Seattle City Light

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Seattle Dept. of Lighting and Water Works created in 1890; city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept.; in 1951 the Department purchased the private electrical power supply operations in Seattle; current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized. Seattle approved the purchase of the land and money for construction of the plant in 1913; construction began in 1914, and was finished in 1917. Additions were made in 1918 and 1921. The plant was decommissioned in 1987 and sold in 1990.

From the description of Lake Union Steam Plant construction photograph album, 1914. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 755016115

The original Gorge Dam was the third dam built by Seattle City Light on the Skagit River. Construction of the dam involved building a railroad to transport materials from Rockport to the dam site. The railroad was completed between 1920 and 1922. The dam, finished in 1924, included a diverting weir near the mouth of Gorge Creek, an 11,000-foot tunnel through solid granite, a power house, and a transmission line. Photographs in this series document a later project at Gorge Dam which began in 1948 and included a powerhouse and a diversion dam. The Gorge plant powerhouse was completed in 1951, and construction of the diversion dam began in February 1955. The Gorge diversion dam was built 2.5 miles above the Gorge powerhouse. The diversion dam was designed to make more efficient use of the Skagit River water flowing down from Diablo Dam, about five miles up the river. It replaced the wood crib dam which had been diverting the river water into the Gorge powerhouse tunnel since 1924. Gorge High Dam was dedicated in 1961 and completed in 1962.

From the description of Gorge Development Project photographs and photograph albums, 1948-1962. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 154691078

In 1917, Seattle City Light, headed by Superintendent James D. Ross, applied for permission to develop the Skagit River for hydroelectric power. In 1918, City Light received permission from the federal government to construct the Gorge and Newhalem powerhouses; the first task was to construct a thirty-one-mile railroad for the purpose of carrying workers and equipment to the construction sites. Newhalem Dam was the first to be constructed, and Newhalem Powerhouse went live in 1921, supplying power not to Seattle but for the construction effort. Due to the rising cost of the project, the Gorge Dam began as a wooden one, later to be replaced by a concrete structure. Power from the Gorge Dam reached Seattle in Sept. 1924. Over the years, three dams would be constructed along the Skagit River. The first of these, completed in 1930, was Diablo Dam. At 389 feet, it was at the time the tallest dam in the world. In 1937, construction began on Ruby Dam, which was renamed Ross Dam after James D. Ross's death in 1939. This dam was originally intended to be used for storage rather than generation. The reservoir created by Ross Dam eventually flooded into British Columbia. After a series of negotiations, Seattle came to a 1984 agreement with British Columbia that no further construction would occur on Ross Dam; instead, Seattle would purchase power from British Columbia. The Gorge High Dam was completed in 1961. Today, these three dams supply twenty-five percent of Seattle's power, and Skagit Tours, which began as a tourist attraction in the 1920s, continues to be popular.

From the description of Seattle City Light Skagit Project, Diablo Dam construction photograph albums, 1919-1936. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 82480168

City Light provides electricity, electrical, and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superindendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Slide Collection, 1920-1975, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric power project, which began supplying power to Seattle in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northern Washington began operation in 1967 and currently supplies over half of City Light's power generation. Approximately ten percent of City Light's income comes from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the Lake Union Steam Plant Construction Photograph Album, 1914, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Dept. of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Dept. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the city purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Dept. the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northern Washington began operation in 1967 and currently supplies over half of City Light's power generation. Approximately ten percent of City Light's income comes from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the description of Seattle City Light Load and Flow Data records, 1905-1995. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757739642

From the description of Seattle City Light power management records, 1909-1986. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 755034819

From the description of Seattle City Light Skagit management records, 1949-1997 (bulk, 1966-1995). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758687243

From the description of Seattle City Light Copper Creek Dam Project records, 1974-1981. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757518142

From the description of Seattle City Light public power speeches and radio presentations, 1932-1938. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 767644526

From the description of Seattle City Light Skagit Hydroelectric Project records, 1908-1975 (bulk, 1921-1957). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757855479

From the description of Seattle City Light facility maintenance and operations records, 1911-1984. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758651733

From the description of Seattle City Light Flood Control records, 1917-1978. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758004886

From the description of Seattle City Light snow surveys, 1936-1995 (bulk, 1945-1980). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757996187

From the description of Seattle City Light regional power management records, 1943-1982. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757994600

From the description of Seattle City Light Boundary Dam Project records, 1933-1983 (bulk, 1953-1969). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757401417

From the description of Seattle City Light Creston Coal Plant Project records, 1980-1984. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 757559639

From the description of Seattle City Light regional power planning records, 1948-2003 (bulk, 1954-1998). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 766079472

From the description of Seattle City Light distribution branch directors' records, 1997-2003 (bulk, 2001-2003). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758393319

From the description of Seattle City Light weather data records, 1931-1983. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758394051

From the description of Seattle City Light Central files, 1988-1992. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 779534761

From the description of Seattle City Light employee survey records, 1992-1995. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758518033

