Druckman, Jacob

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1928-06-26
Death 1996-05-24
Americans
English, Hebrew

Biographical notes:

The Jacob Druckman Collection documents the life and career of Jacob Druckman (1928-1996), a Pulitzer-prize winning composer, educator, and organizer of the New York Philharmonic's Horizons series of new music concerts. The collection, assembled by Druckman over the course of his lifetime, with additional material inserted posthumously by his family, includes musical scores, correspondence, clippings, programs, and iconography; the collection's sound recordings are housed in the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archive of Recorded Sound and have been cataloged as a separate component. The New York Public Library acquired the Jacob Druckman Collection in December 1999.

From the guide to the Jacob Druckman papers, 1928-1999, (The New York Public Library. Music Division.)

Composer.

From the description of Autograph card signed, dated : [n.p.], 1984 Nov. 26. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270911564

American composer.

From the description of "Windows." autograph manuscript, 1984 Nov. 26. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270919806

Jacob Druckman (1928-1996) was one of the most prominent of contemporary American composers.

Born in Philadelphia, he enrolled in the Juilliard School in 1949, studying composition with Bernard Wagenaar, Vincent Persichetti, and Peter Mennin. In 1949 and 1950 he studied with Aaron Copland at Tanglewood; later, he continued his studies at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris (1954-55).

Druckman produced a substantial list of works embracing orchestral, chamber, and vocal media, and did considerable work with electronic music. In 1972, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Windows, his first work for large orchestra. Among his other numerous grants and awards were a Fulbright Grant in 1954, a Thorne Foundation award in 1972, Guggenheim Grants in 1957 and 1968, and the Publication Award from the Society for the Publication of American Music in 1967. Organizations that commissioned his music included Radio France (Shog, 1991); the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Brangle, 1989); the New York Philharmonic (Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, 1978; Aureole, 1979); the Philadelphia Orchestra (Counterpoise, 1994); the Baltimore Symphony (Prism, 1980); the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra (Mirage, 1976); the Juilliard Quartet (String Quartet No. 2, 1966); the Koussevitzky Foundation in the Library of Congress (Windows, 1972); IRCAM (Animus IV, 1977); and numerous others. He also composed for theater, films, and dance.

Druckman taught at the Juilliard School, Bard College, and Tanglewood; in addition he was director of the Electronic Music Studio and Professor of Composition at Brooklyn College. He was also associated with the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center in New York City. In the spring of 1982, he was Resident-In-Music at the American Academy in Rome; in April of that year, he was appointed composer-in-residence with the New York Philharmonic, where he served two two-year terms and was Artistic Director of the HORIZONS music festival. In the last years of his life, Druckman was Professor of Composition at the School of Music at Yale University.

From the description of Jacob Druckman collection of noncommercial sound recordings [sound recording]. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122625106

The Jacob Druckman Collection documents the life and career of Jacob Druckman (1928-1996), a Pulitzer-prize winning composer, educator, and organizer of the New York Philharmonic's Horizons series of new music concerts.

The collection, assembled by Druckman over the course of his lifetime, with additional material inserted posthumously by his family, includes musical scores, correspondence, clippings, programs, and iconography; the collection's sound recordings are housed in the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archive of Recorded Sound and have been cataloged as a separate component. The New York Public Library acquired the Jacob Druckman Collection in December 1999.

From the description of Jacob Druckman papers, 1928-1999. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122455154

Jacob Druckman (1928-1996) was one of the most prominent of contemporary American composers. Born in Philadelphia, he enrolled in the Juilliard School in 1949, studying composition with Bernard Wagenaar, Vincent Persichetti, and Peter Mennin . In 1949 and 1950 he studied with Aaron Copland at Tanglewood; later, he continued his studies at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris (1954-55).

Druckman produced a substantial list of works embracing orchestral, chamber, and vocal media, and did considerable work with electronic music. In 1972, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Windows, his first work for large orchestra. Among his other numerous grants and awards were a Fulbright Grant in 1954, a Thorne Foundation award in 1972, Guggenheim Grants in 1957 and 1968, and the Publication Award from the Society for the Publication of American Music in 1967. Organizations that commissioned his music included Radio France ( Shog, 1991); the Chicago Symphony Orchestra ( Brangle, 1989); the New York Philharmonic ( Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, 1978; Aureole, 1979); the Philadelphia Orchestra ( Counterpoise, 1994); the Baltimore Symphony ( Prism, 1980); the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra ( Mirage, 1976); the Juilliard Quartet ( String Quartet No. 2, 1966); the Koussevitzky Foundation in the Library of Congress ( Windows, 1972); IRCAM ( Animus IV, 1977); and numerous others. He also composed for theater, films, and dance.

Druckman taught at the Juilliard School, Bard College, and Tanglewood ; in addition he was director of the Electronic Music Studio and Professor of Composition at Brooklyn College . He was also associated with the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center in New York City. In the spring of 1982, he was Resident-In-Music at the American Academy in Rome ; in April of that year, he was appointed composer-in-residence with the New York Philharmonic, where he served two two-year terms and was Artistic Director of the HORIZONS music festival. In the last years of his life, Druckman was Professor of Composition at the School of Music at Yale University .

From the guide to the Jacob Druckman collection of noncommercial sound recordings [sound recording], (The New York Public Library. Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound.)

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6st8438
Ark ID:
w6st8438
SNAC ID:
63744550

Subjects:

  • Sacred songs (High voice) with organ
  • Choruses, Sacred (Mixed voices, 4 parts) with organ
  • Organ and electronic music
  • Music--Manuscripts--Facsimiles
  • Organ music
  • Synagogue music--Sabbath services
  • Clarinet and electronic music--Scores
  • Musical sketches
  • Psalms (Music)
  • Sacred songs (Medium voice) with instrumental ensemble--Scores
  • Jews--Music
  • Electronic music
  • Vocal music
  • Synagogue music
  • Instrumental music
  • Orchestral music
  • Psalms (Music)--93rd Psalm

Occupations:

  • Composers--United States
  • Composers

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)