs taken by Watkins on this trip represent some of the earliest views of San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego. On the way back to San Francisco, he followed the old overland stage road, traveling the greater part of the way in his wagon and photographing most of the Franciscan missions. These pictures constitute the earliest photographic collection of California Missions.

On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B. C. He extended this trip into Montana where he made 18" x 22" views of the Anaconda copper mines and other properties. His last large commercial job and long country trip was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield. He made seven hundred views using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives. In the late 1890's, Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment.

Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his plates, photographs, etc. when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He had been living with his family in his studio on the top floor of a building on the southeast corner of Ninth and Market Streets. Immediately following the quake, Watkins' wife and daughter went to the refugee camp at the Presidio. Watkins was led by his son to the home of his old friend, C. B. Turrill, who had assisted Watkins financially in the past. Watkins' entire collection was destroyed in the fire which followed the quake. He was shocked by the loss of his life's work and shortly thereafter retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County. The ranch had been deeded to Watkins through the offices of Collis P. Huntington of the Southern Pacific Railroad for his faithful, but unpaid, service to the railroad.

Watkins never recovered from the shock of losing his entire collection in the San Francisco fire. He managed to live at the ranch with his family until it became necessary to have him committed to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California in 1910. He died on June 23, 1916 at the age of eighty-seven and was buried on the hospital grounds.

(From : The Early Pacific Coast Photographs of Carleton E. Watkins, by J. W. Johnson, Professor of Hydraulic Engineering, University of California Berkeley, and The Life and Photography of Carleton E. Watkins, by Peter E. Palmquist.)

From the guide to the Scenic California, (The Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley.)

Carleton E. Watkins, renowned nineteenth-century photographer of the American West, began his career in photography in 1854 at the age of 25. Born in Oneonta, N. Y. in 1829, Watkins relocated to California in the spring of 1851 and by 1853-1854 was living in San Francisco. There he was taught the art of photography by Robert Vance (1825-1876), owner of daguerreotype studios in San Francisco and San Jose. By 1856, Watkins had moved on to work as an ambrotypist in the portrait studio of James M. Ford (1827-circa 1877) in San Jose.

Sometime between 1856 and 1858, Watkins began operating as a freelance photographer in the San Jose and San Francisco areas and experimented with large-format outdoor photography using wet-plate collodion negatives. His largest surviving body of work prior to 1861 documents Las Mariposas, the California mining estate of Col. John C. Frémont. In 1861, Watkins traveled to Yosemite with a mammoth-plate camera. The thirty mammoth plates and one hundred stereoscopic negatives that he made during this trip were partly responsible for government protection of Yosemite as a national park and were published in Josiah Whitney’s The Yosemite Book in 1869, one of the first American books devoted solely to landscape photography. Watkins returned to Yosemite many times between 1861 and 1881 to photograph the park and even set up his own gallery there to showcase and sell his photography.

In 1865, Watkins opened his "Yo Semite Gallery" at 425 Montgomery Street in San Francisco. That same year, he won an award for "Mountain Views" at the San Francisco Mechanics' Institute Industrial Exhibition and, in 1867, won a bronze medal for his mammoth plates of Yosemite at the Paris International Exposition, earning him an international reputation as a landscape photographer. In July of that same year, Watkins traveled to Oregon to photograph Portland, Or. and the Columbia River area. Beginning in Portland, Watkins traveled south to Oswego and Oregon City on the Willamette River to photograph the area and north again across the Columbia to Vancouver in the Washington Territory. He then traveled east along the Columbia River, following the trade route of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company, finally leaving Oregon in November of 1867 with fifty-nine mammoth plates and one hundred stereograph negatives. Fifty of these mammoth views were exhibited in Portland in 1868 at Shanahan’s Art Gallery, garnering Watkins much acclaim. He also won the top award that year for a major exhibit of Pacific Coast photography at the San Francisco Mechanics’ Institute Industrial Exhibition.

In 1875, financial troubles and a nationwide economic slump caused Watkins to lose his studio in San Francisco, his gallery in Yosemite, and the entire collection of what is now known as his “Old Series” negatives. His business was sold to Isaiah W. Taber, who continued to print these negatives under his own studio imprint. However, by 1876, Watkins was up and running again, determined to re-photograph many of his famous views for what he called his “New Series of Pacific Coast Views.” As part of this series, Watkins made a return trip to Oregon in 1882, stopping at Portland and the Columbia River before continuing north to photograph the Puget Sound area of the Washington Territory and Victoria, British Columbia. He returned to Oregon again in 1883 to photograph Cascade Locks on the Columbia River, as well as other features of the river valley, and again during the winter of 1884-1885, when he photographed a winter blizzard that snowed in an Oregon Railway and Navigation Railroad train on its tracks in the Columbia River Gorge.