Seattle Dept. of Lighting and Water Works created in 1890; city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept.; in 1951 the Department purchased the private electrical power supply operations in Seattle; current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the description of Seattle City Light annual reports of public electric utilities, 1967-1997. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754955603

From the description of Seattle City Light Biomass Project records, 1978-1985. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 756929996

From the description of Seattle City Light property management records, 1910-1992. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754964946

From the description of Seattle City Light Community Relations records, 1982-1994. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 769444864

City Light provides electricity, electrical, and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the 2006 Windstorm Damage Digital Photograph Collection, 2006, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Dept. of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Dept. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the city purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Dept. the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northern Washington began operation in 1967 and currently supplies over half of City Light's power generation. Approximately ten percent of City Light's income comes from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Dept. was reorganized..

From the description of Seattle City Light general and plant ledgers, 1908-1982. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 751984983

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond inssue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this department began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle in 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1973 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Glass Lantern Slides, 1903-1945, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Skagit Railway Reports, 1926-1943, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Regional Power Management Records, 1943-1982, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Skagit Hydroelectric Project Records, 1908-1975, 1921-1957, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Copper Creek Dam Project Records, 1974-1981, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Millennium Legacy Lighting Project Records, 1997-2000, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle Department of Lighting Cedar River Daily Reports of Water Conditions, 1920-1922, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Regional Power Planning Records, 1948-2003, 1954-1998, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Weather Data, 1931-1984, 1952-1983, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Superintendents' Records, 1918-2006, 1939-2002, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Video Program Records, 1977-1995, 1982-1984, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Capital Improvement Project Management Team Records, 1996-2000, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Customer Service Administration Records, 1982-2001, 1991-1998, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Central Files, 1988-1992, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Skagit Management Records, 1949-1997, 1966-1995, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Load and Flow Data, 1905-1995, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Flood Control Records, 1917-1978, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Property Management Records, 1910-1992, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Power Management Records, 1909-1986, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Snow Surveys, 1936-1995, 1945-1980, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Annual Reports of Public Electric Utilities, 1967-1997, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle Department of Lighting Operating Revenue Account Books, 1935-1964, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Accountability Reports, 1996-2003, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Power Costs Reports, 1995-1998, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Boundary Dam Project Records, 1933-1983, 1953-1969, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Distribution Branch Directors' Records, 1997-2003, 2001-2003, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light General and Plant Ledgers, 1908-1982, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Biomass Project Records, 1978-1985, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Creston Coal Plant Project Records, 1980-1984, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Facility Maintenance and Operations Records, 1911-1984, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Employee Survey Records, 1992-1995, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Skagit Youth Camp was operated by Seattle City Light's Community Relations Division under Director Mary D. McKinney between 1991 and 1996. The program was a response to Mayor Norm Rice's directive to city departments to maximize resources on behalf of the city's youth. Each year, the program operated seven five-day summer camp sessions for economically disadvantaged, "at-risk" youth (ages eight to fourteen) from Seattle and the Skagit Valley. The camp utilitized City Light facilities at Newhalem and Diablo and aimed to contribute to the mental and physical well-being of the children by providing them with outdoor recreation and living experience, as well as educating them in environmental awareness. Activities included hiking, swimming, canoeing, sports, drama, and arts and crafts, as well as drug and alcohol awareness. The Skagit Youth Camp also participated in the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture's Summer Food Service Program, serving breakfast, lunch, and a snack to qualifying children five days a week during the summer months. The camp was headed by the camp director, who oversaw its operation through an on-site director, program leader, health services coordinator, administrative specialist, and seven camp counselors. In 1997, operation of the Skagit Youth Camp was transferred to the Dept. of Parks and Recreation due to budget problems. The Parks Dept. ran the summer camp for one season; it was discontinued the following year.

From the description of Seattle City Light Skagit Youth Camp records, 1991-1996. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71128498

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project, which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the Gorge Dam Development Project Photograph Albums, 1948-1962, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Communications and Public Affairs Division Digital Photographs, 2007, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Masonry Dam Construction Photograph Album, 1912-1915, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Department History File, 1894-1972, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Negatives, 1914-1995, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers; largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest; Seattle Dept. of Lighting and Water Works created in 1890; city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept.; 1951 the department purchased the private electrical power supply operations in Seattle; current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the department was reorganized.

From the description of History file, 1900-1980. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70924974

From the description of Negatives, 1914-1995. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70924977

City Light provides electricity, electrical, and conservation services to its publis and private customers. It is the larget public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibilitiy for electrcial energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical supply operations, make the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

From the guide to the Field System Operations Digital Photograph Collection, 2005-2007, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle Dept. of Lighting and Water Works created in 1890; city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept.; 1951 the department purchased the private electrical power supply operations in Seattle; current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the department was reorganized.

