Papers. 1921-1979.

ArchivalResource

Papers. 1921-1979.

Among these papers are correspondence (1921-1969); accounts, records, documents, legal papers, and certificates; a fragmentary diary (1928); teaching plan books and other teaching records; writings--an autobiography, articles, a book review, letters-to-the-editor, juvenile novels, plays, poems, a radio serial, a short story, and theses; sheet music; notes and lists; scrapbooks and clippings; biographical sketches and obituaries; photographs; programs, invitations, and announcements; pamphlets, leaflets, and a few periodicals; musical scores of Cullen's poems set to music and phonograph records. The greater part of the collection consists of the correspondence of Countee Cullen (1921-1945) and his writings.

7.8 linear ft. 50 oversize items.

eng,

fre,

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Horne, Frank, 1899-1974.

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Wright, Richard, 1764-1836

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http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ht2ps3 (person)

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