Carter G. Woodson collection of Negro papers and related documents, 1803-1936 (inclusive), 1830-1927 (bulk), [microform].

ArchivalResource

Carter G. Woodson collection of Negro papers and related documents, 1803-1936 (inclusive), 1830-1927 (bulk), [microform].

Carter G. Woodson collection of Negro papers and related documents, 1803-1936 (inclusive), 1830-1927 (bulk), [microform].

The collection includes papers of Whitefield McKinlay, Washington, D.C. realtor and collector of the Port of Washington; Benjamin Tucker Tanner, Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church; and John T. Clark, officer of the Pittsburgh Urban League; as well as some early papers of Carter G. Woodson, author, editor, and historian. The papers consist principally of correpondence on a variety of subjects, including black history, the Journal of Negro History, appointments of blacks to Federal office, race relations, racial discrimination, employment opportunities, state and national politics, and business matters. Addresses, diaries, clippings, and legal documents complete the collection.

10 reels.

eng, Latn

Related Entities

There are 23 Entities related to this resource.

Greener, Richard Theodore, 1844-1922

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6bm23qj (person)

Richard Theodore Greener (January 30, 1844 – May 2, 1922) was the first African American graduate of Harvard College and went on to become the dean of the Howard University School of Law. Richard Greener was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1844 and moved with his mother to Boston when he was approximately nine years old. He quit school in his mid-teens to earn money for his family, but one of his employers, Franklin B. Sanborn, helped him to enroll in preparatory school (Oberlin Academ...

Smalls, Robert, 1839-1915

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jx955t (person)

Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839 – February 23, 1915) was an American politician, publisher, businessman, and naval pilot. Born into slavery in Beaufort, South Carolina, he freed himself, his crew, and their families during the American Civil War by commandeering a Confederate transport ship, CSS Planter, in Charleston harbor, on May 13, 1862, and sailing it from Confederate-controlled waters of the harbor to the U.S. blockade that surrounded it. He then piloted the ship to the Union-controlled encl...

Woodson, Carter Godwin, 1875-1950

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6h23s6h (person)

Carter Godwin Woodson, educator and historian, was considered the Father of Black History. He was born December 19, 1875, New Canton, Virginia. He was an African-American historian, author, and journalist who, in 1915, founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. In 1926 he pioneered the concept of a "Negro History Week," which was later expanded into Black History Month. Woodson died at his home in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C., on April 3, 1950....

Carver, George Washington, 1864?-1943

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67q9nmk (person)

Agricultural scientist, teacher, humanitarian, artist, and Iowa State alumnus (1894, 1896). George Washington Carver was born ca. 1864, the son of slaves on the Moses Carver plantation near Diamond Grove, Missouri. He lost his father in infancy, and at the age of 6 months was stolen along with his mother by raiders, but was later found and traded back to his owner for a $300 race horse. He enrolled in Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa in 1890 studying music and art. Etta Budd, his art instructor ...

Crum, William D.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6b8825s (person)

Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6k35s2f (person)

Henry Cabot Lodge (1850-1924) was born into a prominent Boston family in 1850. Through his mother’s family, the Cabots, Lodge traced his lineage back to the 17th century, with one great-grandfather a leading Federalist during the Revolutionary period. Growing up in both an intellectual and privileged household, "Cabot" took naturally to academic subjects, particularly history and literature. Beyond his early devotion to scholarly pursuits, Lodge also enjoyed numerous sports and the great outdoor...

Starr, Frederick, 1826-1867

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6z89jt2 (person)

Fleetwood, Christian Abraham, 1840-1914

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gm8b84 (person)

Fleetwood was born in Baltimore on July 21, 1840, the son of Charles and Anna Maria Fleetwood, both were free persons of color. He received his early education in the home of a wealthy sugar merchant and chairman of Baltimore's chamber of commerce, John C. Brunes, and his wife. The latter treated Fleetwood like her son and taught him to read and write. He continued his education at the Maryland State Colonization Society, went briefly to Liberia and Sierra Leone, and graduated in 1860 from Ashmu...

Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60h488d (person)

Roosevelt, 26th U.S. president, served 1901-1909. From the description of DS, 1904 March 1. : Washington, D.C. Homestead Certificate. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 15210791 26th president of the United States, 1901-1909. From the description of Theodore Roosevelt letters, 1917, 1918. (Buffalo History Museum). WorldCat record id: 213408920 Roosevelt was then Governor of New York. Chapman was one of the founders of the New York St...

