Saroyan, William, 1908-1981

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1908-08-31
Death 1981-05-18
Americans
Armenian, English

Biographical notes:

Frances Ring was Editor at WESTWAYS in Los Angeles.

From the description of Letters (and manuscripts and photos) to Frances Ring, 1970-1980. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754863419

Goldie Weisberg was a fellow writer whose work Saroyan had discovered in a literary magzine. Saroyan initiated the correspondence, which focuses on their respective reading, writing, and work lives.

From the description of Correspondence with Goldie Weisberg, 1930-1938. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122510609

Gordon Brown was an editor at WESTWARD Magazine, a publication of Kaiser Steel Corporation in 1954. Saroyan wished to make changes in a manuscript ("A Christmas Psalm, " 1935) which they wanted to reprint, but because of a publishing deadline the magazine had to pass on it.

From the description of Letter to Gordon Brown, 1954 Oct. 29. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122541019

William Saroyan was an Armenian American dramatist and author.

From the description of William Saroyan papers, 1923-1994. (University of California, Berkeley). WorldCat record id: 740890008

William Saroyan, playwright.

From the description of The man with the heart in the Highlands : a play in One Act, Six scenes, 1937. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122531676

William Saroyan was born August 31, 1908, in Fresno, California, and died May 18, 1981, in Fresno, California. He became a prolific author of short stories, novels, and plays; perhaps his best known work is his novel, The Human Comedy . Biographical Source: Something About the Author, vols. 23, 24

From the guide to the William Saroyan Papers, 1974, (University of Minnesota Libraries Children's Literature Research Collections [clrc])

Coates was editor of THE FRONTIER, to which Saroyan was submitting stories. She was also a poet, short-story writer, and author of the book BLACK CHERRIES.

From the description of Letters to Grace Stone Coates, 1930-1938. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122552619

Moradian, who lived in Fresno, was a life-long friend of Saroyan.

From the description of Correspondence with Frank (Yep) Moradian, together with related photographs, recordings, and clippings, 1929-1999. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122397823

Steppenwolf is a Chicago-based international performing arts institution. Founded in 1976 by Terry Kinney, Jeff Perry, and Gary Sinise as an ensemble company of nine actors, Steppenwolf has grown to a company of 33 artists.

From the description of The time of your life : Steppenwolf Theatre Company production ephemera, 2002. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754864396

Lucy Saroyan was an actress, and the daughter of Pulitzer Prize winning author, William Saroyan, and Carol Marcus, who later married actor Walter Matthau.

From the description of Lucy letters : letters from William Saroyan to his daughter Lucy Saroyan : photocopies, January 17, 1953, to January 27, 1972 . (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754864598

American author.

From the description of Papers of William Saroyan [manuscript], 1957 August 21 to October 19. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647846062

From the description of Papers of William Saroyan [manuscript], 1938, n.d. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809835

From the description of Autograph letters signed (3) and typed letters signed (3) : San Francisco, Fresno and [n.p.], to Louis Sobol, 1938 Sept. 20-1941 Jan. 30 and [n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853300

From the description of Typed letter signed : Beverly Hills, Ca., to Sir Ronald Storrs, 1951 Apr. 22. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858122

From the description of Autograph message signed "Bill Saroyan" : [Pierpont Morgan Library, N.Y.], "Closing time," to Francis S. Mason, Jr., 1977 Oct. 26. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270634757

William Saroyan was born August 31, 1908, in Fresno, California, and died May 18, 1981, in Fresno, California. He became a prolific author of short stories, novels, and plays; perhaps his best known work is his novel, The Human Comedy. Biographical Source: Something About the Author, vols. 23, 24.

From the description of William Saroyan Papers 1974. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 432980357

Biography

Novelist, short-story writer, dramatist, and essayist, William Saroyan was born in Fresno, California in 1908. A high-school dropout, Saroyan was largely self-educated and decided at an early age to pursue a career as a writer, drawing on his experience as an Armenian-American growing up in California.