From the description of Seattle City Light annual reports, 1910-1994. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70961814

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Dept. of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Dept. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A city charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Dept. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the city purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Dept. the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northern Washington began operation in 1967 and currently supplies over half of City Light's power generation. Approximately ten percent of City Light's income comes from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Dept. was reorganized.

From the description of Seattle City Light accountability reports, 1996-2003. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 750623511

From the description of Seattle City Light Millennium Legacy Lighting Project records, 1997-2000. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 758388969

James Delmage (J. D.) Ross, known as the Father of Seattle City Light, was Born in Chatham, Ontario in 1872. Ross left for the Northwest in 1898, became an assistant city engineer for the City of Seattle in 1902 and designed the City’s first hydroelectric dam on the Cedar River. In 1911 Ross was appointed Superintendent of the newly-created City Light department, a post he held for the rest of his life. Although he was fired by Mayor Edwards in 1931, Ross was rehired the same year following Edwards’ recall. A tireless advocate of municipal ownership of public utilities, Ross won the rights to develop hydroelectric projects on the Skagit River. Under his leadership, the Gorge Dam and powerhouse were completed, as well as the Diablo Dam project. In 1937 President Roosevelt appointed Ross a commissioner on the Securities and Exchange Commission and shortly thereafter named him as the first administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration. Ross continued to serve as Superintendent of City Light during this time and initiated a third power project on the Skagit, Ruby Dam, before his death in 1939.

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Superintendent James D. Ross Reference Material, 1911-1996, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project, which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

Seattle City Light's advertising during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s reflected the company's desire to publicize not only the benefits of electric light, heat, and appliances powered by City Light energy, but also to advertise the city itself. City Light advertisements presented Seattle as "the Electric City," where, in the 1950s, rates were less than half the national average.

From the guide to the Advertising Scrapbooks, 1954-1974, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates back to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. The formulation of this public utility stemmed from fear of monopolization by private companies and was reinforced by the inadequacy of those companies during the Great Fire of 1889. Unable to gain access to private water, much of the business district was burned to the ground. Citizens responded eagerly to the idea of publicly owned water and electricity, which was later encouraged as part of President Roosevelt's New Deal in the 1930s.

In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. This was the nation's first municipally owned hydroelectric project. Electricity from this development began to serve customers in Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department, making it a full member of the City's Board of Public Works. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924 with the completion of the Gorge Dam.

Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the local private electrical power company, the Puget Sound Power and Light Company, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue.

The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the department was reorganized. As a municipally owned public power system, Seattle City Light is governed by elected Seattle officials. Administrative authority rests with the Superintendent and an executive team that includes the department's Chief of Staff, Service and Energy Delivery Officer, Human Resources Officer, Power Supply and Environmental Affairs Officer, and Chief Financial Officer. City Light is responsible for electrical service and streetlight service, streetlight problems, and also conservation, both residential and commercial/industrial.

City Light provides low-cost, reliable, and environmentally responsible electric power to approximately 395,000 customers in Seattle and neighboring areas, including Burien, Lake Forest Park, Normandy Park, Renton, SeaTac, Shoreline, Tukwila, and unincorporated King County. It is the ninth-largest public power system in the United States and has the lowest rates among comparably sized cities in the United States.

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Community Relations Records, 1982-1994, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

The Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission (SEEC) was established by a 1984 Treaty between Canada and the U.S. It is based on an agreement between the City of Seattle and the Province of British Columbia to settle the controversy over the High Ross Dam proposal

From the guide to the Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission Records, 1985-1998, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project, which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

In 1917, Seattle City Light -- headed by Superintendent James D. Ross -- applied for permission to develop the Skagit River for hydroelectric power. In 1918, City Light received permission from the federal government to construct the Gorge and Newhalem powerhouses; the first task was to construct a 31-mile railroad for the purpose of carrying workers and equipment to the construction sites. Newhalem Dam was the first to be constructed, and Newhalem Powerhouse went live in 1921, supplying power not to Seattle but for the construction effort. Due to the rising cost of the project, the Gorge Dam began as a wooden one, later to be replaced by a concrete structure. Power from the Gorge Dam reached Seattle in September of 1924.

Over the years, three dams would be constructed along the Skagit River. The first of these, completed in 1930, was Diablo Dam. At 389 feet, it was at the time the tallest dam in the world. In 1937, construction began on Ruby Dam, which was renamed Ross Dam after James D. Ross' death in 1939. This dam was originally intended to be used for storage rather than generation. The reservoir created by Ross Dam eventually flooded into British Columbia. After a series of negotiations, Seattle came to a 1984 agreement with British Columbia that no further construction would occur on Ross Dam; instead, Seattle would purchase power from British Columbia. The Gorge High Dam was completed in 1961.

Today, these three dams supply twenty-five percent of Seattle's power, and Skagit Tours, which began as a tourist attraction in the 1920s, continues to be popular.

