Records of the National Park Service, 1785 - 2006. National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 - 2017

ArchivalResource

Records of the National Park Service, 1785 - 2006. National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 - 2017

Records of the National Park Service, 1785 - 2006. National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 - 2017

2013-2017

This series contains records documenting the building, architectural, and cultural aspects of places officially designated as worthy of historic preservation. The records capture the nomination process, the evaluation of the properties and the steps involved in the listing of the property. The series includes properties from every one of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Properties appear in one of three areas: Multiple Property Submission, Single Property Listings, and National Historic Landmarks. Each registered place is designated within one of three categories: multiple property, single property, or national historic landmark. Among the attributes provided about each property are: name, address, list date, period of significance, theme or historic context, and architectural classification. When known or important additional descriptive elements about properties include architect or builder, significant person, and major changes.

94,373 Portable Document Format files (PDF), 158 electronic documentation files in Portable Document Format, 334 electronic documentation files in Excel, and 1 linear foot, 8 linear inches of paper documentation

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There are 79 Entities related to this resource.

Rankin, Jeannette, 1880-1973

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Jeannette Pickering Rankin (June 11, 1880 – May 18, 1973) was an American politician and women's rights advocate, and the first woman to hold federal office in the United States. She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican from Montana in 1916, and again in 1940. Rankin graduated from the University of Montana in 1902. She subsequently attended the New York School of Philanthropy (later the New York, then the Columbia, School of Social Work) before embarking on a care...

Caraway, Hattie Wyatt, 1878-1950

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Hattie Ophelia Wyatt Caraway (February 1, 1878 – December 21, 1950) was an American politician who became the first woman elected to serve a full term as a United States Senator. Caraway represented Arkansas. She was the first woman to preside over the Senate. She won reelection to a full term in 1932 with the active support of fellow Senator Huey Long, of neighboring Louisiana. She was the first woman to win a election for the United States Senate. A native of Humphreys County, Tennessee, Ha...

Felton, Rebecca Latimer, 1835-1930

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Rebecca Ann Latimer Felton (June 10, 1835 – January 24, 1930) was an American writer, lecturer, reformer, and politician who became the first woman to serve in the US Senate, although she served for only one day. She was the most prominent woman in Georgia in the Progressive Era, and was honored by appointment to the Senate. She was sworn in November 21, 1922, and served just 24 hours. At 87 years, nine months, and 22 days old, she was the oldest freshman senator to enter the Senate. She was the...

Ferguson, Miriam Amanda, 1875-1961

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Miriam Amanda Wallace (Ma) Ferguson (1875-1961), first female Governor of Texas, was born in Bell County, Texas, on June 13, 1875. She attended Salado College and Baylor Female College at Belton. In 1899, she married James Edward Ferguson. From 1915 to 1917, Mrs. Ferguson served as the first lady of Texas until her husband's impeachment during his second administration. When James Ferguson failed to get his name on the ballot in 1924, Miriam entered the race for the Texas governorship. Defeating...

Ross, Nellie Tayloe, 1876-1977

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Nellie Davis Tayloe Ross (November 29, 1876 – December 19, 1977) was an American politician, the 14th governor of Wyoming from 1925 to 1927 and director of the United States Mint from 1933 to 1953. She was the first woman to be sworn in as governor of a U.S. state, and remains the only woman to have served as governor of Wyoming. Born in St. Joseph, Missouri she lived in Miltonvale, Kansas and Omaha, Nebraska before moving to Cheyenne, Wyoming with her husband, lawyer William Bradford Ross, w...

Taft, Helen Herron, 1861-1943

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Helen “Nellie” Taft was the wife of President William Howard Taft and First Lady of the United States from 1909 to 1913. During their marriage, she relished travel to Japan, China, and diplomatic missions around the world. As “the only unusual incident” of her girlhood, “Nellie” Herron Taft recalled her visit to the White House at 17 as the guest of President and Mrs. Hayes, intimate friends of her parents. Fourth child of Harriet Collins and John W. Herron, born in 1861, she had grown up in ...

McKinley, Ida Saxton, 1847-1907

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Ida Saxton McKinley was the wife of the 25th President, William McKinley. She served as First Lady of the United States from 1897 to 1901. There was little resemblance between the vivacious young woman who married William McKinley in January 1871–a slender bride with sky-blue eyes and fair skin and masses of auburn hair–and the petulant invalid who moved into the White House with him in March 1897. Now her face was pallid and drawn, her close-cropped hair gray; her eyes were glazed with pain ...