Carleton Watkins continued to photograph until the early 1890s, when his health began to fail. For the rest of his life, he lived in near blindness and poverty. All of his negatives were destroyed in the April 1906 earthquake and fire in San Francisco. For the next decade, Watkins lived under the custody of his daughter and the Napa State Hospital for the Insane and died on June 23, 1916. His photographs remain some of the earliest and most well-regarded visual records of the landscape of the American West and its early settlement.

From the guide to the Carleton E. Watkins photographs, 1861-1885, (Oregon Historical Society)

Carleton E. Watkins was born November 11, 1829 in Oneonta, New York. He moved to San Jose, California in 1851 at the height of the gold rush and worked as a daguerreotype photographer in a local photography studio. Around 1857, Watkins established his own photographic studio for portraits and landscape photography in San Francisco.

Watkins visited the Yosemite Valley in 1861, making 30 mammoth plate (18" x 22") and 100 stereographic photographs of the area. His mammoth plates of Yosemite Valley were the first photographs of this size to be made in California, and among the first depictions of the American West available to people living in the eastern United States. Due in part to Watkins' photographs, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill in 1864 that declared the Yosemite valley "inviolable," and that paved the way for the National Parks system.

In 1865 the California Geological Survey (CGS) hired Watkins as their official photographer. While working for the CGS, Watkins became influenced by CGS Director Josiah Dwight Whitney’s interest in the Northwest. Watkins visited the Columbia River in 1868 and photographed the region extensively.

Financial problems caused Watkins to lose his Yosemite Art Galley in 1874, and subsequently to lose the rights to all of his prints and negatives to competitors J.J. Cook and Isaiah W. Taber. He later rebuilt his collection by revisiting and photographing the sites he had originally photographed. During his travels to rebuild his collection, Watkins met Frances Sneed and the two married on November 11, 1880. They had two children, a daughter, Julia and a son, Collis. Frances later managed Watkins' Montgomery Street studio in San Francisco.

In 1882, Watkins returned to the Northwest to create his "New Boudoir Series," which included Seattle, Port Blakely, Port Gamble, and Tacoma. On a second trip to the Northwest in 1890, Watkins made a series of stereoscopic views in Victoria, B.C., Canada. He extended this trip into Montana where he made mammoth plate views of the Anaconda copper mines and other subjects. Watkins' last large commercial job was to photograph the development work of the Kern County Land Company near Bakersfield, California. There, he made seven hundred photographs using 8" x 10" dry plate negatives.

In the late 1890s Watkins began to photograph the Hearst Hacienda near Pleasanton, California, for Phoebe Apperson Hearst, but ill health prevented him from completing the assignment. Watkins was in the process of negotiating with Stanford University for the sale of his glass plate negatives and photographs when the 1906 earthquake struck San Francisco and destroyed his studio and nearly all of its contents. By this time, Watkins was partially blind, in poor health and experiencing financial difficulties. He retired to his small ranch near Capay in Yolo County, which had been deeded to Watkins for unpaid services to the Southern Pacific Railroad. In 1910 Watkins' failing health led his family to commit him to the Napa State Hospital at Imola, California. He died on June 23, 1916 and was buried on the hospital grounds.

