Gerrit Smith Papers 1762-1962

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Gerrit Smith Papers, 1762-1962

Gerrit Smith Papers 1762-1962

Papers of the social reformer and philanthropist from Peterboro, New York. Business, family and general correspondence; business and land records; writings; and maps. Notable correspondents include Susan B. Anthony, John Jacob Astor, Henry Ward Beecher, Antoinette Blackwell, Caleb Calkins, Lydia Maria Child, Cassius Clay, Alfred Conkling, Roscoe Conkling, Charles A. Dana, Paulina W. Davis, Edward C. Delavan, Frederick Douglass, Albert G. Finney, Sarah Grimke, Elizabeth Cady and Henry B. Stanton, Louis Tappan, Sojourner Truth, and Theodore Weld.

130.0 linear ft.

eng,

Related Constellations

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Woodhull, Victoria C. (Victoria Claflin), 1838-1927

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Victoria C. Woodhull was a woman's rights pioneer who achieved notoriety on many fronts in Gilded Age America. She founded (with her sister Tennessee Claflin) a Wall Street brokerage, with the support and advice of Cornelius Vanderbilt. Woodhull used profits to publish Woodhull & Claflin Weekly, advocating female suffrage, free love, and other progressive causes. Later she addressed House committee on suffrage, and exposed the Beecher-Tilton scandal, implicating celebrated minister Henry War...

Blackwell, Antoinette Louisa Brown, 1825-1921

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Antoinette Louisa Brown Blackwell (1825-1921) was a reformer, abolitionist, author, lecturer, and the first woman ordained as a minister in the United States. In 1846, Blackwell enrolled at Oberlin College in Ohio, and by 1847, she had received her literary degree – the only degree available to women at the time. She stayed at Oberlin for three more years to study theology, but the college would not confer her degree or allow her to be ordained as a minister. She then began working as an indepen...

Green, Beriah, 1795-1874

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p84gqh (person)

Abolitionist clergyman; originally of New England; attended Middlebury College and Andover Seminary; teacher of biblical studies; taught at Western Reserve College, Hudson, Ohio, from 1830-1833; in 1832-1833 accepted an offer to head the Oneida Institute in Whitesboro, N.Y. (later known as Whitestown Seminary), where capitalized on the abolitionist feelings at Oneida and worked to organize anti-slavery societies in other parts of New York; Oneida closed due to financial difficulties in 1844 but ...

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

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Martin Van Buren (b. Kinderhook, New York, December 5, 1782-d. July 24, 1862, Kinderhook, New York), studied law, was admitted to bar, New York, 1803; moved to Huson surrogate of Columbia Co.; member of State Senate, 1813-1820; attorney general of New York, 1815-1819; delegate to state constitutional convention, 1821; U.S. Senate Democrat, March 4, 1821-1828; Governor of New York, 1828-1829; U.s. Secretary of State, March 12, 1829 - August 1, 1831; Vice President, 1832; President, 1836-1840....

May, Samuel J. (Samuel Joseph), 1797-1871

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Samuel May was a Unitarian clergyman of Syracuse, New York with connections to national organizations related to anti-Slavery, temperance, and suffrage, among others. From the description of Samuel J. May diary, 1867. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64691611 Samuel May was a Unitarian Clergyman of Syracuse, New York with connections to national organizations related to Freedman's Relief, Temperance, and Suffrage, among others. From the descripti...

Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895

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Frederick Douglass, a former slave, was a noted lecturer, writer, abolitionist, and diplomat. From the description of Frederick Douglass letter to George W. Curtis, 1872 September 20. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 50068315 Abolitionist, orator, journalist. From the description of Note, 1866 April 9. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 29647750 From the description of Letter: Washington, D.C., to [P...

Stone, Lucy, 1818-1893

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Lucy Stone (b. Aug. 13, 1818, West Brookfield, MA–d. Oct. 18, 1893, Boston, MA) was born to parents Hannah Matthews and Francis Stone. At age 16, Stone began teaching in district schools always earning far less money than men. In 1847, she became the first woman in Massachusetts to earn a college degree from Oberlin College. After college, Stone began her career with the Garrisonian Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society and began giving public speeches on women's rights. in the fall of 1847; With...

Helper, Hinton Rowan, 1829-1909

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American writer and diplomat. From the description of Autograph letter signed : New York, to A.H. Rathbone, 1893 Aug. 23. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270470872 Author and diplomat. From the description of Letters of Hinton Rowan Helper, 1860-1901. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79450859 Hinton Rowan Helper, born December 27, 1829 in Davie County, North Carolina, was a Southern critic of slavery whose books inflamed the South. His objection to the syst...