Cleveland, Frances Folsom, 1864-1947

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Frances Clara Folsom Cleveland became the youngest First Lady at age 21 as the first woman to marry a president in the White House. She served as the 23rd and 25th First Lady of the United States while married to President Grover Cleveland. “I detest him so much that I don’t even think his wife is beautiful.” So spoke one of President Grover Cleveland’s political foes–the only person, it seems, to deny the loveliness of this notable First Lady, first bride of a President to be married in the ...

Hayes, Lucy Webb, 1831-1889

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Lucy Ware Webb Hayes served as First Lady of the United States as the wife of the 19th President, Rutherford B. Hayes (1877-1881). Nicknamed affectionately both “Mother Lucy” and “Lemonade Lucy”, she was well known for caring for wounded infantrymen in her husband’s command during the Civil War and for her staunch support of the temperance movement, respectively. She came to the White House well loved by many. Born in Chillicothe, Ohio, daughter of Maria Cook and Dr. James Webb, she lost her ...

Grant, Julia Dent, 1826-1902

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Julia Boggs Dent Grant, hailing from a plantation near St. Louis, was the wife of United States war hero and the 18th President, Ulysses S. Grant. She served as First Lady of from 1869 to 1877. Daughter of Frederick and Ellen Wrenshall Dent, Julia had grown up on a plantation near St. Louis in a typically Southern atmosphere. She attended the Misses Mauros’ boarding school in St. Louis for seven years among the daughters of other affluent parents. A social favorite in that circle, she met “Ul...

Lincoln, Mary Todd, 1818-1882

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Mary Ann Todd Lincoln was the wife of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. She served as First Lady from 1861 until his assassination in 1865 at Ford’s Theatre. Daughter of Eliza Parker and Robert Smith Todd, pioneer settlers of Kentucky, Mary lost her mother before the age of seven. Her father remarried; and Mary remembered her childhood as “desolate” although she belonged to the aristocracy of Lexington, with high-spirited social life and a sound private education. Just...

Pierce, Jane M. (Jane Means), 1806-1863

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Jane Means Appleton Pierce was the wife of the 14th President, Franklin Pierce. She served as First Lady of the United States from 1853 to 1857. Born in Hampton, New Hampshire and raised in Brunswick, Maine, after the death of her father, Jane Appleton's mother had taken the family to Amherst, New Hampshire. While there, Jane met a Bowdoin graduate, a young lawyer with political ambitions, Franklin Pierce. Although Pierce was immediately devoted to Jane, they did not marry until she was 28...

Fillmore, Abigail Powers, 1798-1853

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Abigail Powers Fillmore had first met husband President Millard Fillmore when he was her student, and as a teacher she had been the first First Lady to have held a job after marriage. During her time as a First Lady (1850-1853), she made certain the White House had a music room and three pianos, and she further made additions to the White House library. First of First Ladies to hold a job after marriage, Abigail Fillmore was helping her husband’s career. She was also revealing her most striki...

Tyler, Julia Gardiner, 1820-1889

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The darling of the capital, Julia Gardiner Tyler was the second wife of the tenth President, John Tyler. She became First Lady from 1844 to 1845 after their secret engagement and wedding. Daughter of Juliana McLachlan and David Gardiner, descendant of prominent and wealthy New York families, Julia was trained from earliest childhood for a life in society; she made her debut at 15. A European tour with her family gave her new glimpses of social splendors. Late in 1842 the Gardiners went to Was...

Harrison, Anna Tuthill Symmes, 1775-1864

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Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys. As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the “north bend” of the Ohio River. She had...

Monroe, Elizabeth, 1768-1830

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Romance glints from the little that is known about Elizabeth Kortright’s early life. She was born in New York City in 1768, daughter of an old New York family. Her father, Lawrence, had served the Crown by privateering during the French and Indian War and made a fortune. He took no active part in the War of Independence; and James Monroe wrote to his friend Thomas Jefferson in Paris in 1786 that he had married the daughter of a gentleman, “injured in his fortunes” by the Revolution. Strange c...

Washington, Martha, 1731-1802

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Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was the first First Lady of the United States. Washington is not only remembered as the nation’s first lady who set an example for her future first ladies, but also as a wife, mother, and property owner. She is an example of strength during the Revolutionary War, and as the first lady of a new nation. Born at Virginia’s Chestnut Grove Plantation located in New Kent County, Virginia on June 2, 1731, she was the eldest of eight children born to John and France...