From the guide to the Newhalem and Diablo Dams Construction Photograph Albums, 1919-1936, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric power project, which began supplying power to Seattle in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

Construction of Ruby Dam, Steps One and Two, began in 1937 after City Light received three million dollars from the federal Public Works Administration to begin clearing timber from Ruby Basin. The dam was the third built by Seattle City Light as part of the Skagit River hydroelectric power project. It was renamed Ross Dam in 1939 in memory of James D. Ross, the long-time superintendent of City Light who died in March of that year. The first step of Ross Dam's construction was completed in 1940. The dam was 305 feet high and created a reservoir with a water level at 1380 feet above sea level. Ross Dam was initially constructed for storage rather than power generation.

Step Two in the construction of Ross Dam began in 1943. The dam height was to be raised to nearly 500 feet. Step Three was approved by the Federal Power Commission (FPC) in 1947 and at completion in 1949, the dam stood at 540 feet. Ross Lake, the reservoir behind the dam, rose to 1615 feet above sea level, well above the elevation of the Skagit River at the British Columbia border.

In 1950, the FPC authorized construction of Ross Powerhouse and three generating units. During 1952 to 1956, Ross Powerhouse was constructed and four generators went on-line, doubling the electrical output generated by City Light. The fourth generating unit was installed at Ross Powerhouse in 1956.

The United States Congress created Ross Lake National Recreation Area and the North Cascades National Park in 1968. In 1970, Seattle applied to the FPC for construction of a fourth step of Ross Dam, which would raise the reservoir elevation to 1725 feet. The final water level of Ross Reservoir was not settled until 1984, after lengthy negotiations with the International Joint Commission comprised of representatives from the State of Washington, City of Seattle, and British Columbia, Canada. A fourth step was authorized in 1977, but authorization was revoked in 1984 by an 80-year agreement between Seattle and British Columbia stipulating that the fourth step would not be constructed, that British Columbia would supply power to Seattle in lieu of construction, and that Seattle would pay British Columbia an amount relative to construction costs. This agreement also created the Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission, a bi-national agency who mission is to foster education about the upper Skagit River watershed.

From the guide to the Ross Dam Construction Photograph Albums, 1938-1948, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project, which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

The Skagit Youth Camp was operated by Seattle City Light's Community Relations Division under Director Mary D. McKinney between 1991 and 1996. The program was a response to Mayor Norm Rice's directive to city departments to maximize resources on behalf of the city's youth. Each year, the program operated seven five-day summer camp sessions for economically disadvantaged, "at-risk" youth (ages eight to fourteen) from Seattle and the Skagit Valley.

The camp utilitized City Light facilities at Newhalem and Diablo and aimed to contribute to the mental and physical well-being of the children by providing them with outdoor recreation and living experience, as well as educating them in environmental awareness. Activities included hiking, swimming, canoeing, sports, drama, and arts and crafts, as well as drug and alcohol awareness. The Skagit Youth Camp also participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Summer Food Service Program, serving breakfast, lunch, and a snack to qualifying children five days a week during the summer months.

The camp was headed by the Camp Director, who oversaw its operation through an On-Site Director, Program Leader, Health Services Coordinator, Administrative Specialist, and seven camp counselors. In 1997, operation of the Skagit Youth Camp was transferred to the Department of Parks and Recreation due to budget problems. The Parks Department ran the summer camp for one season; it was discontinued the following year.

From the guide to the Skagit Youth Camp Records, 1991-1996, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. Electricity from this development began to serve Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project, which began supplying power in 1924. Both public and private power were supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the private electrical power supply operations, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the Department was reorganized.

Lack of rainfall in the western Columbia Plateau meant its farmland was difficult to work and yielded little. A plan for irrigation was necessary; however, the question of how to irrigate generated controversy for many years. While some favored a gravity canal irrigation system, others felt that a dam on the Columbia River at Grand Coulee was the best option. The dam supporters eventually won out when a 1932 Army Corps of Engineers survey supported their position, suggesting several dams on the Columbia River -- including the Grand Coulee Dam.

The dam was begun in 1933 with Public Works Administration funds. Although its initial purpose was to irrigate Central Washington farmlands, upon the dam's completion in 1942, it was used primarily to produce electricity needed for the war effort. After the war, the initial function of irrigation continued.

The 550-foot structure is North America's largest concrete dam and is used both for irrigation and hydroelectric power generation. The Grand Coulee Dam is a popular tourist attraction.

From the guide to the Columbia Basin "Z" Canyon Photograph Album, 1933, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

City Light provides electricity and electrical and conservation services to its public and private customers. It is the largest public utility in the Pacific Northwest. Public responsibility for electrical energy dates back to 1890 with creation of the Department of Lighting and Water Works. The formulation of this public utility stemmed from fear of monopolization by private companies and was reinforced by the inadequacy of those companies during the Great Fire of 1889. Unable to gain access to private water, much of the business district was burned to the ground. Citizens responded eagerly to the idea of publicly owned water and electricity, which was later encouraged as part of President Roosevelt's New Deal in the 1930s.