From the guide to the Carleton E. Watkins Photographs, circa 1882, (University of Washington Libraries Special Collections)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Thomas Starr King giving a pro-Union speech in San Francisco, shortly after beginning of Civil War : photograph, 1861. Stanford University. Department of Special Collections and University Archives
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton Emmons Watkins letters, 1880-1890. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Stereograph File, [1855-1964] © 2011 New-York Historical Society
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. San Francisco, Mammoth Tree Grove, and Yosemite views [graphic] / taken by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. Miscellaneous materials on the history of photography, 1863-1963. Water Resources Collections and Archives, WRCA
creatorOf Mammoth plate views in California and Oregon, circa 1863-circa 1880? Bancroft Library
creatorOf Carleton Watkins collection of photographs, ca. 1867-1882 University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.
referencedIn Carroll T. Hobart papers, 1871-1904 Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Stereographic Views from the Eugene Compton Collection by Carleton E. Watkins, 1870-1885. Bancroft Library
referencedIn Ralph H. Anderson Papers, 1934-1978 Museum of New Mexico. Fray Angélico Chávez History Library.
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographs of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company [graphic]. California Historical Society
creatorOf Yosemite views from the Sierra Club collection, circa 1861-1866, 1861 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Sun Sketches of San Mateo, 1875 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Johnson, C. W. J. (Charles Wallace Jacob), 1833-1903. Historic photographs of California and the Southwest from the Francis P. Farquhar collection [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. [Views of the Lake Tahoe area, sequoia groves, and San Francisco] [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Historical Society of Southern California Collection of Photographs by Subject, circa 1850-1982, (bulk 1880s-1930s) The Huntington Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton E. Watkins Pacific Coast steroeviews, circa 1870. University of Washington Libraries
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. C.E. Watkins : pioneer Pacific Coast photographer / J.W. Johnson : typescript (carbon), [undated]. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Frederick Wallace Wilson papers, 1852-1938 Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries
creatorOf Arizona photographs, [1880] Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographic views of the Golden Gate Mining Claim [and the Golden Feather Mining Claim] situated on Feather River, Butte County, Cal. [graphic] / by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton E. Watkins Collection. Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn J. W. Johnson Papers, 1863-2000 (bulk 1933-1988) Water Resources Collections and Archives
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. Correspondence on C.E. Watkins, 1952-1986, 1955-1959. Water Resources Collections and Archives, WRCA
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. San Francisco photographs [graphic] / taken by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Selected mammoth plate photographic prints from the Keith McHenry Pond collection, [1859-circa 1880] Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton Watkins Anaconda portfolio, 1890. University of Idaho Library
creatorOf Miscellaneous mammoth plate photographs by Carleton E. Watkins, 1859-circa 1890 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Photographic portraits of prominent Californians and vistors to San Francisco, circa 1871-1876 California Historical Society
creatorOf Gomez de la Cortina Family Stereograph Collection Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Mammoth plate landscape photographs from the George Davidson collection [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographs of California scenes [graphic] : Yosemite, the Sierra Nevada, and the Hotel del Monte. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Barkle, Thomas J., 1878-1956,. Barkle collection 1874-1908. Monterey Public Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Portraits of Ira G. and Julie B. Hoitt [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn The Chinese in California, 1850-1925 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Dupont St. from near California - view north [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Colby, William Edward, 1875-1964. Interviews relating to Yosemite National Park, ca. 1948-1976 : oral history transcripts / tape recorded interviews conducted under the auspices of the National Park Service and the Regional Oral History Office, the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, California, 1946-1976. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Carleton E. Watkins Photographs, circa 1882 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Views of Thurlow Lodge by Carleton Watkins: photograph album, circa 1874. Stanford University. Department of Special Collections and University Archives