Niagara Movement (Organization)

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The Niagara Movement emerged out of years of struggle against racial oppression in the United States and frustration with the slow pace of change on the one hand and the moderate, accommodationist policies of Booker T. Washington on the other. In February 1905, W. E. B. Du Bois and William Monroe Trotter helped call together an all-black "national strategy board" to chart a new and more radical course toward social and racial justice. Inviting fifty nine like-minded intellectuals and activists t...

Hunt, Jane Clothier, 1812-1889

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Jane Clothier Hunt (26 June 1812 – 28 November 1889) was an American Quaker who hosted the Seneca Falls meeting of Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Born in Philadelphia in 1812 to William and Mary Master, she moved to Waterloo in New York in 1845 when she married fellow Quaker Richard Pell Hunt, a prominent local businessman and landowner. As progressive Quakers, Hunt and her husband were believers in social reform and humanitarian causes. They were both active supporters of abolitio...

Jacobi, Mary Putnam, 1842-1906

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Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi (August 31, 1842 – June 10, 1906) was an esteemed American medical physician, teacher, scientist, writer, and suffragist. She was the first woman to study medicine at the University of Paris, and had a long career practicing medicine, teaching, writing, and advocating for women's rights, especially in medical education. Disparaging anecdotal evidence and traditional approaches, she demanded rigorous scientific research on every question of the day. Her scientific rebut...

Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952

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Frances Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864 – May 16, 1952) was an early American photographer and photojournalist whose career lasted for almost half a century. She is most known for her portraits, images of southern architecture, and various photographic series featuring African Americans and Native Americans at the turn of the 20th century. In the 1880s, Johnston studied art in Paris and then returned home to Washington, DC, where she learned photography. She quickly established a national...

Jones, Rosalie, 1883-1978

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6d32n3j (person)

Rosalie Gardiner Jones (February 24, 1883 – January 12, 1978) was an American suffragette. She took the "Pankhursts" as role models and after hearing of the "Brown Women" she organised marches to draw attention to the suffrage cause. She was known as "General Jones" because of her following. Born in New York City, Jones grew up on Long Island, New York, and eventually attended Adelphi College. She subsequently received a law degree from Brooklyn Law School, would go on to study at several sch...

Shaw, Anna Howard, 1847-1919

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Anna Howard Shaw (February 14, 1847 – July 2, 1919) was a leader of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. She was also a physician and one of the first ordained female Methodist ministers in the United States. Born in northern England in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1847, her family left England and immigrated to the United States. In their new country, the Shaws made several moves. After settling in the bustling port city of New Bedford, Massachusetts, they uprooted again, this time ...

Dukakis, Michael S. (Michael Stanley), 1933-

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Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is a retired American politician who served as the 65th governor of Massachusetts, from 1975 to 1979 and again from 1983 to 1991. He is the longest-serving governor in Massachusetts history and only the second Greek-American governor in U.S. history, after Spiro Agnew. He was nominated by the Democratic Party for president in the 1988 election, losing to the Republican candidate, Vice President George H. W. Bush. Born in Brookline, Massachusetts...

Anderson, John B. (John Bayard), 1922-2017

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John Bayard Anderson (February 15, 1922 – December 3, 2017) was a United States politician from Illinois. As a member of the Republican Party, he served in the United States House of Representatives, representing Illinois's 16th congressional district from 1961 to 1981. In 1980, he ran an independent campaign for president, receiving 6.6% of the popular vote. Born in Rockford, Illinois, Anderson practiced law after serving in the Army during World War II. After a stint in the United States Fo...

Davis, John W. (John William), 1873-1955

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mq5sp1 (person)

John William Davis (April 13, 1873 – March 24, 1955) was an American politician, diplomat and lawyer. He served under President Woodrow Wilson as the Solicitor General of the United States and the United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He was the Democratic nominee for president in 1924 and lost to Republican incumbent Calvin Coolidge. Born and raised in West Virginia, Davis briefly worked as a teacher before beginning his long legal career. Davis's father, John J. Davis, had been a ...

M'Clintock, Mary Ann, 1800-1884

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6pp9w3f (person)

Mary Ann M'Clintock or Mary Ann McClintock (February 20, 1800 - May 21, 1884) is best known for her role in the formation of the women's suffrage movement, as well as abolitionism. Born Mary Ann Wilson in Burlington, New Jersey of Quaker parents, she attended Westtown School in 1814 for one year. In 1820, she married fellow Quaker Thomas M’Clintock, a druggist and Biblical scholar, and with him moved to 107 South 9th Street where he kept his drugstore. Here their children, Elizabeth, Mary Ann...

