Stevens, Wallace, 1879-1955

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1879-10-02
Death 1955-08-02
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Wallace Stevens was an American Modernist poet. He was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, educated at Harvard and then New York Law School, and spent most of his life working as a lawyer for the Hartford insurance company in Connecticut.

From the guide to the Wallace Stevens collection, 1921-1966, (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

Wallace Stevens was an American essayist, playwright, and poet.

From the description of Wallace Stevens collection of papers, 1935-1964. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122485074

From the guide to the Wallace Stevens collection of papers, 1935-1964, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Wallace Stevens was an American poet.

From the description of Letters to Philip S. May, 1930-1943. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 78291488

From the guide to the Letters to Philip S. May, 1930-1943., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Wallace Stevens (1879-1955) was one of the foremost American poets of the first half of the 20th century. Born in Reading, Pennsylvania, Stevens retained an interest during his lifetime in his native Berks County, Pennsylvania. His wife, Elsie Viola (Moll) Stevens, came from Reading, and both Stevens and his wife devoted considerable time and energy (primarily in the 1940's) tracing their family ancestries. Though Stevens refused to consider his life a dichotomy, his poetic activities were accomplished while he was holding a full-time position as a legal advisor for the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company in Hartford, Connecticut, the firm for which he acted as Vice-President from 1934 until his death in 1955. Stevens ens began writing verse as a student at Harvard University and had a number of his verses published in the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard Monthly between 1898 and 1900. In 1908 and 1909 Stevens presented his future wife, Elsie Viola Moll, with two little notebooks of poems (A Book of Verses and The Little June Book) which gathered together short poems Stevens had been experimenting with since leaving Harvard. Between 1914 and 1923 Stevens submitted poems to a number of journals, including Poetry (edited by Harriet Monroe), The Dial and Others (edited by Alfred Kreymborg). In 1923 was published Stevens' first book of poems, Harmonium. With Harmonium began a lifelong association with the publishing firm Alfred A. Knopf Inc. Stevens did, however, offer the small fine press, the Cummington Press, three of his books: Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), Esthitique du Mal (1945) and Three Academic Pieces (1947). The Alcestis Press, under the direction of Ronald Lane Latimer, printed Ideas of Order (1935) and Owl's Clover (1936). Stevens was twice awarded the National Book Award: in 1950 for The Auroras of Autumn (1950) and in 1954 for Collected Poems (1954). He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1955.

From the description of Wallace Stevens Oral History Collection, 1975-1985 (bulk 1976-1978). (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 705616901

Wallace Stevens and Carl Zigrosser met through their mutual friend, Walter Pach. Stevens purchased prints at Keppel & Co. and the Weyhe Gallery from Zigrosser. Zigrosser interested Stevens in the journal that he edited, The Modern School, where Stevens published several poems.

From the description of Correspondence with Carl Zigrosser, 1917-1934. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 192002591

Stevens was an American poet.

From the description of Papers, 1917-1961. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612365551

From the guide to the Wallace Stevens papers, 1917-1961., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Poet Wallace Stevens was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, and studied at Harvard, where he indulged his literary leanings. Taking a law degree from New York Law School, he accepted a position with the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company, where he remained for the rest of his career, being named vice-president in 1934. He also wrote poetry, adored by other poets but largely ignored by the public, which exercised the imagination in new and exciting ways--precise yet abstract, philosophical yet whimsical. Gradually, his work became widely known, and he was recognized with two National Book Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Today, Stevens is acknowledged as one of the best and most influential poets of the twentieth century.

From the description of Wallace Stevens letters and clipping, 1937-1951. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 70247629

Epithet: poet

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000544.0x00009c

Wallace Stevens (1879-1955) was one of the foremost American poets of the first half of the 20th century. Born in Reading, Pennsylvania, Stevens retained an interest during his lifetime in his native Berks County, Pennsylvania. His wife, Elsie Viola (Moll) Stevens, came from Reading, and both Stevens and his wife devoted considerable time and energy (primarily in the 1940's) tracing their family ancestries. Though Stevens refused to consider his life a dichotomy, his poetic activities were accomplished while he was holding a full-time position as a legal advisor for the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company in Hartford, Connecticut, the firm for which he acted as Vice-President from 1934 until his death in 1955.

Stevens began writing verse as a student at Harvard University and had a number of his verses published in the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard Monthly between 1898 and 1900. In 1908 and 1909 Stevens presented his future wife, Elsie Viola Moll, with two little notebooks of poems ( A Book of Verses and The Little June Book) which gathered together short poems Stevens had been experimenting with since leaving Harvard. Between 1914 and 1923 Stevens submitted poems to a number of journals, including Poetry (edited by Harriet Monroe), The Dial and Others (edited by Alfred Kreymborg). In 1923 was published Stevens' first book of poems, Harmonium. With Harmonium began a lifelong association with the publishing firm Alfred A. Knopf Inc. Stevens did, however, offer the small fine press, the Cummington Press, three of his books: Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), Esthitique du Mal (1945) and Three Academic Pieces (1947). The Alcestis Press, under the direction of Ronald Lane Latimer, printed Ideas of Order (1935) and Owl's Clover (1936). Stevens was twice awarded the National Book Award: in 1950 for The Auroras of Autumn (1950) and in 1954 for Collected Poems (1954). He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1955.

From the description of Papers of Wallace Stevens, 1856-1975. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 261222617

Biographical Sketch

Wallace Stevens (1879-1955) was one of the foremost American poets of the first half of the 20th century. Born in Reading, Pennsylvania, Stevens retained an interest during his lifetime in his native Berks County, Pennsylvania. His wife, Elsie Viola (Moll) Stevens, came from Reading, and both Stevens and his wife devoted considerable time and energy (primarily in the 1940's) tracing their family ancestries.

Though Stevens refused to consider his life a dichotomy, his poetic activities were accomplished while he was holding a full-time position as a legal advisor for the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company in Hartford, Connecticut, the firm for which he acted as Vice-President from 1934 until his death in 1955.

Stevens began writing verse as a student at Harvard University and had a number of his verses published in the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard Monthly between 1898 and 1900. In 1908 and 1909 Stevens presented his future wife, Elsie Viola Moll, with two little notebooks of poems ( A Book of Verses and The Little June Book) which gathered together short poems Stevens had been experimenting with since leaving Harvard. Between 1914 and 1923 Stevens submitted poems to a number of journals, including Poetry (edited by Harriet Monroe), The Dial and Others (edited by Alfred Kreymborg). In 1923 was published Stevens' first book of poems, Harmonium. With Harmonium began a lifelong association with the publishing firm Alfred A. Knopf Inc. Stevens did, however, offer the small fine press, the Cummington Press, three of his books: Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), Esthitique du Mal (1945) and Three Academic Pieces (1947). The Alcestis Press, under the direction of Ronald Lane Latimer, printed Ideas of Order (1935) and Owl's Clover (1936).

Stevens was twice awarded the National Book Award: in 1950 for The Auroras of Autumn (1950) and in 1954 for Collected Poems (1954). He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1955.

From the guide to the Wallace Stevens Papers, 1856-1975, (The Huntington Library)

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Subjects:

  • American poetry--20th century
  • Translations
  • Calligraphy--Specimens
  • Poets, American--20th century--Archives
  • American literature--20th century
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Publishers and Publishing
  • Theaters--Stage-setting and scenery
  • Literature, Modern--20th century
  • Calligraphy
  • Poets, American--20th century--Correspondence

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Poets

Places:

  • Kentucky--Lexington (as recorded)
  • Reading (Pa.) (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Cummington (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)