Dana, Charles A. (Charles Anderson), 1819-1897

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Tilton, Théodore 1835-1907

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Theodore Tilton (1835-1907) was an American newspaper editor, journalist, poet, and supporter of women's suffrage. He and his wife were parishioners of the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher and Tilton worked as his assistant for eleven years, until 1874, when Tilton sued Beecher for adultery with Mrs. Tilton. The case received widespread public attention. Tilton subsequently moved to Paris where he lived for the rest of his life. From the guide to the Theodore Tilton Correspondence, 1865-1894,...

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Garnet, Henry Highland, 1815-1882

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Henry Highland Garnet was a prominent African-American clergyman and abolitionist. Theodore Tilton was a poet, abolitionist, and editor of the Congregationalist newspaper the Independent. From the description of Henry Highland Garnet letter to Theodore Tilton, 1859. (New-York Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 709966851 ...

Finney, Charles G., 1792-1875

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Charles Grandison Finney (1792-1875), revivalist, educator, and second President of Oberlin College (1851-65), abandoned the practice of law after a dramatic religious conversion and, following ordination in the Presbyterian Church, launched a decade of extraordinarily successful revivals in New York state (1824-33). He left the Presbyterian Church in 1836 and identified himself as a Congregationalist from then on. Finney's brand of theological perfectionism helped to make Oberlin College famous...

Grimké, Angelina Emily 1805-1879

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Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820-1906

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Susan B. Anthony (b. February 15, 1820, Adams, Massachusetts-d. March 13, 1906, Rochester, New York)1820-1906), educated in New York and at the Philadelphia Friends Seminary. Anthony taught at various New York schools between 1839 and 1849. She became involved in women's suffrage, temperance, abolitionism, and labor reform after a meeting with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1850. Between 1868 and 1870 Anthony edited the "Revolution" a women's suffrage weekly. Best known for her lifelong crusade fo...

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Pillsbury, Parker, 1809-1898

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John Jacob Astor organized the American Fur Company in 1808, and the Pacific Fur Company in 1810. In the spring of 1811 he established a post at Astoria on the Columbia River, but sold it to British interests in 1813. By 1817 Astor had gained control of all the Mississippi Valley posts of the Northwest and Southwest Companies. The Columbia Fur Company, one of Astor's major competitors, was absorbed in 1827. By 1834 Astor tired of the fur business and sold all of his interests. From t...

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Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892

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John Greenleaf Whittier was a wildly popular New England poet. A deeply committed and active abolitionist, he wrote many of his poems with a political agenda, although distinguished by an open-minded tolerance so often lacking in his fellow abolitionists. Although his works are somewhat marred by overtly political and overly sentimental works, the core of his output stands as fine, lyrical American verse. From the description of John Greenleaf Whittier letters, 1858 and 1876. (Pennsy...

Foster, Abby Kelley, 1811-1887

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With husband, Stephen S. Foster, active in antislavery movement during the 1830s; married 1845, one daughter, Alla, b. 1847; residents of Worcester, Mass., after 1847; traveled extensively promoting anti-slavery cause, later women's rights, and other 19th century social issues. From the description of Kelley-Foster papers, 1837-1893 (bulk 1837-1887). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70925918 Abigail Kelley Foster, wife of Stephen Symonds Foster (1809-1881) and noted antislaver...

Calkins, Caleb.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mb50fk (person)

Noyes, John Humphrey, 1811-1886

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Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, Mrs.

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Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879

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Anti-slavery advocate. From the description of Circular and letter, 1848 Jan. 21, Boston, to Rev. Mr. Russell, South Hingham. (Boston Athenaeum). WorldCat record id: 231311718 Abolitionist and reformer William Lloyd Garrison was founder of the Boston abolitionist paper, The Liberator, and the New England Anti-Slavery Society. From the description of Papers, 1835-1873 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232007257 Abolitionist and lectur...

Smith, Elizabeth Oakes Prince, 1806-1893

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Elizabeth Oakes Smith was a notably intelligent, talented, and accomplished 19th century American author. She first published poems in her husband's newspapers, began to write in earnest to alleviate financial concerns, and produced a remarkably capable and diverse body of work including poetry, essays, children's stories, novels, and non-fiction. She became one of the first women lecturers, speaking on women's rights and abolition. She was well-connected and well-respected by her peers, and mai...

Howe, S. G. (Samuel Gridley), 1801-1876

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Physician, reformer, and husband of Julia Ward Howe. From the description of Papers, 1868. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 46344998 Humanitarian crusader for many causes including Greek freedom, education for the disabled, prison reform, abolition, and black suffrage, Howe founded the Perkins School for the Blind and was the chairman of the Massachusetts Board of State Charities. When just out of the Harvard Medical School, he went to Greece as an army surgeon...