Lockwood, Belva Ann, 1830-1917

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Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood (October 24, 1830 – May 19, 1917) was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women's rights, including women's suffrage. Lockwood overcame many social and personal obstacles related to gender restrictions. After college, she became a teacher and principal, working to equalize pay for women in education. She supported the movement for world peace, and was a proponent of the Temperance movement. Lockwood graduated from la...

Ruffin, Josephine St. Pierre, 1842-1924

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Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (August 31, 1842 – March 13, 1924) was an African-American publisher, journalist, civil rights leader, suffragist, and editor of Woman's Era, the first national newspaper published by and for African-American women. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, she attended public schools in Charlestown and Salem, and a private school in New York City because of her parents' objections to the segregated schools in Boston. She completed her studies at the Bowdoin School after segr...

Rincón de Gautier, Felisa, 1897-1994

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Felisa Rincón de Gautier (born Felisa Rincón Marrero) (also known as Doña Fela) (January 9, 1897 – September 16, 1994) was the first woman to be elected as the Mayor of a capital city in The Americas. Rincón de Gautier was born on January 9, 1897 in Ceiba, Puerto Rico. She went to school in Fajardo, Humacao and Santurce although she did not graduate from high school; in the summers she visited her uncle in San Lorenzo where she learned how to prepare medications pharmacy and became a pharmaci...

Milholland, Inez, 1886-1916

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Inez Milholland Boissevain (August 6, 1886 – November 25, 1916) was a suffragist, labor lawyer, socialist, World War I correspondent, and public speaker who greatly influenced the women's movement in America. She was active in the National Woman's Party and a key participant in the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession. Born to a wealthy family in Brooklyn, New York, Milholland grew up in New York City and London. While in England, she met the militant suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst and became a poli...

Palin, Sarah, 1964-

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Sarah Louise Palin (née Heath; born February 11, 1964) is an American politician, commentator, author, and reality television personality, who served as the ninth governor of Alaska from 2006 until her resignation in 2009. As the Republican Party nominee for Vice President of the United States in the 2008 election alongside presidential nominee, Arizona Senator John McCain, she was the first Alaskan on the national ticket of a major political party, the first Republican female selected as a vice...

Garner, John Nance, 1868-1967

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John Nance Garner was born on November 22, 1868, in post-Civil War Texas. He grew up in a log cabin at Blossom Prairie in Red River County in Northeast Texas. His father, John Nance Garner III, came to Texas from Tennessee, served in the Confederate army, and settled after the war in Red River County. The elder Garner became a successful cotton farmer and local politician in his home county. Garner's mother, Sarah Guest Garner, the daughter of a banker, encouraged her son's education. The young ...

Tyler Junior College

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Tyler Junior College (TJC) is a public community college in Tyler, Texas. It is one of the largest community colleges in Texas, with an enrollment of more than 12,500 credit students each year with an additional 20,000 continuing education enrollments annually. Its TJC West location includes continuing education and workforce training programs and TJC North in Lindale, Texas offers general education classes, nursing programs, and the veterinary technician associate of applied science. The colleg...

McDaniel College

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McDaniel College is a private liberal arts college in Westminster, Maryland. Established in 1867, it was known as Western Maryland College until 2002 when it was renamed McDaniel College in honor of an alumnus who gave a lifetime of service to the college. The college also has a satellite campus, McDaniel College Budapest, in Budapest, Hungary. McDaniel College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The college owns and manages a shopping center and residential proper...

Colfax, Schuyler, 1823-1885

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Schuyler Colfax Jr. (March 23, 1823 – January 13, 1885) was an American journalist, businessman, and politician who served as the 17th Vice President of the United States from 1869 to 1873, and prior to that as the 25th Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1863 to 1869. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for Indiana's 9th congressional district as a member of the anti-slavery Indiana People's Party in 1854, Colfax joined the Republican Party during his first term. He served as ...

Cobb, Howell, 1815-1868

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Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815-October 9, 1868) was an American lawyer and diplomat. He served as congressman (1843-51; 1855-57), Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (1849-51), governor of Georgia (1851-53), and secretary of the treasury (1857-60). Following Georgia's secession from the Union in 1861, he served as president of the Provisional Confederate Congress (1861-62) and a major general of the Confederate army. Cobb was born in Jefferson County on September 7, 1815, the eldest ...

