Report of the Committee for Changing Inscription under Lee Bust, Hall of Fame, United Daughters of the Confederacy, by Mrs. Walter D. Lamar [manuscript], 1948, Sep. 12. 1948.

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United Daughters of the Confederacy. Committee for Changing Inscription under Lee Bust, Hall of Fame. Report of the Committee for Changing Inscription under Lee Bust, Hall of Fame, United Daughters of the Confederacy, by Mrs. Walter D. Lamar [manuscript], 1948, Sep. 12.

Report of the Committee for Changing Inscription under Lee Bust, Hall of Fame, United Daughters of the Confederacy, by Mrs. Walter D. Lamar [manuscript], 1948, Sep. 12. 1948.

The typescript report of the Committee gives a brief account of changing the inscription beneath Robert E. Lee's bust in the Hall of Fame at New York University from the spurious "Duty is the sublimist word ..." to "There is a true honor-- the glory of duty done ...." The printed report of the President General of the United Daughters of the Confederacy for 1939 accompanies the committee report.

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New York University. Hall of Fame for Great Americans

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Van Wyck Brooks served as an Elector for the Hall of Fame from 1950 onwards. From the description of Correspondence to Van Wyck Brooks, 1949-1960. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 182622044 ...

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Robert Edward Lee (1807-1870) served as General of the Confederate Army in the U.S. Civil War and was president of Washington College in Lexington, Virginia from 1865 to 1870. Lee spent the first twenty-three years of his military career in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. From 1837 to 1841 he was superintending engineer for the harbor of St. Louis and the upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers. Robert E. Lee was a United States Army officer, 1829-1861; commander of Virginia forces in the ...

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The Southern Cross of Honor award, which later became the Cross of Military Service, originated on Oct. 13, 1862 as an act of the Confederate Congress to recognize the courage and good conduct of officers, non-commissioned officers and privates of the Confederate army. However, due to wartime shortages, the medals were not made, but the recipients' names were recorded in an Honor Roll for future reference. The cross's design was created by Mrs. Alexander S. Erwin in July 1898. It featured a cros...