Rosenwald, Julius, 1862-1932

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6621p92 (person)

Businessman and philanthropist. Born, Springfield, IL, 1862. President, Rosenwald and Weil, 1885-1906. Vice-president and treasurer, Sears, Roebuck and Company, 1910-1925; president and chairman of the board, 1925-1932. Founder, Julius Rosenwald Fund, 1917. Founder, Museum of Science and Industry, 1929. Trustee, University of Chicago, Tuskegee Institute, Rockefeller Foundation, Hull House, Art Institute of Chicago, and the Baron de Hirsch Fund. From the description of Papers, 1905-19...

Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6h814sk (person)

Booker T. Washington was an African American educator and public figure. Born a slave on a small farm in Virginia, he worked his way through the Hampton Institute and became an instructor there. He was the first principal of the Tuskegee Institute, and under his management it became a successful center for practical education. A forceful and charismatic personality, he became a national figure through his books and lectures. Although his conservative views concerned many critics, he became the m...

Stone, Melville E., 1875-

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62n9459 (person)

Melville Edwin Stone (1875-1918) earned his Harvard AB 1897. He was editor of the Crimson while an undergraduate. He became a writer and publisher. From the description of Daily themes, 1894-1896. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 77066434 ...

Bruce, John Edward

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6k950kq (person)

"Born a slave in Piscataway, Maryland, John Edward Bruce (1856-1924) went on to write for, edit, or found an astonishing number of periodicals ... After winning freedom with his mother in 1860, Bruce received sporadic schooling in Connecticut and Washington, D.C., including several months at Howard University. In 1879 he founded his first paper, the Argus. The coming years would see him found four other papers, edit two more papers and two magazines, and write as a correspondent for over twenty ...

McCormick, Medill, 1877-1925

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6dr2v7c (person)

Fortune, Timothy Thomas, 1856-1928

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w65h96nz (person)

T. Thomas Fortune was the foremost African-American journalist of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He served as an editor, publisher, writer, orator and civil rights leader, using his position at a series of black newspapers in New York City as the leading spokesman and defender of the rights of African Americans in both the South and the North. Fortune's journalism career began in Florida, he moved to New York in 1881, and founded the "New York Freeman...

McKinlay, Whitefield, 1857-1941

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6sb6cxb (person)

Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jf5kqm (person)

Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in 1818. He barely knew his mother, who lived on a different plantation and died when he was a young child and never discovered the identity of his father. When he turned eight years old, his slaveowner hired him out to work as a body servant in Baltimore. At an early age, Frederick realized there was a connection between literacy and freedom. Not allowed to attend school, he taught himself to read and wr...

Clark, John T., 1883-1949

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6xw79sv (person)

Scott, Emmett J. (Emmett Jay), 1873-1957

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6v41hxn (person)

Secretary to Booker T. Washington and of Tuskegee Normal School Board of Trustees (1897-1919); special assistant, U.S. Secretary of War (1917-1919); secretary-treasurer and secretary, Howard University and its Board of Trustees (1919-1938); assistant publicity directory, Republican National Committee and advisor to the chairman of its Negro Affairs Committee (1939-1942); director, employment and personnel relations, Shipyard No. 4, Sun Shipbuilding Co. in Pennsylvania (1942-1945); secretary, Sou...

Lynch, John Roy, 1847-1939

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60k311p (person)

John Roy Lynch (September 10, 1847 – November 2, 1939) was a black Republican politician, writer, attorney and military officer. Born into slavery in Louisiana, he became free in 1863 under the Emancipation Proclamation. His father was an Irish immigrant and his parents had a common-law marriage. After serving for several years in the state legislature, in 1873 Lynch was elected as the first African-American Speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives; he was the first black man (conside...

Young, Charles M. (Charles Morton), 1945-

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6st8qpx (person)

Charles Young was a clock maker working in Chambersburg, Penn. From the description of Brass dial bracket clock, ca. 1770. (Winterthur Library). WorldCat record id: 668258799 ...

Tanner, Benj. T. (Benjamin Tucker), 1835-1923

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6pp1xh6 (person)

Revels, Hiram Rhodes, c. 1827-1901

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p27rz1 (person)

Hiram Rhodes Revels (September 27, 1827 – January 16, 1901) was a Republican U.S. Senator, minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and a college administrator. Born free in North Carolina, he later lived and worked in Ohio, where he voted before the Civil War. He became the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress when he was appointed to the United States Senate as a Republican to represent Mississippi in 1870 and 1871 during the Reconstruction era. During the America...