Barbour, Philip Pendleton, 1783-1841

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Philip Pendleton Barbour (May 25, 1783 – February 25, 1841) was the tenth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He is the only individual to serve in both positions. A native of Orange County, Virginia, Barbour was the youngest of four sons and fifth of eight children of Thomas Barbour and Mary Pendleton Thomas Barbour. Barbour's father served in the House of Burgesses from 1769 to 1776 and in the first four R...

Cheves, Langdon, 1776-1857

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Langdon Cheves (September 17, 1776 – June 26, 1857) was an American politician, lawyer and businessman from South Carolina. He was a U. S. Representative from 1810 to 1815, served as Speaker of the House in 1814–1815, and was president of the Second Bank of the United States from 1819 to 1822. Langdon Cheves was born at Bull Town Fort, on the Rocky River in South Carolina. His father, Alexander, was a native of Scotland; his mother, Mary Langdon, was from Virginia. At the age of ten he went t...

Macon, Nathaniel, 1757-1837

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Nathaniel Macon (December 17, 1757 – June 29, 1837) was an American politician who represented North Carolina in both houses of Congress. He was the fifth Speaker of the House, serving from 1801 to 1807. He was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1791 to 1815 and a member of the United States Senate from 1815 to 1828. He opposed ratification of the United States Constitution and the Federalist economic policies of Alexander Hamilton. Thomas Jefferson dubbed him "Ultimas R...

Sedgwick, Theodore, 1746-1813

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Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746 – January 24, 1813) was an American attorney, politician and jurist, who served in elected state government and as a Delegate to the Continental Congress, a U.S. Representative, and a United States Senator from Massachusetts. He served as the fourth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. He was appointed to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 1802 and served there the rest of his life. Born in West Hartford in the Connecticut Colony, Sedg...

Muhlenberg, Frederick Augustus Conrad, 1750-1801

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6xf1r22 (person)

Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg, second son of renowned Lutheran pastor Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, was born in Trappe, Pennsylvania, on January 1, 1750. Sent with his brothers Peter and Henry to the University of Halle, Germany, in 1763, Frederick returned to America in 1770 and was ordained a Lutheran minister. On October 15, 1771, Frederick married Catherine Schaeffer, the daughter of wealthy Philadelphia sugar refiner David Schaeffer. Frederick served congregations in the area of Scha...

Clinton, George, 1739-1812

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George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and statesman, considered one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A prominent Democratic-Republican, Clinton served as the fourth vice president of the United States from 1805 until his death in 1812. He also served as governor of New York from 1777 to 1795 and from 1801 to 1804. Along with John C. Calhoun, he is one of two vice presidents to hold office under two presidents. Clinton served in the French and Ind...

Gerry, Elbridge, 1744-1814

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Elbridge Thomas Gerry (July 17, 1744 (OS July 6, 1744) – November 23, 1814) was an American politician and diplomat. As a Democratic-Republican he served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from March 1813 until his death in November 1814. The political practice of gerrymandering is named after Gerry. Born into a wealthy merchant family, Gerry vocally opposed British colonial policy in the 1760s and was active in the early stages of organizing the re...

Tompkins, Daniel D., 1774-1825

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Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an American politician. He was the fourth governor of New York from 1807 to 1817, and the sixth vice president of the United States from 1817 to 1825. Born in Scarsdale, New York, Tompkins practiced law in New York City after graduating from Columbia College. He was a delegate to the 1801 New York constitutional convention and served on the New York Supreme Court from 1804 to 1807. In 1807, he defeated incumbent Morgan Lewis to become the...

Calhoun, John C. (John Caldwell), 1782-1850

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John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is remembered for strongly defending slavery and for advancing the concept of minority states' rights in politics. He did this in the context of protecting the interests of the white South when its residents were outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, mo...

Johnson, Richard M. (Richard Mentor), 1780-1850

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mx36kz (person)

Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a politician and the ninth vice president of the United States from 1837 to 1841. He is the only vice president elected by the United States Senate under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment. Johnson also represented Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate; he began and ended his political career in the Kentucky House of Representatives. Johnson was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1806 in the...

Dallas, George Mifflin, 1792-1864

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George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792 – December 31, 1864) was an American politician and diplomat who served as mayor of Philadelphia from 1828 to 1829 and as the 11th vice president of the United States from 1845 to 1849. The son of Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas, George Dallas attended elite preparatory schools before embarking on a legal career. He served as the private secretary to Albert Gallatin and worked for the Treasury Department and the Second Bank of the United Stat...

