Mary Church Terrell Papers 1851-1962 (bulk 1886-1954)

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Mary Church Terrell Papers 1851-1962 (bulk 1886-1954)

African-American civil rights leader, lecturer, and educator. Correspondence, diaries, printed material, clippings, speeches and writings, and other papers focusing primarily on Terrell's career as an advocate of women's rights and equal treatment for African Americans.

13,000 items; 51 containers plus 1 oversize; 22.5 linear feet; 34 microfilm reels

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Related Entities

There are 42 Entities related to this resource.

Terrell family.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gc1h84 (family)

Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia, 1892-1975

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6348t1j (person)

Addams, Jane, 1860-1935

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jr1sc6 (person)

Social reformer; founder of Hull House settlement, Chicago. From the description of Letter: Hull-House, Chicago, to Louis J. Keller, Chicago, 1912 May 13. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 26496308 From the description of Letter: Hull-House, Chicago, to Paul M. Angle, Springfield, Ill., 1932 June 24. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 26496294 Founder of Hull House in Chicago. From the description of Cor...

Randolph, A. Philip, 1889-1979

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jj4bwm (person)

Asa Philip Randolph (born April 15, 1889, Cresent City, Florida-died May 16, 1979, New York City), African-American labor leader and early civil rights spokesman. Influenced by the socialism of Eugene Debs, Randolph began publishing his magazine The Messenger in 1917. He opposed U.S. entry into the first World War. In 1925 he organized the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. His associations with Bayard Rustin and James Farmer influenced his dedication to nonviolence. Randolph was a founder of ...

Simms, Ruth Hanna McCormick, 1880-1944

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p37pkm (person)

Ruth Hanna McCormick (née Ruth Hanna, also known as Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms; March 27, 1880 – December 31, 1944), was an American politician, activist, and publisher. She served one term in the United States House of Representatives, winning an at-large seat in Illinois in 1928. She gave up the chance to run for re-election to seek a United States Senate seat from Illinois. She defeated the incumbent, Senator Charles S. Deneen, in the Republican primary, becoming the first female Senate candi...

De Priest, Oscar, 1871-1951

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w68h9b01 (person)

Oscar Stanton De Priest (March 9, 1871 – May 12, 1951) was an American politician and civil rights advocate from Chicago. A member of the Illinois Republican Party, he was the first African American to be elected to Congress in the 20th century. During his three terms, he was the only African American serving in Congress. He served as a U.S. Representative from Illinois' 1st congressional district from 1929 to 1935. De Priest was also the first African-American U.S. Representative from outside t...

Woodson, Carter Godwin, 1875-1950

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6h23s6h (person)

Carter Godwin Woodson, educator and historian, was considered the Father of Black History. He was born December 19, 1875, New Canton, Virginia. He was an African-American historian, author, and journalist who, in 1915, founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. In 1926 he pioneered the concept of a "Negro History Week," which was later expanded into Black History Month. Woodson died at his home in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C., on April 3, 1950....

Bethune, Mary McLeod, 1875-1955

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6g55fc3 (person)

Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (born Mary Jane McLeod; July 10, 1875 – May 18, 1955) was an American educator, stateswoman, philanthropist, humanitarian, womanist, and civil rights activist. Bethune founded the National Council for Negro Women in 1935, established the organization's flagship journal Aframerican Women's Journal, and resided as president or leader for myriad African American women's organizations including the National Association for Colored Women and the National Youth Administration'...

Rankin, Jeannette, 1880-1973

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6650d62 (person)

Jeannette Pickering Rankin (June 11, 1880 – May 18, 1973) was an American politician and women's rights advocate, and the first woman to hold federal office in the United States. She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican from Montana in 1916, and again in 1940. Rankin graduated from the University of Montana in 1902. She subsequently attended the New York School of Philanthropy (later the New York, then the Columbia, School of Social Work) before embarking on a care...

National Woman's Party

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National Woman’s Party (NWP), formerly (1913–16) Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, American political party that in the early part of the 20th century employed militant methods to fight for an Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Formed in 1913 as the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, the organization was headed by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns. Its members had been associated with the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), but their insistence that woman suffr...

Harper, Ida Husted, 1851-1931

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w65j85qd (person)

Ida A. Husted Harper, née Ida A. Husted, (born Feb. 18, 1851, Fairfield, Ind., U.S.—died March 14, 1931, Washington, D.C.), journalist and suffragist, remembered for her writings in the popular press for and about women and for her contributions to the documentation of the woman suffrage movement. Ida Husted married Thomas W. Harper, a lawyer, in 1871 and settled in Terre Haute, Indiana. Her husband became a prominent attorney and politician and an associate of socialist leader Eugene V. Debs, a...