creatorOf Photographic views of the Golden Gate Mining Claim [and the Golden Feather Mining Claim] situated on Feather River, Butte County, Cal., 1891 Bancroft Library
creatorOf San Francisco Photographs Taken by Carleton E. Watkins, ca. 1872-ca. 1879 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographs of Weber Canon and Echo City, Utah [graphic]. Southern Methodist University, DeGolyer Library
creatorOf Collection of Photographs by Carleton E. Watkins Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology. University of California, Berkeley.
referencedIn History of photography collection, 1840-1986 (inclusive). Harvard University Art Museum
referencedIn Watkins, Carleton, 1829- : [miscellaneous ephemeral material]. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Mendocino Coast [picture] / photographed by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Blanchard, James B.,. Historical Society of Southern California Collection of Lantern Slides [graphic], 1870s-1932. Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens
creatorOf Chase, D. B. (Dana B.). U.S. western and military photographs collection [picture]. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Artist file. Brooklyn Museum Libraries & Archives
creatorOf Mendocino Coast Photographed by Carleton E. Watkins, 1863 Bancroft Library
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. Description of C.E. Watkins' pictures of the Mendocino coast, 1956 May 25. Water Resources Collections and Archives, WRCA
creatorOf Mammoth plate photographs of Yosemite Valley, between 1861 and 1881 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Hobart, Carroll T. Carroll T. Hobart papers, 1871-1904. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Rolfe, Frank, b. 1874. Historical Society of Southern California Collection - Frank Rolfe Collection of Photographs and Negatives [graphic], 1899-1959, (bulk 1905-1907, 1925-1932)? Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens
referencedIn Thomas Weston Fels (AC 1967) Papers, 1972-2008, 1983-2004 Amherst College Archives and Special Collections
creatorOf Smith, J. G. (James Girard). Some views around Vallejo and Mare Island [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Baker, Viroque. Historical Society of Southern California Collection of Photographs by Subject [graphic], ca. 1850s-1982 (bulk 1880s-1930s). Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. California stereo views [graphic] : including Geysers in Sonoma County. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Historical Society of Southern California Collection of Lantern Slides, 1870s-1932 The Huntington Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Drying squid at the Chinese fishery [graphic] : Monterey / [photographed by Carleton E. Watkins]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. [The Grand Central Hotel, Oakland, Calif.] [graphic] / photographed by C.E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. San Francisco stereographs [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Ellis, Arthur M. (Arthur McDonald), 1875-1932,. Arthur M. Ellis Photographic Negative Collection [graphic], 1849-1923, (bulk 1880s-1890s) Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens
creatorOf WATKINS, CARLETON E. Artist file : miscellaneous uncataloged material. Museum of Modern Art (MOMA)
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton. Watkins, Carleton : [photography bio file]. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library
creatorOf Photograph of the Indian Block House, Upper Cascades, Oregon, undated Oregon Historical Society Research Library
creatorOf Photographs of Yosemite: with additional views of Mt. Shasta, Calif. and Cape Horn, Columbia River, Oregon, circa 1861-1885 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Pond, C. L. (Charles L.), 1832-1891. Sierra Nevada and Utah stereograph views [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton E. Watkins photograph collection [graphic] Denver Public Library, Central Library
creatorOf Yosemite Views Photographed by Carleton E. Watkins. Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton Watkins mammoth plate prints : photographs of the album bindings before disbinding for conservation purposes, circa 1990. Stanford University. Department of Special Collections and University Archives
creatorOf Camp, Charles Lewis, 1893-1975. Charles L. Camp collection of stereographs [picture]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916,. Carleton E. Watkins photographs [graphic], 1861-1885. Oregon Historical Society Research Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton Watkins mammoth plate photographs : original album bindings (prints have been removed for preservation purposes), undated. Stanford University. Department of Special Collections and University Archives
referencedIn Arthur M. Ellis Collection of Photographic Negatives, 1849-1923, bulk 1880s-1890s The Huntington Library
creatorOf Morse, G. D. (George Daniels), fl. ca. 1860-ca. 1900. Berkeley Club member portraits [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Photographs of Yosemite, San Francisco, Oregon, Peru, and other locations [graphic], ca. 1867-1868 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Arizona photographs [graphic] / by Carleton E. Watkins. University of California, Bancroft Library, ARL