Breckinridge, John C. (John Cabell), 1821-1875

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John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875) was an American lawyer, politician, and soldier. He represented Kentucky in both houses of Congress and became the 14th and youngest-ever vice president of the United States, serving from 1857 to 1861. He was a member of the Democratic Party, and served in the U.S. Senate during the outbreak of the American Civil War, but was expelled after joining the Confederate Army. He was appointed Confederate secretary of war in 1865. Breckinrid...

Hendricks, Thomas A. (Thomas Andrews), 1819-1885

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6m32zmv (person)

Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was an American politician and lawyer from Indiana who served as the 16th governor of Indiana from 1873 to 1877 and the 21st vice president of the United States from March to November 1885. Hendricks represented Indiana in the U.S. House of Representatives (1851–55) and the U.S. Senate (1863–69). He also represented Shelby County, Indiana, in the Indiana General Assembly (1848–50) and as a delegate to the 1851 Indiana constitutiona...

Morton, Levi P. (Levi Parsons), 1824-1920

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Levi Parsons Morton (May 16, 1824 – May 16, 1920) was the 22nd vice president of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He also served as United States ambassador to France, as a US representative from New York, and as the 31st governor of New York. The son of a Congregational minister, Morton was born in Vermont and educated in Vermont and Massachusetts. He trained for a business career by clerking in stores and working in mercantile establishments in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. After rel...

Stevenson, Adlai E. (Adlai Ewing), 1835-1914

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6k17tqf (person)

Adlai Ewing Stevenson (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) served as the 23rd vice president of the United States from 1893 to 1897. Previously, he served as a representative from Illinois in the late 1870s and early 1880s. After his subsequent appointment as assistant postmaster general of the United States during Grover Cleveland's first administration (1885–89), he fired many Republican postal workers and replaced them with Southern Democrats. This earned him the enmity of the Republican-contro...

Fairbanks, Charles W. (Charles Warren), 1852-1918

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6nt1jcx (person)

Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was an American politician who served as a senator from Indiana from 1897 to 1905 and the 26th vice president of the United States from 1905 to 1909. He was also the Republican vice presidential nominee in the 1916 presidential election. Born near Unionville Center, Ohio, Fairbanks moved to Indianapolis after graduating from Ohio Wesleyan University. He became an attorney and railroad financier, working under railroad magnate Jay Gould. F...

Sherman, J. S. (James Schoolcraft), 1855-1912

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6j20snh (person)

James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was an American politician who was a United States representative from New York from 1887 to 1891 and 1893 to 1909, and the 27th vice president of the United States from 1909 until his death. He was a member of the interrelated Baldwin, Hoar, and Sherman families, prominent lawyers and politicians of New England and New York. Although not a high-powered administrator, he made a natural congressional committee chairman, and his ge...

Marshall, Thomas R. (Thomas Riley), 1854-1925

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62v2h1g (person)

Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the 28th vice president of the United States from 1913 to 1921 under President Woodrow Wilson. A prominent lawyer in Indiana, he became an active and well known member of the Democratic Party by stumping across the state for other candidates and organizing party rallies that later helped him win election as the 27th governor of Indiana. In office, he proposed controversial changes to the Constitution o...

Dawes, Charles Gates, 1865-1951

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w68h994d (person)

Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker, general, diplomat, composer, and Republican politician who was the 30th vice president of the United States from 1925 to 1929. For his work on the Dawes Plan for World War I reparations, he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1925. Born in Marietta, Ohio, Dawes attended Cincinnati Law School before beginning a legal career in Lincoln, Nebraska. After serving as a gas plant executive, he managed William M...

Hobart, Garret A. (Garret Augustus), 1844-1899

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6qk86q4 (person)

Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844 – November 21, 1899) was an American politician who served as the 24th vice president of the United States, from 1897 until his death. He was the sixth American vice president to die in office. Prior to serving as vice president, Hobart was an influential New Jersey politician and political operative. Hobart was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, on the Jersey Shore, and grew up in nearby Marlboro. After attending Rutgers College, Hobart read law with promin...

Casper College

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mm73b0 (corporateBody)

Casper College is a public community college in Casper, Wyoming. It is one of the largest and most comprehensive community colleges in the region. Established in 1945 as Wyoming's first junior college and initially located on the third floor of Natrona County High School, Casper College moved to its current site 10 years later. Currently the campus consists of 28 buildings on more than 200 acres. The grounds are distinctive, with terraces that surround the modern buildings. It currently enrolls ...