In 1902, Seattle voters passed a bond issue to develop hydroelectric power on the Cedar River under the administration of the Water Department. This was the nation's first municipally owned hydroelectric project. Electricity from this development began to serve customers in Seattle in 1905. A City Charter amendment in 1910 created the Lighting Department, making it a full member of the City's Board of Public Works. Under the leadership of Superintendent James D. Ross, the department developed the Skagit River hydroelectric project which began supplying power in 1924 with the completion of the Gorge Dam.

Both public and private power was supplied to Seattle until 1951 when the City purchased the local private electrical power company, the Puget Sound Power and Light Company, making the Lighting Department the sole supplier. The Boundary Project in northeastern Washington began operations in 1967 and supplied over half of City Light's power generation. By the early 21st century, approximately ten percent of City Light's income came from the sale of surplus energy to customers in the Northwest and Southwest with the remainder of City Light's financial support coming from customer revenue. The remainder of City Light's financial support comes from customer revenue.

The current name of the agency was adopted in 1978 when the department was reorganized. As a municipally owned public power system, Seattle City Light is governed by elected Seattle officials. Administrative authority rests with the Superintendent and an executive team that includes the department's Chief of Staff, Service and Energy Delivery Officer, Human Resources Officer, Power Supply and Environmental Affairs Officer, and Chief Financial Officer. City Light is responsible for electrical service and streetlight service, streetlight problems, and also conservation, both residential and commercial/industrial.

City Light provides low-cost, reliable, and environmentally responsible electric power to approximately 395,000 customers in Seattle and neighboring areas, including Burien, Lake Forest Park, Normandy Park, Renton, SeaTac, Shoreline, Tukwila, and unincorporated King County. It is the ninth-largest public power system in the United States and has the lowest rates among comparably sized cities in the United States.