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographic portraits of prominent Californians and visitors to San Francisco, Calif., 1871-1876 [graphic]. California Historical Society
referencedIn Letters from Robert in San Francisco, Calif. : to Lucy, 1862-1863. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn J. W. Johnson Papers, 1863-2000 (bulk 1933-1988) Water Resources Collections and Archives
referencedIn California Cornerstones: Selected Images from The Bancroft Library Pictorial Collection Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographs of Carmel and the Monterey area (Calif.), c. 1882-1892 and nd. Stanford University. Department of Special Collections and University Archives
creatorOf Thomas, John Lewis, 1835-1893. John Lewis Thomas papers relating to the Northern Pacific Railroad, 1878-1884. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographs of Yosemite, San Francisco, Oregon, Peru, and other locations [graphic] / taken by Eadweard Muybridge and Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Pitman, Richard N. California photographs from the Richard M. Pitman collection [graphic]. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Early American West Photograph Collection, circa 1861-1900 © 2011 New-York Historical Society
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916,. Warner and Pope families photographs collection [graphic], circa 1880-1920. Oregon Historical Society Research Library
creatorOf Scenic California Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Stereographs of Yosemite Valley and Hutchings' Hotel [graphic] / by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. [Group portrait of eleven unidentified men] [graphic] / Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Anderson, Ralph H. Ralph H. Anderson papers, 1934-1978. Museum of New Mexico Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916,. Carleton E. Watkins stereographs, circa 1850s-1900s. Brigham Young University, Harold B. Lee Library
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. J.W. Johnson papers, 1962-1966. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Light-house at Farallone Islands, Pacific Ocean copy negative of stereograph, circa 1861-1873. San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, Maritime Research Center, Maritime Library, Maritime Archives
referencedIn U.S. Western and Military Photograph Collection, 1860-1910 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn Petit, Pierre, 1832-. Exposition universelle, 1867 Paris. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Geological Survey (U.S.). 19th century western stereo-views collection, 1865-1899 (bulk 1865-1885) Utah State University, Merrill-Cazier Library
creatorOf Phelan, James D. (James Duval), 1861-1930. San Francisco, 1846 to 1890 [graphic] : [a collection of mounted photographs]. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton E. Watkins photographs [graphic], circa 1882. University of Washington Libraries
referencedIn 19th Century Western Stereo-views Collection, 1865-1899 Utah State University. Special Collections and ArchivesPhotograph Collection
creatorOf Logging Operations in Little River, California Bancroft Library
creatorOf Haynes, Willis Pearson, 1857-1911. Haynes photograph collection, 1878-1900 (bulk 1885-1890). Arizona Historical Society, Southern Arizona Division
referencedIn Compton, Eugene. Notes regarding Carlton E. Watkins and his family. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Stereo Views of the West by Carleton E. Watkins, ca. 1865-ca. 1880 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Cathedral Stump House through the Sentinels [graphic] : Calaveras Grove. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. English Reservoir, Nevada County, California (constructed 1856-58), 1972 June / J.W. Johnson. Water Resources Collections and Archives, WRCA
creatorOf Beaman, E. O.,. Stereoview collection, ca. 1860-1920 (bulk 1880-1900). Arizona Historical Society, Southern Arizona Division
creatorOf Thomas, John Lewis, 1835-1893. John Lewis Thomas papers relating to the Northern Pacific Railroad, 1878-1884. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. Julia Watkins interview, [1956?]-2000. Water Resources Collections and Archives, WRCA
referencedIn M.H. De Young Memorial Museum. M.H. De Young Memorial Museum records, 1894-1971. Smithsonian Archives of American Art
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Mammoth plate views in California and Oregon [graphic] / by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographs of California scenes [graphic] : a mammoth plate miscellany / by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916,. Photograph of the Indian Block House, Upper Cascades, Oregon [graphic], undated. Oregon Historical Society Research Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton Emmons, 1829-1916. Yosemite : a collection of views. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Haskett Family Photograph Collection, 1897-1943 Claremont Colleges. Honnold/Mudd Library.
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton E. Watkins papers, circa 1864-1890, undated. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E. Stereographs, 1850-1900. American Primers