Clinton, DeWitt, 1769-1828

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6zx29c7 (person)

DeWitt Clinton (March 2, 1769 – February 11, 1828) was an American politician and naturalist who served as a United States Senator, Mayor of New York City and sixth Governor of New York. In this last capacity, he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal. Clinton was a major candidate for the American presidency in the election of 1812, challenging incumbent James Madison. A nephew of long-time New York Governor George Clinton, DeWitt Clinton served as his uncle's secreta...

Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth, 1746-1825

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62p5rp9 (person)

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (February 25, 1746 – August 16, 1825) was an early American statesman of South Carolina, Revolutionary War veteran, and delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He was twice nominated by the Federalist Party as its presidential candidate in 1804 and 1808, losing both elections. Pinckney was born into a powerful family of aristocratic planters. He practiced law for several years and was elected to the colonial legislature. A supporter of independence from Great Br...

Floyd, John, 1783-1837

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6n306r3 (person)

John Floyd (April 24, 1783 – August 17, 1837) was a Virginia politician and soldier. He represented Virginia in the United States House of Representatives and later served as the 25th Governor of Virginia. During his career in the House of Representatives, Floyd was an advocate of settling the Oregon Country, unsuccessfully arguing on its behalf from 1820 until he left Congress in 1829; the area did not become a territory of the United States until 1848. In 1832, Floyd received votes for t...

White, Hugh Lawson, 1773-1840

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6zp45v6 (person)

Hugh Lawson White (October 30, 1773 – April 10, 1840) was a prominent American politician during the first third of the 19th century. After filling in several posts particularly in Tennessee's judiciary and state legislature since 1801, thereunder as a Tennessee Supreme Court justice, he was chosen to succeed former presidential candidate Andrew Jackson in the United States Senate in 1825 and became a member of the new Democratic Party, supporting Jackson's policies and his future presidential a...

Scott, Winfield, 1786-1866

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Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was an American military commander and political candidate. He served as a general in the United States Army from 1814 to 1861, taking part in the War of 1812, the Mexican–American War, the early stages of the American Civil War, and various conflicts with Native Americans. Scott was the Whig Party's presidential nominee in the 1852 presidential election, but was defeated by Democrat Franklin Pierce. He was known as Old Fuss and Feathers for his insi...

Webster, Daniel, 1782-1852

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6s865sc (person)

Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore. As one of the most prominent American lawyers of the 19th century, he argued over 200 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court between 1814 and his death in 1852. During his life, he was a member of the Federalist Party, the Nati...

Crawford, William Harris, 1772-1834

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6c06wf3 (person)

William Harris Crawford (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an American politician and judge during the early 19th century. He served as United States Secretary of War and United States Secretary of the Treasury before running for president in the 1824 election. Born in Virginia, Crawford moved to Georgia at a young age. After studying law, Crawford won election to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1803. He aligned with the Democratic-Republican Party and U.S. Senator James Jac...

Douglas, Stephen A. (Stephen Arnold), 1813-1861

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6v22v62 (person)

Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861) was an American politician and lawyer from Illinois. He was one of two Democratic Party nominees for president in the 1860 presidential election, which was won by Abraham Lincoln. Douglas had previously defeated Lincoln in the 1858 United States Senate election in Illinois, known for the Lincoln–Douglas debates. During the 1850s, Douglas was one of the foremost advocates of popular sovereignty, which held that each territory should be allowe...

Seymour, Horatio, 1810-1886

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66793n8 (person)

Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 – February 12, 1886) was an American politician. He served as Governor of New York from 1853 to 1854 and from 1863 to 1864. He was the Democratic Party nominee for president in the 1868 presidential election. Born in Pompey, New York, Seymour was admitted to the New York bar in 1832 but primarily focused on managing his family's business interests. After serving as a military secretary to Governor William L. Marcy, Seymour won election to the New York State Assem...

Tilden, Samuel J. (Samuel Jones), 1814-1886

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Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 – August 4, 1886) was the 25th Governor of New York and the Democratic candidate for president in the disputed election of 1876. Tilden is the only individual to win an outright majority of the popular vote in a United States presidential election but lose the election. Tilden was born into a wealthy family in New Lebanon, New York. Attracted to politics at a young age, he became a protégé of Martin Van Buren, the eighth President of the United States. Af...