From the guide to the Seattle City Light Public Power Speeches and Radio Presentations, 1932-1938, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light property management records, 1910-1992. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Park, Thomas, b. 1894. Seattle City Light scrapbooks, 1874-1959, bulk 1932-1959. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Department of Lighting Cedar River Daily Reports of Water Conditions, 1920-1922 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Communications and Public Affairs Division Digital Photographs, 2007 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Negatives, 1914-1995 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Community Relations records, 1982-1994. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Weather Data, 1931-1984, 1952-1983 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Eli and Esther Rashkov papers, 1954-1986 (bulk 1975-1980). University of Washington Libraries
creatorOf Seattle City Light Creston Coal Plant Project Records, 1980-1984 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light annual reports of public electric utilities, 1967-1997. Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Eli and Esther Rashkov papers, 1954-1986, 1975-1980 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light regional power planning records, 1948-2003 (bulk, 1954-1998). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Load and Flow Data records, 1905-1995. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. History file, 1900-1980. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Skagit Management Records, 1949-1997, 1966-1995 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Power Costs Reports, 1995-1998 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Video Program Records, 1977-1995, 1982-1984 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Employee Survey Records, 1992-1995 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Field System Operations Digital Photograph Collection, 2005-2007 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Masonry Dam construction photograph album, 1912-1915. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf 2006 Windstorm Damage Digital Photograph Collection, 2006 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Masonry Dam Construction Photograph Album, 1912-1915 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Public Power Speeches and Radio Presentations, 1932-1938 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Boundary Dam Project records, 1933-1983 (bulk, 1953-1969). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light general and plant ledgers, 1908-1982. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Skagit Youth Camp records, 1991-1996. Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn North Cascades Conservation Council records, 1901-2003 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Millennium Legacy Lighting Project records, 1997-2000. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light annual reports, 1910-1994. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Copper Creek Dam Project Records, 1974-1981 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Clara Fraser Defense Committee records, 1979-1983 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
referencedIn Citizens' Rate Advisory Committee Records, 1983-1988 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Regional Power Planning Records, 1948-2003, 1954-1998 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Skagit Project, Diablo Dam construction photograph albums, 1919-1936. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light snow surveys, 1936-1995 (bulk, 1945-1980). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light power management records, 1909-1986. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Columbia Basin "Z" Canyon Photograph Album, 1933 Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Human Resources. Seattle weatherization assistance programs outreach records, 1980-1994. Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Randy Revelle papers, 1973-1985 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Skagit Hydroelectric Project records, 1908-1975 (bulk, 1921-1957). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Distribution Branch Directors' Records, 1997-2003, 2001-2003 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Creston Coal Plant Project records, 1980-1984. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Property Management Records, 1910-1992 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Utility Franchise Records, 1896-1983, 1908-1973 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Gorge Development Project photographs and photograph albums, 1948-1962. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light regional power management records, 1943-1982. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Department History File, 1894-1972 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Flood Control Records, 1917-1978 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Skagit Railway Reports, 1926-1943 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Flood Control records, 1917-1978. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Columbia Basin "Z" Canyon photograph album and map, 1933. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Lowe, Jet. Historic American Engineering Record no. WA-24 (Skagit River and Newhalem Creek Hydroelectric Projects) photograph collection, 1920-1989 (bulk July 1987 and July 1989) [graphic]. University of Washington Libraries
creatorOf Seattle City Light Central Files, 1988-1992 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Boundary Dam Project Records, 1933-1983, 1953-1969 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Department of Lighting Operating Revenue Account Books, 1935-1964 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Regional Power Management Records, 1943-1982 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Newhalem and Diablo Dams Construction Photograph Albums, 1919-1936 Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Smith, Joe, 1872-1962. Joe Smith papers, 1890-1962. University of Washington Libraries
creatorOf Seattle City Light Community Relations Records, 1982-1994 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. Seattle Lighting Department scrapbooks, 1928-1939. University of Washington Libraries
creatorOf Lake Union Steam Plant Construction Photograph Album, 1914 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Advertising Scrapbooks, 1954-1974 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Annual Reports of Public Electric Utilities, 1967-1997 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light facility maintenance and operations records, 1911-1984. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Biomass Project records, 1978-1985. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Lake Union Steam Plant construction photograph album, 1914. Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle (Wash.). Engineering Dept. Seattle Engineering Department utility franchise records, 1896-1985 (bulk 1908-1973). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Power Management Records, 1909-1986 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Negatives, 1914-1995. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Skagit Youth Camp Records, 1991-1996 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Snow Surveys, 1936-1995, 1945-1980 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle (Wash.). Historic Preservation Program. International Special Review District records, 1973-1997. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Accountability Reports, 1996-2003 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Superintendent James D. Ross Reference Material, 1911-1996 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Central files, 1988-1992. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Gorge Dam Development Project Photograph Albums, 1948-1962 Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Subject Files, 1978-1985 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Slide Collection, 1920-1975 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Superintendents' Records, 1918-2006, 1939-2002 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission Records, 1985-1998 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Skagit management records, 1949-1997 (bulk, 1966-1995). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Biomass Project Records, 1978-1985 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle City Light Employee Scrapbooks, 1874-1959, 1932-1959 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Customer Service Administration Records, 1982-2001, 1991-1998 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Richard J. Brooks Papers, 1956-2000 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Seattle City Light General and Plant Ledgers, 1908-1982 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Load and Flow Data, 1905-1995 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Historic American Engineering Record no. WA-24 (Skagit River and Newhalem Creek Hydroelectric Projects) photograph collection, 1920-1989, July 1987 and July 1989 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Seattle City Light Glass Lantern Slides, 1903-1945 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle Weatherization Assistance Programs Outreach Records, 1980-1994 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light weather data records, 1931-1983. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light employee survey records, 1992-1995. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light public power speeches and radio presentations, 1932-1938. Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Carlson, Iver Walter. Iver W. Carlson scrapbooks, 1919-1958. University of Washington Libraries