Weed, Thurlow, 1797-1882

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ks6xvp (person)

Thurlow Weed, politician and journalist, was born in Cairo, N.Y., on 15 November 1797. He married Catherine Ostrander in 1818. Weed was a leader of the anti-Masonic movement of the 1820's and 30's, a New York assemblyman from 1829-1831, and a key member of the Whig Party and then the Republican Party. From 1824-1826 Weed was the owner and editor of Rochester Telegraph. He published Anti-Masonic Enquirer, and from 1829-1863 he worked as a reporter and editor for the anti-Masons' paper, Albany Eve...

Mann, Horace, 1796-1859

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6sf2xnw (person)

Educator and innovator of the public school system in the United States. From the description of Letter, 1844, Feb. 26, Boston, [Mass.?] to "My dear sister" [i.e. Mrs. Rebecca Pennelf], Wrentham, Mass. (Fisk University). WorldCat record id: 39863863 American educator and social reformer. From the description of Autograph entry signed : Salem, Ohio, 1856 Mar. 25. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 639351466 U.S. representative from Massachusetts, reformer, co...

Howe, Julia Ward, 1819-1910

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64b3354 (person)

Julia Ward Howe was the author of the Battle hymn of the republic and other works and a women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which she wrote during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. in 1861. From the description of Papers concerning the Battle hymn of the republic, 1897-1906. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 80781526 Julia Ward Howe was the author of the Battle...

Pierpont, John, 1785-1866,

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w69p3cbp (person)

Unitarian clergyman, poet, and reformer. From the description of Papers of John Pierpont [manuscript], 1825-1885. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647953935 American poet. From the description of Passing away -- a dream : autograph manuscript copy of the poem signed, [1837 or later]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 560671584 John Pierpont was born in Connecticut in 1785; he graduated from Yale in 1804 and tried several professions before beco...

Stanton, Henry B. (Henry Brewster), 1805-1887

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6c82dn7 (person)

Journalist, lawyer, reformer, and New York state legislator. From the description of Henry B. Stanton correspondence, 1852-1857. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70980521 Anti-slavery orator; husband of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. From the description of Letter to Olive Risley Seward, 1871 October 19. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 49944554 ...

Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6vq340m (person)

Merchant and antislavery leader. From the description of The papers of Lewis Tappan [microform], 1809-1903. (Washington State University). WorldCat record id: 29852969 Abolitionist from New York State; assisted the Amistad slaves; among the founders of the American Missionary Association in 1846, which began more than 100 anti-slavery Congregational churches throughout the Midwest, and after the American Civil War, founded numerous schools and colleges to aid in the educatio...

Ray, Charles B.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jm2tgz (person)

White, Andrew Dickson, 1832-1918

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60v8bvt (person)

The second International Peace Conference was held at the Hague in 1907. From the description of Hague Peace Conference documents, 1907. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64052217 Ambassador to Russia; first president of Cornell University. From the description of Andrew Dickson White papers, 1901-1902. (New York State Historical Documents). WorldCat record id: 155410378 Andrew Dickson White was born at Homer, New York, November 7, 1832. ...

Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6dr30vg (person)

Abolitionist; orator; pastor of Plymouth Church, 1847-1887. From the description of Papers, [ca.1847]-1937, 1847-1887 (bulk) (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 155459715 American Congregational clergyman, lecturer, reformer, and author. From the guide to the Henry Ward Beecher papers, 1851-1896, n.d, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.) Congregationalist minister. From the description of Sermon notes, [n.d.], 1893, 18...

Delavan, Edward C. (Edward Cornelius), 1793-1871

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6t43vtw (person)

Schenectady, N.Y. temperance activist and publisher of temperance journals. From the description of Letter : Schenectady, to G.W. Clinton, Buffalo, 1869 Oct. 22. (Buffalo History Museum). WorldCat record id: 34657019 Reformer and businessman. From the description of Edward C. Delavan correspondence, 1834-1842. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79423585 ...

Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6sz739j (person)

Abolitionist, newspaper publisher; Kentucky state representative, 1835-1837, 1840; Kentucky governor, 1849; U.S. minister to Russia, 1860-1869. From the description of Correspondence, 1862, 1880. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 28397866 This is an artifically created collection of relating to the Kentucky Stateman and US diplomat Cassius M Clay. It consists of material related to his estate in Richmond, KY: White Hall as well as biographical artic...

Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6dw280k (person)

Epithet: Vice-president of the American Ethnological Society British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000561.0x0000a9 Author, Indian agent and ethnologist. From the description of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft papers, 1826-1841. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 34418398 Henry Schoolcraft was an ethnologist, geologist, Indian agent, and glass manufacturer. From th...