Hancock, Winfield Scott, 1824-1886

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6cs6hsz (person)

Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a United States Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. He served with distinction in the Army for four decades, including service in the Mexican–American War and as a Union general in the American Civil War. Known to his Army colleagues as "Hancock the Superb", he was noted in particular for his personal leadership at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. His military service continued afte...

Greeley, Horace, 1811-1872

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Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American newspaper editor and publisher who was the founder and editor of the New-York Tribune, among the great newspapers of its time. Long active in politics, he served briefly as a congressman from New York, and was the unsuccessful candidate of the new Liberal Republican party in the 1872 presidential election against incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant, who won by a landslide. Greeley was born to a poor family in Amherst, New ...

Weaver, James B. (James Baird), 1833-1912

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6747fds (person)

James Baird Weaver (June 12, 1833 – February 6, 1912) was a member of the United States House of Representatives and two-time candidate for President of the United States. Born in Ohio, he moved to Iowa as a boy when his family claimed a homestead on the frontier. He became politically active as a young man and was an advocate for farmers and laborers. He joined and quit several political parties in the furtherance of the progressive causes in which he believed. After serving in the Union Army i...

Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6tv5fdj (person)

Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (August 10, 1858 – February 27, 1964) was an American author, educator, sociologist, speaker, Black Liberation activist, and one of the most prominent African-American scholars in United States history. Born into slavery in Raleigh, North Carolina in 1858, Cooper followed the path of many African Americans as she grasped hold of opportunities for an education through the Freedmen’s Bureau after emancipation. Cooper worked her way through St. Augustine’s Normal School...

Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6zm6648 (person)

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American orator and politician from Nebraska. Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, running three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1896, 1900, and 1908 elections. He also served in the United States House of Representatives and as the United States Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson. Just before his death, he gained national attention for attacking the te...

Parker, Alton B. (Alton Brooks), 1852-1926

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6xw4rxw (person)

Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American judge, best known as the Democrat who lost the presidential election of 1904 to incumbent Theodore Roosevelt in a landslide. A native of upstate New York, Parker practiced law in Kingston, New York, before being appointed to the New York Supreme Court and elected to the New York Court of Appeals; he served as Chief Judge of the latter from 1898 to 1904, when he resigned to run for president. In 1904, he defeated liberal publish...

Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60d5k54 (person)

Eugene Victor "Gene" Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American socialist, political activist, trade unionist, one of the founding members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and five times the candidate of the Socialist Party of America for President of the United States. Through his presidential candidacies as well as his work with labor movements, Debs eventually became one of the best-known socialists living in the United States. Early in his political career, Debs...

Hughes, Charles Evans, 1862-1948

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6bq0s7t (person)

Charles Evans Hughes Sr. (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was an American statesman, Republican Party politician, and the 11th Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. He was also the 36th Governor of New York, the Republican nominee in the 1916 presidential election, and the 44th United States Secretary of State. Born to a Welsh immigrant preacher and his wife in Glens Falls, New York, Hughes pursued a legal career in New York City. After working in private practice for several ye...

Remond, Sarah Parker, 1826-1894

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Sarah Parker Remond (June 6, 1826 – December 13, 1894) was born free in Massachusetts and became known as a lecturer, abolitionist, and agent of the American Anti-Slavery Society. An international activist for human rights and women's suffrage, she made her first speech against slavery when she was 16 years old. As a young woman, Remond delivered speeches throughout the northeast United States against slavery. One of her brothers, Charles Lenox Remond, became known as an orator and sometimes the...

Terrell, Phyllis, 1898-1989

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6096vrd (person)

Phyllis Terrell Langston (April 2, 1898 - August 1989) was a suffragist and civil rights activist. She worked alongside her mother, Mary Church Terrell, in the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs and the White House pickets during demonstrations made by the National Woman's Party. Phyllis Terrell was born on April 2, 1898 in Washington, DC to Mary Church Terrell, an activist and civic leader, and Robert H. Terrell, the first Black municipal court judge in D.C., and was appointed by ...

Washington, Margaret James Murray, 1865-1925

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6vj6c9z (person)

Margaret Murray Washington (March 9, 1865 - June 4, 1925) was the principal of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, which later became Tuskegee University. She was the third wife of Booker T. Washington. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1972. Margaret Murray was born on March 9 in Macon, Mississippi, in the early 1860s. Her birth year is unknown; her tombstone says she was born in 1865, but the 1870 census lists her birth year as 1861. She was one of ten children...