referencedIn Seattle (Wash.). Neighborhood Planning Office. Neighborhood Planning Office director's subject files, 1994-1999. Seattle Municipal Archives
referencedIn Subject Files, 1995-2006 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light accountability reports, 1996-2003. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Capital Improvement Project Management Team Records, 1996-2000 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle City Light Annual Reports, 1910-1985 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light Copper Creek Dam Project records, 1974-1981. Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Ross Dam Construction Photograph Albums, 1938-1948 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light distribution branch directors' records, 1997-2003 (bulk, 2001-2003). Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Facility Maintenance and Operations Records, 1911-1984 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Millennium Legacy Lighting Project Records, 1997-2000 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle City Light Skagit Hydroelectric Project Records, 1908-1975, 1921-1957 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith American Camping Association. corporateBody
associatedWith American Public Power Association. corporateBody
associatedWith BC Parks corporateBody
associatedWith Boundary Hydroelectric Project corporateBody
associatedWith Bradley, Roberta Palm person
correspondedWith Brooks, Richard J. person
associatedWith Carlson, Iver Walter. person
associatedWith Cedar Falls Power Plant (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Cedar Falls Power Plant (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Cedar Falls Power Plant (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Citizens' Rate Advisory Committee (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Compton, Jim person
associatedWith Copper Creek Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Diablo Powerhouse (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Diablo Powerhouse (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Dolan, Linda Sutliff. person
associatedWith Duwamish Substation (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Federal Power Commission Task Force on Downstream Benefits Provided by Headwater Improvements on the Columbia. corporateBody
associatedWith Friends of City Light. corporateBody
associatedWith Georgetown Steam Plant (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Georgetown Steam Plant (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Gorge Powerhouse (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Gorge Powerhouse (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Gorge Powerhouse (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Grand Coulee Dam (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Hardy, Randall W. person
associatedWith Hildt, Michael person
associatedWith Hoffman, Eugene R. person
associatedWith International Joint Commission corporateBody
associatedWith Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Large Public Power Council corporateBody
associatedWith Lofton, Andrew person
associatedWith McFadden, George William. person
associatedWith McKinney, Mary D. person
associatedWith Murray, Robert H. person
associatedWith Natural Resources Defense Council. corporateBody
associatedWith Nelson, John M. person
associatedWith Newhalem Powerhouse (Newhalem, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith North Cascades Conservation Council corporateBody
associatedWith Northwest Power Pool. corporateBody
associatedWith Northwest Power Pool. Coordinating Group corporateBody
associatedWith Northwest Public Power Association. corporateBody
associatedWith Pacific Northwest Governors' Power Policy Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Pacific Northwest Governors’ Power Policy Committee corporateBody
associatedWith Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Park, Thomas, b. 1894. person
associatedWith Public Generating Pool corporateBody
associatedWith Public Utility District No. 1 of Pend Oreille County (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Puget Sound Power and Light Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Puget Sound Utilities Council. corporateBody
associatedWith Raver, Paul J. 1894-1963. person
associatedWith Recchi, Joseph P. person
associatedWith Revelle, Randy person
associatedWith Ross, J. D. 1872-1939. person
associatedWith Ross, J. D. (James Delmage), 1872-1939 person
associatedWith Seattle City Light Biomass Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle City Light. Community Relations Division. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle City Light. Office of Conservation. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle City Light. Power Management Division. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle Millennium Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). City Clerk corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Human Resources. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting and Water Works corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting and Water Works corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Lighting and Water Works. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Parks and Recreation corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Parks and Recreation. corporateBody
correspondedWith Seattle (Wash.). Engineering Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Engineering Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Historic Preservation Program. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Human Services Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Law Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Law Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Lighting Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Mayor corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Municipal Light and Power Plant System. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Neighborhood Planning Office. corporateBody
associatedWith Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission corporateBody
associatedWith Skagit River Hydroelectric Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Smith, Joe, 1872-1962. person
associatedWith Summer Food Service Program (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington corporateBody
associatedWith Tacoma (Wash.). Dept. of Public Utilities. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Bonneville Power Administration. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Dept. of Energy. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Federal Power Commission. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Federal Trade Commission. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Forest Service corporateBody
associatedWith United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. National Park Service corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Rural Electrification Administration. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Securities and Exchange Commission. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Weather Bureau. corporateBody
associatedWith University of Washington. College of Forest Resources. corporateBody
associatedWith Vickery, Gordon Franklin, 1920-1996 person
associatedWith Washington Public Power Supply System. corporateBody
associatedWith Washington (State). Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council. corporateBody
associatedWith Washington Water Power Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Western Systems Coordinating Council. corporateBody
associatedWith Zarker, Gary E. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Diablo Dam (Wash.)