creatorOf Mammoth plate landscape photographs from the George Davidson collection, 1860-1879? Bancroft Library
referencedIn Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908-. Notes on C.E. Watkins, 1867-1999. Water Resources Collections and Archives, WRCA
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Carleton E. Watkins papers, circa 1864-1890, undated. UC Berkeley Libraries
creatorOf Taber, I. W. (Isaiah West), 1830-1912. Photographs of Yosemite [graphic] : with additional views of Mt. Shasta, Calif. and Cape Horn, Columbia River, Oregon. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Photographs of California scenes: a mammoth plate miscellany, [between 1861 and 1885?] Bancroft Library
referencedIn Historical Society of Southern California Collection – Frank Rolfe Collection of Negatives and Photographs, 1899-1959, (bulk 1905-1907, 1925-1932) The Huntington Library
creatorOf Views of San Francisco, Yosemite, and Monterey: Photographed by C. E. Watkins. Bancroft Library
creatorOf Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916. Photographic panorama of San Francisco and a view of the city from the bay [graphic] / by Carleton E. Watkins. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Robert Aubrey Miller papers, 1856-1932 Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries
creatorOf Carleton E. Watkins photographs, 1861-1885 Oregon Historical Society Research Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Direct Relationships
Relation Name
associatedWith Agassiz, Louis, 1807-1873 person
associatedWith Anderson, Ralph H. person
associatedWith Barkle, Thomas J., 1878-1956, person
associatedWith Bartling, William & Kimball, Henry, corporateBody
associatedWith Bartling, William & Kimball, Henry, corporateBody
associatedWith Beekman, Cornelius C., 1828-1915 person
associatedWith Bierstadt, Albert, 1830-1902 person
associatedWith Bloomer, Hiram Reynolds, 1845-1911 person
associatedWith Brookes, Samuel Marsden, 1816-1892 person
associatedWith California Heritage Project. corporateBody
associatedWith California Heritage Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Camp, Charles Lewis, 1893-1975. person
associatedWith Catholic church corporateBody
associatedWith Compton, Eugene. person
associatedWith Davidson, George person
associatedWith Davidson, George, 1825-1911 person
associatedWith Davis, Daniel M. 1971- person
associatedWith Eadweard Muybridge person
associatedWith Ellis, Arthur M. (Arthur McDonald), 1875-1932, person
associatedWith Eugene Compton person
associatedWith Farquhar, Francis Peloubet person
associatedWith Farquharson, David. person
associatedWith Fels, Thomas Weston person
associatedWith Ford, Jerome B. (Jerome Birsley), 1821-1889. person
associatedWith Gardiner, James T. (James Terry) person
associatedWith Golden Feather Mining Claim corporateBody
associatedWith Golden Gate Mining Claim corporateBody
associatedWith Gomez de la Cortina family family
associatedWith Grand Central Hotel (Oakland, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Hallidie, Andrew Smith, 1836-1900 person
associatedWith Haskett Family family
associatedWith Haynes, Willis Pearson, 1857-1911. person
associatedWith Hobart, Carroll T. person
associatedWith Hobart, Carroll T. person
associatedWith Hotel Del Monte (Monterey, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Houseworth, Thomas person
associatedWith Hutchings, J. M. (James Mason), 1820-1902 person
associatedWith Iwakura, Tomomi, 1825-1883 person
associatedWith I. W. Taber person
associatedWith Jackson, William Henry person
associatedWith Japan (Ship) corporateBody
associatedWith J. J. Reilly person
associatedWith Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), 1908- person
associatedWith Johnson, J. W. (Joe William), b. 1908 person
associatedWith Keith, William person
associatedWith King, Clarence person
associatedWith King, Thomas Starr, 1824-1864. person
associatedWith Latham, Milton S. (Milton Slocum), 1827-1882. person
associatedWith Latham, Mollie, person
associatedWith McLaughlin, Frank, 1840?-1907. person
associatedWith M.H. De Young Memorial Museum. corporateBody
associatedWith Miller, Robert A. (Robert Aubrey), 1854-1941 person
associatedWith Mills, Darius O. (Darius Ogden) person
associatedWith Mills, Darius O. (Darius Ogden), 1825-1910 person
associatedWith Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Mission San Xavier del Bac (Tucson, Ariz.) corporateBody
associatedWith Muybridge, Eadweard person
associatedWith O'Brien, William Shoney, 1825 or 6-1878 person
associatedWith O'Brien, William Shoney, 1825 or 6-1878 person
associatedWith Online Archive of California. corporateBody
associatedWith Online Archive of California Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Pacific Mail Steamship Comany corporateBody
associatedWith Pacific Mail Steamship Company corporateBody
associatedWith Palace Hotel (San Francisco, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Pitman, Richard N. person
associatedWith Ralston, William Chapman, 1826-1875 person
associatedWith Reed, Simeon Gannett, 1830-1895 person
associatedWith Rolfe, Frank, b. 1874. person
associatedWith Sanborn, Warren G. person
associatedWith San Francisco de Asís Mission (San Francisco, Calif.) corporateBody
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associatedWith Senator (Ship) corporateBody