Washington, Margaret James Murray, 1865-1925

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6vj6c9z (person)

Margaret Murray Washington (March 9, 1865 - June 4, 1925) was the principal of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, which later became Tuskegee University. She was the third wife of Booker T. Washington. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1972. Margaret Murray was born on March 9 in Macon, Mississippi, in the early 1860s. Her birth year is unknown; her tombstone says she was born in 1865, but the 1870 census lists her birth year as 1861. She was one of ten children...

War Camp Community Service (U.S.)

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Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gk06z2 (person)

W. E. B. Du Bois was an American sociologist, socialist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, writer and editor. Educated at Fisk University, he did graduate work at the University of Berlin and Harvard, where he was the first African American to earn a doctorate. Du Bois became a professor of history, sociology and economics at Atlanta University. Due to his contributions in the African-American community he was seen as a member of a Black elite that supported some aspects ...

Coordinating Committee for the Enforcement of the D.C. Anti-Discrimination Laws

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Formed in 1949 through the efforts of Mary Church Terrell and Annie Stein after the D.C. Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild issued an opinion that anti-discrimination laws passed in 1872 and 1873 were valid; members of the committee provoked an incident by having three "well-dressed, well-behaved" African Americans seek service in Thompson's Restaurant, they were refused service and filed a suit in the District of Columbia Municipal Court against the restaurant where the judge ruled that thes...

Brawley, Benjamin Griffith, 1882-1939

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6tf01qk (person)

Professor of English and writer on African American literary and social history; faculty member at Howard University and Morehouse College; president of Alabama Baptist Normal and Theological School. From the description of Benjamin Griffith Brawley papers, 1917-1936. (Moorland-Spingarn Resource Center). WorldCat record id: 741693799 1882, April 22 Born to Edward M. and Margaret Saphronia (Dickerson) Brawley, ...

International Purity Conference

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66j2jsw (corporateBody)

Katz, Maude White

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67s7rq3 (person)

Stein, Annie

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67d2zk3 (person)

"The average child in eighty-five percent of the Black and Puerto Rican schools is functionally illiterate after eight years of schooling in the richest city in the world. This is a massive accomplishment." These first sentences, from an essay Annie Stein wrote for the Harvard Educational Review in 1971, encapsulate a lifetime of radical activism, a career in statistical research, and a habit of righteous anger. For nearly 50 years-- working through labor unions, civil r...

Hunton, Addie W., 1866-

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6wf1xj3 (person)

National Purity Conference

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6fv6nk7 (corporateBody)

Young Women's Christian Association

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6w778t1 (corporateBody)

The YWCA of Washington State College was established in 1895. It provided the women of the college a place to worship, held bible classes, and located housing and employment. It also served as a social organization that participated with the YMCA of Washington State College. A popular social event in the 1910s-1930s were the conferences held at Seabeck, Washington. Topics at Seabeck focused on issues of the YWCA and the YMCA of the Pacific Northwest. During the 1940s, th...

Trotter, William Monroe, 1872-1934

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67w6gm3 (person)

Villard, Oswald Garrison, 1872-1949

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6br8w09 (person)

Epithet: US journalist British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000429.0x000092 Villard, a journalist and author, was president of the New York Evening Post (1897-1918), editor and owner of The Nation (1918-1932), publisher and contributing editor of The Nation (1932-1935), a founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and of Yachting Magazine, and owner of the Nautical Gazette. His father ...

Garrison, Francis Jackson, 1848-1916

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w63b63fj (person)

Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6h814sk (person)

Booker T. Washington was an African American educator and public figure. Born a slave on a small farm in Hale's Ford, Virginia, he worked his way through the Hampton Institute and became an instructor there. He was the first principal of the Tuskegee Institute, and under his management it became a successful center for practical education. A forceful and charismatic personality, he became a national figure through his books and lectures. Although his conservative views concerned many critics, he...

Patterson, William L. (William Lorenzo), 1890-1980

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6xw54q4 (person)

Noted political activist, lawyer, orator, organizer, writer, and Communist from San Franicsco, Calif.; also known as "Mr. Civil Rights." He also lived in New York from the mid-1950s to 1979. From the description of William Lorenzo Patterson papers, 1919-1979 (bulk, mid-1950s-1979). (Moorland-Spingarn Resource Center). WorldCat record id: 729372659 ...

National American Woman Suffrage Association

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mw6c23 (corporateBody)

Formed in 1890 by the merger of the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association. From the description of National American Woman Suffrage Association records, 1839-1961 bulk (1890-1930). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70979907 The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was formed in 1890 with the merger of the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association. NAWSA fought for complete political ...

Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6n40kzp (person)

Herbert Clark Hoover (b. August 10, 1874, Iowa-d. October 20, 1964), thirty-first president of the United States, was born in Iowa, and was orphaned as a child. A Quaker known from his childhood as "Bert" to his friends, he began a career as a mining engineer soon after graduating from Stanford University in 1895. Within twenty years he had used his engineering knowledge and business acumen to make a fortune as an independent mining consultant. In 1914 Hoover administered the American Relief Com...