Liberty Party (Madison County, N.Y.)

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Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w63z8wtz (person)

Harriet Beecher Stowe (b. June 14, 1811, Litchfield, Connecticut – d. July 1, 1896, Hartford, Connecticut) was an American abolitionist and author. She is the daughter of Rev. Lyman Beecher who preached against slavery. She is best known for writing Uncle Tom's Cabin. It became an instant and controversial best-seller, both in the United States and abroad. The novel had a major impact on Northerners' attitudes toward slavery and by the beginning of the Civil War had sold more than a million copi...

Child, Lydia Maria, 1802-1880

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gt5qhr (person)

Lydia Child was born in Massachusetts and became known as an abolitionist for her tract entitled, "Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans called Africans," (1833). Child's letters to the Governor of Virginia were eventually published as an abolitionist book and she also authored a novel entitled "Hobomok," a story about Indians in colonial Massachusetts. From the description of Letter, [ca. 1842]. (Temple University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 122618414 Abolitionist,...

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, 1815-1902

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w69706n1 (person)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born in Johnstown, New York in 1815. She organized the first Women's Rights Convention at Senecca Falls, New York, in 1848 and for more than fifty years thereafter was a crusader for women's rights, especially women's suffrage. She died in New York City in 1902....

Smith, Gerrit, 1797-1874

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gb27r4 (person)

Congressman, philanthropist, reformer. From the description of Letter, 1840 May 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122379141 Gerrit Smith resided in Peterboro (N.H.?) at the time of these writings and was a strong supporter of emancipation and African American rights. Upon his death the African American citizens of Buffalo paid him a formal tribute. From the description of Letters and broadsides, 1868-1871. (Buffalo History Museum). WorldCat record id: 34178334 ...

Conkling, Roscoe, 1829-1888

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Roscoe Conkling was a New York politician and lawyer, serving in Congress as both Senator and Representative. He resigned abruptly to protest Federal appointments in New York, and returned to his law practice. He later declined an appointment to the United States Supreme Court. From the description of Roscoe Conkling letter to D.B. Sickels, 1876 Apr. 20. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 52734482 Roscoe Conkling was a Senator (1867-81) and Congre...

Grimké, Sarah Moore, 1792-1873

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6z3235s (person)

Abolitionist and women's rights advocate. From the description of Letter : Liverpool, to Jane Bettle, Philadelphia, 1828 Dec. 6. (Bryn Mawr College). WorldCat record id: 29231286 Reformer. From the description of Letters of Sarah Moore Grimké, 1843-1861. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79450580 Sarah Moore Grimke was a plantation owner from South Carolina who was active in the movements for abolition of slavery and women's rights. From the de...

Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x34xv4 (person)

Massachusetts lawyer and U.S. Senator, 1851-1874. He was an ardent abolitionist who attacked the south in his "crime against Kansas" speech in 1856. Two days later he was assaulted in the Senate, receiving injuries that took him years to recover from. From the description of Letters, 1858-1869. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 55768315 Born in Boston, Mass., the U.S. statesman Charles Sumner studied law at Harvard and practiced law in his native ci...

Littlejohn, De Witt Clinton, 1818-1892

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p96nzt (person)

Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6f47pbn (person)

Lawyer, politician, and statesman; principle residence and law practice was in Auburn, New York; Governor of New York State, 1838-1842; United State Senator, 1849-1861; U.S. Secretary of State, 1861-1869. From the description of Collection, 1828-1936; bulk 1828-1873. (New York State Library). WorldCat record id: 50872192 New York lawyer and U.S. Senator who served as Secretary of State for Abraham Lincoln. From the description of Letters, 1852-1888. (Abraham Linc...

Davis, Paulina W. (Paulina Wright), 1813-1876

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6sb4dtn (person)

Feminist, reformer, and suffragist, Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis was born in Bloomfield, N.Y. Her second marriage, in 1849, was to Thomas Davis, manufacturer and state representative; they adopted two daughters. For biographical information, see Notable American Women, 1607-1950 (1971). From the description of Letter, 1873. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232007096 Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis was a reformer interested in abolition, temperance, women's rights, and ...

Liberty Party (U.S. : 1840-1848)

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64j5jnm (corporateBody)

Peabody, Elizabeth Palmer, 1804-1894

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6fr0208 (person)

Elizabeth Palmer Peabody was at the center of the Transcendentalist movement in New England. Although she wrote and published many works, she is best remembered for her support and friendship of Emerson, Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller and many others. She published the journal Dial, founded the famous West Street Book Shop and Publishing House, and introduced kindergarten to America. From the description of Elizabeth Palmer Peabody letters, 1846-1854. (Pennsylvania State University Libra...