Menuhin, Yehudi, 1916-1999

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1916-04-22
Death 1999-03-12
Britons
English

Biographical notes:

An American violinist, Yehudi Menuhin was engaged in 1947 by Two Continent Pictures to appear and play in a projected moving picture named Delirium and an associated short movie; and later for a series of short films. He suggested changes in the script and performed the Mendelssohn Concerto for Delirium, but the picture apparently was not completed, nor were the short films although 22 reels were recorded and photographed.

From the description of Letters and other papers relating to Menuhin's involvement with the film industry, 1947 Sept. 11-1948 Sept 2. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 86164282

From the guide to the Letters and other papers relating to Menuhin's involvement with the film industry, 1947 Sept. 11-1948 Sept 2, (The New York Public Library. Music Division.)

Violinist and conductor.

From the description of Interview conducted by Oliver Daniel, Jan. 16, 1978 [sound recording]. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 155861414

American violinist and conductor.

From the description of Signature, dated : London, 10 May 1938, 1938, May 10. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270954055

Yehudi Menuhin, an American violinist, conductor, and teacher of Russian descent, was born in New York on April 22, 1916. His early violin studies were with Sigmund Anker and Louis Persinger, and he completed his training with Adolf Busch and George Enescu. As a child prodigy, he gave his earliest professional concerts in San Francisco in 1924 and followed those performances with highly successful debut concerts in New York, Paris, Berlin and London. As a prolific recording artist, Menuhin became known for his performances of Edward Elgar's Violin Concerto, which he recorded in 1932 with the composer conducting. His interest in new music produced more than 40 commissions from such noted composers as Béla Bartók (Sonata for Solo Violin) and William Walton (Sonata for Violin and Piano). Menuhin also championed lesser known works of the past such as Mendelssohn's early Concerto in D Minor and Robert Schumann's Violin Concerto. During the Second World War Menuhin gave more than 500 concerts, and in 1945 he was the first Jewish musical artist to perform in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler. In the late 1940s Menuhin became more active as a conductor and teacher. In 1959 he founded the Bath Festival Orchestra, and in 1963 he founded the Menuhin Music School, both in the U.K. As a teacher, he also published books on violin playing and wrote an autobiography. Menuhin remained an active performer throughout his life and died in Berlin on March 12, 1999 during a concert tour of Germany.

From the description of Yehudi Menuhin Collection. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694344872

Epithet: violinist

Title: Baron Menuhin of Stoke d'Abernon

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000206.0x00039f

Biographical/Historical note

Yehudi Menuhin, an American violinist, conductor, and teacher of Russian descent, was born in New York on April 22, 1916. His early violin studies were with Sigmund Anker and Louis Persinger, and he completed his training with Adolf Busch and George Enescu. As a child prodigy, he gave his earliest professional concerts in San Francisco in 1924 and followed those performances with highly successful debut concerts in New York, Paris, Berlin and London. As a prolific recording artist, Menuhin became known for his performances of Edward Elgar's Violin Concerto, which he recorded in 1932 with the composer conducting. His interest in new music produced more than 40 commissions from such noted composers as Béla Bartók ( Sonata for Solo Violin ) and William Walton ( Sonata for Violin and Piano ). Menuhin also championed lesser known works of the past such as Mendelssohn's early Concerto in D Minor and Robert Schumann's Violin Concerto . During the Second World War Menuhin gave more than 500 concerts, and in 1945 he was the first Jewish musical artist to perform in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler. In the late 1940s Menuhin became more active as a conductor and teacher. In 1959 he founded the Bath Festival Orchestra, and in 1963 he founded the Menuhin Music School, both in the U.K. As a teacher, he also published books on violin playing and wrote an autobiography. Menuhin remained an active performer throughout his life and died in Berlin on March 12, 1999 during a concert tour of Germany.

From the guide to the Yehudi Menuhin Collection, 1938-1950, (Archive of Recorded Sound, Stanford University Libraries)

Born on January 10, 1910 in Lyon, the French conductor and composer, Jean Martinon entered the Lyon and Paris conservatoires to study the violin. At Lyon, his teacher was Maurice Foundray and at the Paris Conservatory, he studied violin technique with Jules Boucherit. While at the Paris conservatory, Martinon took composition with Albert Roussel and Vincent d’Indy. After completing the composition courses, he studied conducting with Charles Munch and Désormière. He graduated from the Paris Conservatory in 1928, winning a premier prix.

Martinon’s familiarity with conducting started in France, followed by various appointments in Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. In 1946, he embarked on a conducting career directing the Concerts du Conservatoire in Paris and the Bordeaux Symphony. The successful debut with the LPO led to his appointment as associate conductor of the orchestra in 1947. From 1947-1950 Martinon directed the Radio Eireann orchestra, Dublin and in 1951, he returned to Paris to conduct the Concerts Lamoureux until 1957. From 1957-1959, Martinon conducted the Israel Philharmonic. His appointment as the next conductor of the Düsseldorf Symphony occurred in 1959. Martinon was in Düsseldorf until 1963 when the Chicago Symphony Orchestra selected him as their music director, a position he held until 1968. During that same year, he returned to France to direct the French National Radio Orchestra and served as the principal conductor of the Hague Residentie–Orkest from 1974 until shortly before his death in 1976.

Martinon’s extensive experience as a composer led to his approach to conducting. The Symphoniette pour orchestre á cordes, piano, harpe et timbales, op. 16, from 1935, is one of three first attempts at composition. After enlisting in the war, Martinon’s imprisonment in a German camp, Stalag IX A, resulted in several new compositions, Psaume 136, le Chant des Captifs, Musique d’Exil, Sonatina No.3, Sonatina No. 4 for wind instruments, and various choral works. In 1946, the city of Paris awarded a prize to his composition le Chant des Captifs. After the war, other notable compositions include Symphonie no. 3 (Irlandaise), the Concerto no. 2 pour violin et orchestre, op. 5, dedicated to Szeryng, and the Concerto pour cello et orchestre, op. 52, composed for Pierre Fournier. For the stage Martinon composed two works, the ballet Ambohimanga ou la Cité Bleue and in 1949 the opera Hécube with a libretto by Serge Moreux. Symphony no.4 Altitudes was the outcome of a commission from the Chicago Symphony to commemorate its 75th anniversary.

Martinon had recently taken on a position at the Paris Conservatory to teach conducting when he died from a serious illness on March 1, 1976.

From the guide to the Jean Martinon papers, 1923-1994, (Music Library)

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Subjects:

  • Violin and piano music
  • Violin with orchestra
  • Concertos (Violin)
  • Motion pictures and music
  • Violinists--United States
  • Sonatas (Violin and piano)
  • Violin music
  • Violinists

Occupations:

  • Violinists
  • Performer
  • Conductor
  • Collector

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)