Hosmer, Harriet Goodhue, 1830-1908

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1830-10-09
Death 1908-02-21
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Sculptor and inventor, Hosmer was a native of Watertown, Mass., studied anatomy, and spent much of her life in Rome, where she was at first the pupil of the English sculptor, John Gibson. Her works were exhibited and purchased in England and the United States. For further information, see Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories, edited by Cornelia Crow Carr (1912); Notable American Women (1971); and Hosmeriana: A Guide to Works by and about Harriet G. Hosmer, by Joseph L. Curran (1975).

From the description of Papers, 1852-1972 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122521589

From the guide to the Papers, 1852-1972, (Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute)

Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908) was a sculptor, originally of Watertown, Mass., who spent most of her time in Rome. Her most famous work was the 1862 statue of Zenobia.

From the description of Harriet Hosmer letter and photograph, ca. 1860s and n.d. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 38235656

Sculptor; Watertown, Massachusetts; b. 1830 d. 1908.

From the description of Harriet Goodhue Hosmer letters, [ca. 1870-1900]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 86118559

Sculptor and inventor, Hosmer (1830-1908) was a native of Watertown, Mass., studied anatomy, and spent much of her life in Rome, where she was at first the pupil of the English sculptor, John Gibson. Her works were exhibited and purchased in England and the United States. Civic leader, state senator, and business tycoon, Wayman Crow was the founder of Washington University and later of its art museum. Wayman Crow married Isabella B. Conn (1814-1892); among their children was Cornelia (Crow) Carr. In the years 1847-1851 Cornelia Crow (1833-1922) attended Elizabeth Sedgwick's seminary in Lenox, Massachusetts. Here she met and befriended Harriet Goodhue Hosmer. Wayman Crow became Hosmer's first benefactor and life-long patron, managing her financial matters until his death. In 1912, four years after Hosmer's death, Cornelia (Crow) Carr published a biography of the sculptor entitled, Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories.

From the description of Additional papers, 1848-1915 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 542727247

American sculptor.

From the description of Harriet Goodhue Hosmer letter to Mrs. Appleton [manuscript], no date. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 715377130

Sculptor and inventor, Hosmer was a native of Watertown, Mass., studied anatomy, and spent much of her life in Rome, where she was at first the pupil of the English sculptor John Gibson. Her works were exhibited and purchased in England and the United States. For further information, see Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories, edited by Cornelia Crow Carr (1912); Notable American Women (1971); and Hosmeriana: A Guide to Works by and about Harriet G. Hosmer, by Joseph L. Curran (1975). Lydia Maria Child was an abolitionist, reformer, and author. For biographical information, see Notable American Women (1971).

From the description of Letters, 1855-1865 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232009070

Sculptor and inventor, Hosmer (1830-1908) was a native of Watertown, Mass., studied anatomy, and spent much of her life in Rome, where she was at first the pupil of the English sculptor, John Gibson. Her works were exhibited and purchased in England and the United States. For further information, see Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories, edited by Cornelia Crow Carr (1912); Notable American Women (1971); and Hosmeriana: A Guide to Works by and about Harriet G. Hosmer, by Joseph L. Curran (1975).

From the description of Papers, 1834-1959 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232006663

Sculptor Harriet G. Hosmer (1830-1908) was born the second child of Hiram and Sarah Hosmer of Watertown, MA. Upon the death of her mother and siblings, Harriet became quite a tomboy in her father's care. She studied art in Boston under Stevenson and also attended the Lenox School. After enrolling as a student of anatomy in an all-male medical school in Missouri, she moved to Rome in 1852 to become a student of English sculptor John Gibson. She remained in Europe for most of the remainder of her life, living in Rome and spending summers in England. Her Neo-Classical style of sculpture was noted in both the United States and Europe.

From the description of Letters, [ca. 1845-1908]. (Winterthur Library). WorldCat record id: 84666644

Sculptor and inventor, Hosmer (1830-1908) was a native of Watertown, Massachusetts, studied anatomy, and spent much of her life in Rome, where she was at first the pupil of the English sculptor, John Gibson. Her works were exhibited and purchased in England and the United States. For further information, see Harriet Hosmer, Letters and Memories, edited by Cornelia Crow Carr (1912); Notable American Women (1971); and Hosmeriana: A Guide to Works by and about Harriet G. Hosmer, by Joseph L. Curran (1975).

From the description of Letters, 1889-1897 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 548941318

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Subjects:

  • Women sculptors--United States
  • Short stories
  • Artists--United States
  • Women sculptors--Pictorial works
  • Arts
  • Women artists--United States
  • American
  • Letters
  • Sculptors
  • Art criticism
  • Women sculptors
  • Artists--Correspondence
  • Sculptors--United States
  • Women artists
  • Poetry--19th century
  • Voyages and travels
  • Art patronage
  • Spiritualism
  • Artists
  • Sculpture, American
  • Breast--Cancer
  • Sculpture
  • Caricatures and cartoons
  • Friendship
  • Drama--19th century

Occupations:

  • Artists
  • Sculptors
  • Actresses
  • Inventors
  • Art patrons

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • Rome (Italy) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Watertown (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Italy (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Florence (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • Italy (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)