associatedWith Sierra Club corporateBody
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associatedWith Southern Pacific Railroad Company corporateBody
associatedWith Stebbins, Horatio, 1821-1902 person
associatedWith Taber, C. A. M. (Charles Austin Mendell), 1824-1911. person
associatedWith Taber, I. W. (Isaiah West) person
associatedWith Taber, I. W. (Isaiah West) person
associatedWith Taber, I. W. (Isaiah West), 1830-1912. person
associatedWith Thomas, John Lewis, 1835-1893. person
associatedWith Union Pacific Railroad Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Walker, James, 1819-1889 person
associatedWith Watkins, Carleton Emmons, Mrs., person
associatedWith Watkins, Collis, person
associatedWith Watkins, Julia, person
associatedWith Wayfarer (Ship) corporateBody
associatedWith Wilson, Frederick Wallace, 1872-1955 person
Place Name Admin Code Country
California--San Francisco
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Oregon
Mendocino County (Calif.)
California
Montana
Victoria (B. C.)
Calaveras Big Trees State Park (Calif.)
Columbia River
San Francisco (Calif.)
Shasta, Mount (Calif. : Mountain)
San Francisco (Calif.)
Alcatraz Island (Calif.)
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Victoria (B.C.)
California
Utah
Columbia River Gorge (Or. and Wash)
California--San Francisco
California
West (U.S.)
California--Butte County
California
Puget Sound (Wash.)
Calaveras Big Trees State Park (Calif.)
Port Madison (Bainbridge Island, Wash.)
Arizona--Tucson
Tahoe, Lake (Calif. and Nev.)
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Sierra Nevada (Calif. and Nev.)
Mammoth Tree Grove (Calif.)
Shasta, Mount (Calif.)
California--Mendocino County
United States
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Chinatown (San Francisco, Calif.)
California
Calaveras Big Trees State Park (Calif.)
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Columbia River Gorge (Or. and Wash.)
Pacific Coast (Calif.)
Port Gamble (Wash.)
Oregon
Utah--Summit County
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Farallon Islands (Calif.)
Upper Cascades (Or.)
Port Blakely (Wash.)
California
San Francisco (Calif.)
Arizona
United States
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
California--Monterey Bay Region
Chinatown (San Francisco, Calif.)
California--Monterey
Port Gamble (Wash.)
Calaveras Big Trees State Park (Calif.)
Shasta, Mount (Calif. : Mountain)
Nevada
Tuolumne Grove (Calif.)
Utah
San Francisco (Calif.)
California
California, Northern
Witch Rocks (Utah)
California
Portland (Or.)
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Monterey County (Calif.)
Market Street (San Francisco, Calif.)
Columbia River
Monterey (Calif.)
Port Blakely (Wash.)
Victoria (B.C.)
California
Portland (Or.)
California
Rincon Hill (San Francisco, Calif.)
Puget Sound (Wash.)
United States
Seattle (Wash.)
California
Menlo Park (Calif.)
California--Yosemite National Park
Seattle (Wash.)
San Francisco (Calif.)
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Farallon Islands (Calif.)
Tahoe, Lake, Region (Calif. and Nev.)
California
Upper Cascades (Or.)
Farallon Islands (Calif.)
California--Oakland
Yosemite National Park
Thurlow Lodge (Menlo Park, Calif.)
Mendocino County (Calif.)
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Utah
Port Madison (Bainbridge Island, Wash.)
Arizona
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Washington (State)
San Francisco (Calif.)
California
Farallon Islands (Calif.)
San Francisco (Calif.)
San Francisco (Calif.)
Montana--Butte
California--Farallon Islands
Victoria (B.C.)
Subject
Fine bindings--History--19th century
California
Chinese--Photographs
Lakes & ponds
Waterfalls
Docks--Photographs
Lumber trade--Washington (State)--Photographs
Shipbuilding--Washington (State)--Photographs
Photographers--Photographs
Mines and mineral resources--Photographs
Photography, Artistic
Shipyards--Washington (State)--Photographs
Giant sequoia--Photographs
Stevedores--Photographs
Landscape photography--History--19th century
Piers--Photographs
Deserts--Photographs
mountains,
Wharves--Washington (State)--Photographs
Artists--Pictorial works
Railroads--Utah--Photographs
Photographers--Correspondence, reminiscences, etc
Cactus--Photographs
Landscape--Photographs
Lumber trade--Photographs
Spanish mission buildings--Photographs
Waterfronts--Photographs
Gold mines and mining--Photographs
Wharves--Photographs
Railroad tracks--Washington (State)--Photographs
Sawmills--Photographs
Railroads--Photographs
Shipbuilding--Photographs
Mills and mill-work--Photographs
Ships--Photographs
Advertising--Photographers--Photographs
Railroad bridges
Hotels--Photographs
Wilderness areas--Photographs
Washington (State)
Miners--Photographs
Railroads--Track--Photographs
Oregon
Streams
British Columbia
Photographs
Steamships--Photographs
Piers--Washington (State)--Photographs
Ships and shipping
Railroads--Tracks
Railroads
Lighthouses--Photographs
Shipyards--Photographs
Lighthouse keepers--Photographs
Anaconda Company--Photographs
Mines and Mineral Resources
Photographers
Sawmills--Washington (State)--Photographs
Squid industry--Photographs
Occupation
Photographers
Photoprints
Function

Person

Birth 1829-11-11

Death 1916-06-23

Americans

English

Information

Permalink: http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w65h7khz

Ark ID: w65h7khz

SNAC ID: 45796430