Coolidge, Calvin, 1872-1933

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6f29nmw (person)

Epithet: president of the United States British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000497.0x00001d Calvin Coolidge's son John married John Trumbull's daughter Florence. From the description of Letter, 1931 March 16, Northampton, Mass., to John H. Trumbull, Plainville, Conn. (Hartford Public Library). WorldCat record id: 25622017 For information on Pres. Coolidge, see an encyclopedia. No information is...

Stokes, Anson Phelps, 1874-1958

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6th8q5d (person)

Anson Phelps Stokes was born on April 13, 1874, in New Brighton, Staten Island, New York. He received degrees from Yale University (B.A., 1896) and the Episcopal Theological School (B.D., 1900). He served as Secretary of Yale University (1899-1921) and was active on several University committees and organizations. Phelps also served as Canon of the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul, Washington, D.C. (1924-1939) and was active on a variety of educational commissions and as a trustee of the Phel...

Fleetwood, Christian Abraham, 1840-1914

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gm8b84 (person)

Fleetwood was born in Baltimore on July 21, 1840, the son of Charles and Anna Maria Fleetwood, both were free persons of color. He received his early education in the home of a wealthy sugar merchant and chairman of Baltimore's chamber of commerce, John C. Brunes, and his wife. The latter treated Fleetwood like her son and taught him to read and write. He continued his education at the Maryland State Colonization Society, went briefly to Liberia and Sierra Leone, and graduated in 1860 from Ashmu...

Burroughs, Nannie Helen, 1879-1961

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6zc85t5 (person)

In 1879, Nannie Helen Burroughs was born to a formerly enslaved couple living in Orange, Virginia. Her father died when she was young, and she and her mother relocated to Washington, DC. Burroughs excelled in school and graduated with honors from M Street High School (now Paul Laurence Dunbar High School). Despite her academic achievements, Burroughs was turned down for a Washington D.C. public school teaching position. Some historians speculate that the elite black community discriminated again...

Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6222w4f (person)

Mary Church Terrell was born Sept. 23, 1863 in Memphis, TN. Her parents, Robert Reed Church and Louisa Ayers, were freed slaves. She majored in Classics at Oberlin College, the first college in the United States to accept African American and female students; she was one of the first African American women to attend the institution. Terrell graduated in 1884 with Anna Julia Cooper and Ida Gibbs Hunt. She earned her master's degree in Education from Oberlin in 1888. She began teaching at Wilberfo...

National Association of Colored Women (U.S.)

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Terrell family.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6m166dw (family)

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6d83477 (corporateBody)

WILPF developed out of the International Women's Congress against World War I that took place in The Hague, Netherlands, in 1915 and the formation of the International Women's Committee of Permanent Peace; the name WILPF was not chosen until 1919. The first WILPF president, Jane Addams, had previously founded the Woman's Peace Party in the United States, in January 1915, this group later became the US section of WILPF. Along with Jane Addams, Marian Cripps and Margaret E. Dungan were also foundi...

Wells, H. G. (Herbert George), 1866-1946

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6193wj9 (person)

H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells (b. September 21, 1866, Bromley, Kent, England-d. August 13, 1946, London, England), best remembered for imaginative novels such as The Invisible Man and The War of the Worlds, prototypes for modern science fiction, was a prolific writer and one of the most versatile in the history of English letters. He produced an average of nearly three books a year for more than fifty years, in addition to hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles. His works ranged from f...

Meyer, Eugene, 1875-1959

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6m61n2m (person)

Newspaperman. From the description of Papers of Eugene Meyer, 1819-1970. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 83145968 Financier, newspaper executive. From the description of Reminiscences of Eugene Meyer : oral history, 1953. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 309733277 ...

Harding, Warren Gamaliel, 1865-1923

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jr1px4 (person)

Warren Gamaliel Harding (b. November 2, 1865, Blooming Grove, Ohio-d. August 2, 1923, San Francisco, California) was an American politician who served as the 29th President of the United States from March 4, 1921 until his death in 1923....

Catt, Carrie Chapman, 1859-1947

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6hr4p19 (person)

Carrie Lane Chapman Catt, suffragist, early feminist, political activist, and Iowa State alumna (1880), was born on January 9, 1859 in Ripon, Wisconsin to Maria Clinton and Lucius Lane. At the close of the Civil War, the Lanes moved to a farm near Charles City, Iowa where they remained throughout their lives. Carrie entered Iowa State College in 1877 completing her work in three years. She graduated at the top of her class and while in Ames established military drills for women, became the first...

Handy, W. C. (William Christopher), 1873-1958

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64f1rv7 (person)

African American composer known as "Father of the Blues; bandmaster for Mahara's Minstrels in Chicago, Ill.; founder of Pace and Handy Music Company. From the description of W.C. Handy papers, 1900-1979. (Fisk University). WorldCat record id: 70972574 African Americna composer and musician as well as music publisher in New York. He was known as the "father of the blues" because he codified, composed and popularized the blues songs. From the description of Letter,...