His first published works were sketches in The Overland Monthly in 1928, which inspired him to seek his fortune in New York City. In 1934 Story Magazine printed "The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze." The immediate public acclaim led to publication of the collection The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze and Other Stories (1934) by Random House. He followed this success with two more short story collections in 1936, Three Times Three and Inhale and Exhale.

Transforming one of these stories into his first dramatic production, My Heart's in the Highlands (1939), Saroyan then wrote The Time of Your Life (1939-40), for which he received both New York Drama Critics' Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The same year he released the story collection, My Name is Aram (1940), a Book of the Month Club selection.

In late 1941 Saroyan agreed to work for Louis B. Mayer in Hollywood. This resulted both in the Oscar-winning MGM film, The Human Comedy, (1943) as well as the popular novelized version of the original screenplay, published by Harcourt Brace simultaneously with the movie's opening.

Drafted into the army, Saroyan was stationed during part of World War II in London, where he wrote the controversial anti-war book, The Adventures of Wesley Jackson (1946). Through the 1950s he continued to produce plays, short stories, and novels. He then turned to personal memoirs to express himself, producing in succession The Bicycle Rider in Beverly Hills (1952), Here Comes, There Goes, You Know Who (1961), Not Dying (1963), and Obituaries (1980), which was nominated for the American Book Award. A final volume of reminiscence, Births (1983), was published posthumously.

From the guide to the William Saroyan Papers, 1926-1981, (Stanford University. Libraries. Dept. of Special Collections and University Archives.)

Biography

Novelist, short-story writer, dramatist, and essayist, William Saroyan was born in Fresno, California in 1908. A high-school dropout, Saroyan was largely self-educated and decided at an early age to pursue a career as a writer, drawing on his experience as an Armenian-American growing up in California.

His first published works were sketches in The Overland Monthly in 1928, which inspired him to seek his fortune in New York City. In 1934 Story Magazine printed "The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze." The immediate public acclaim led to publication of the collection The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze and Other Stories (1934) by Random House. He followed this success with two more short story collections in 1936, Three Times Three and Inhale and Exhale.

Transforming one of these stories into his first dramatic production, My Heart's in the Highlands (1939), Saroyan then wrote The Time of Your Life (1939-40), for which he received both New York Drama Critics' Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The same year he released the story collection, My Name is Aram (1940), a Book of the Month Club selection.

In late 1941 Saroyan agreed to work for Louis B. Mayer in Hollywood. This resulted both in the Oscar-winning MGM film, The Human Comedy, (1943) as well as the popular novelized version of the original screenplay, published by Harcourt Brace simultaneously with the movie's opening.

Drafted into the army, Saroyan was stationed during part of World War II in London, where he wrote the controversial anti-war book, The Adventures of Wesley Jackson (1946). Through the 1950s he continued to produce plays, short stories, and novels. He then turned to personal memoirs to express himself, producing in succession The Bicycle Rider in Beverly Hills (1952), Here Comes, There Goes, You Know Who (1961), Not Dying (1963), and Obituaries (1980), which was nominated for the American Book Award. A final volume of reminiscence, Births (1983), was published posthumously.

From the guide to the William Saroyan notebooks, 1932-1939, (Stanford University. Libraries. Dept. of Special Collections and University Archives.)

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Subjects:

  • Drama (American)
  • Authors, American--Correspondence
  • Theater--20th century
  • Theater--History--20th century
  • Ballet, U.S
  • Book reviewing
  • Drama--Subjects--World war, 1939-1945
  • Watercolor painting--20th century
  • Drama--Promptbooks and typescripts
  • Smiling
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Authors, American--20th century--Correspondence
  • Authors, American
  • World War, 1939-1945--Drama
  • American drama--20th century
  • Prompt-book
  • Armenian Americans
  • Theater
  • Philosophical literature
  • American literature--20th century
  • Armenian Americans--Family relationships

Occupations:

  • Dramatists

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • California (as recorded)
  • California--San Francisco (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • California (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)