Newhalem (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Z Canyon (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Boundary Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington
Seattle (Wash.)
Tukwila (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Newhalem Creek (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Washington (State)
Pend Oreille River
Northwest, Pacific
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Cedar River (King County, Wash.)
Diablo Dam (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Whatcom County
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Lewis River (Wash.)
Columbia River Watershed
Diablo Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Ross Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Cedar River Watershed (King County, Wash.)
Tukwila (Wash.)
Spokane River (Idaho and Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Ross Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington--Cedar Falls
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Washington--Seattle
Skagit River Valley (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Whatcom County (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Thunder Creek (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Skagit River Watershed (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Gorge Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.).
Grand Coulee (Wash. : Coulee)
Cedar River (King County, Wash.)
Washington (State)
Northern Cascades (British Columbia and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Boundary Dam (Wash.)
Union, Lake (Wash.)
Kiket Island (Wash.)
Cascade Range
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Lucky Peak Dam (Idaho)
Skagit River Valley (B.C. and Wash.)
Washington (State)
Newhalem (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
North Cascades National Park (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Washington (State)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Gorge Dam (Wash.)
Creston (Wash.)
Cedar Falls (Wash.)
Pend Oreille River
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Gorge Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River Watershed (B.C. and Wash.)
Cedar River Watershed (King County, Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit County (Wash.)
Ross Dam (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Diablo Dam (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Skagit River Watershed (B.C. and Wash.)
Samish Island (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Cedar Falls (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Cedar River (King County, Wash.)
Washington (State)
Ladder Creek (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Washington (State)--Seattle
Cedar River (King County, Wash.)
Washington (State)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
University Way (Seattle, Wash.)
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Washington (State)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Pend Oreille River
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Washington (State)
Gorge Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Diablo (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Boundary Dam (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Seattle (Wash.)
Kiket Island (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Columbia River
Copper Creek (Skagit County, Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Idaho
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Priest Rapids Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Boundary Dam (Wash.)
Skagit Youth Camp (Wash.)
Ross Dam (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)
Subject
Electric utilities--Washington (State)--Seattle
Hydroelectric power plants--Design and construction
Snow--Measurement
Electric lighting--Photographs
Consumers--Photographs
Recreation
Camps--Management
Electric industry workers--Photographs
Electric power--Photographs
Youth with social disabilities--Services for
National parks and reserves--Washington (State)
Municipal engineering--Photographs
Rivers and streams
Steam power plants--Maintenance and repair
Stores, Retail--Photographs
Labor-management committees--Washington--Seattle
Camp sites, facilities, etc.--Washington (State)
Cedar River (King County, Wash.)
Bridges--Lighting
Labor-management committees
Interconnected electric utility systems
Coal-fired power plants
Public utilities--Photographs
Fire protection districts
Steam power plants
Housing
Utility poles
Hydroelectric power plants--Photographs
Water tunnels--Photographs
Company towns
Railroads--Photographs
Community development
Rivers--Washington (State)
Copper Creek Project
Electric power
Nuclear power
Nuclear energy
Reservoirs--Washington
Electric lines--Washington (State)
Electric utilities--Finance
Steam power plants--Design and construction--Photographs
Construction workers--Photographs
Residential Buildings
Electric utilities
Electric utitlities
Surge tanks--Photographs
Millennium celebrations (Year 2000)--Washington--Seattle
Electric power--Conservation
Electric substations--Photographs
Hydroelectric power plants--Washington (State)--Seattle
Electric apparatus and appliances
Trails--Washington (State)
Coal-fired power plants--Washington (State)
Electric power consumption--Photographs
Real property
Lake Union Steam Plant--Washington (State)--Seattle
Climatology--Washington--Seattle
Streamflow--Washington--King County
Alcoholism--Prevention
Flood control
Gorges--Washington (State)--Photographs
Droughts
Electric utilities--Rates
Rain-making
Dams--Photographs
Denny Regrade
Public utility districts--Washington (State)
Photographs
Electric lines--Photographs
Electric power consumption--Washington--Seattle
Z Canyon (Wash.)
Hydroelectric power plants--Washington
Snow surveys--Washington (State)
Water-power
Environmental Conditions
Northern spotted owl
Millennium 2000
Fire protection districts--Washington--Whatcom County
Power resources Costs
Diversion weirs--Photographs
Public Utilities
Recreation--Washington (State)
Dams
Cofferdams--Photographs
Runoff
Overhead electric lines Right of way--Washington (State)
Rivers--Washington (State)--Photographs
Washington (State)
Suggestion systems
Endangered species--Washington (State)
Lucky Peak Dam (Idaho)
Water-power--Washington
Flood control--Washington (State)
Storms--Washington (State)--Seattle
Electric power plants
Traffic accidents--Washington (State)--Seattle
North Cascades National Park
Bridges Lighting--Washington--Seattle
Reservoirs--Washington (State)
Hydroelectric power plans--Washington (State)
Rivers
Hydrography--Washington (State)
Steam power plants--Photographs
Canyons
Gorge Powerhouse (Wash.)
Parks and Recreation
Fiber optic lighting systems
Tanks--Photographs
Snow Measurement--Washington (State)
Electric heating--Photographs
Diversion weirs--Washington (State)--Photographs
Trails--British Columbia
Logging
Public works
Streamflow--Washington (State)
Electric utilities--Rates--Washington--Seattle
Ross Lake National Recreation Area (Wash.)
Electricity
Employees Training of--Washington--Seattle
Power resources
Forest biomass
Scrapbooks
Cedar Falls (Wash.)
Employee-management relations in government--Washington--Seattle
Construction equipment--Photographs
Fisheries and Wildlife
Electricity--Safety measures
Real property--Washington (State)
Interiors
Campers (Persons)
Electric lines
Trees--Research
Labor unions
Hydrography
Municpial government--Records and correspondence
Diablo Powerhouse (Wash.)
Construction workers--Washington (State)
Public utilities--Washington (State)--Seattle
Youth--Services for--Washington (State)
Railroads
Electric utilities--Photographs
Collecting of accounts--Washington--Seattle
Drug abuse--Prevention
Advertising--Washington (State)--Seattle
Environmental education
Electric lighting
New Deal, 1933-1939
Electric substations--Washington--Seattle
Mountain railroads--Washington--Skagit County
Skagit Hydroelectric Project--Washington (State)--Seattle
Electricity Consumption
Floods
Exhibitions
Millennium celebrations (Year 2000)
Electric industry workers
Camp sites, facilities, etc.--British Columbia
Employee- management relations in government
Transportation
Electric apparatus and appliances--Washington--Seattle
Creston (Wash.)
Electric power plants--Washington (State)--Cedar Falls
Power Resources--Washington (State)
Apprenticeship programs--Washington--Seattle
Electric power--Conservation--Washington (State)--Seattle
Campers (Persons)--Washington (State)
Electric power--Economic aspects
Gorge Dam (Wash.)
Diablo Dam (Wash.)
Electric power--Management
Dams--Design and construction
Public utilities--Washington--Seattle
Houseboats--Photographs
Intakes (Hydraulic engineering)--Photographs
Floods--Washington (State)
Electric meters
Camps--Washington (State)
Power-plants
Neighborhoods--Washington (State)--Seattle
Swimming pools--Washington--Whatcom County
Marketing--Photographs
Ross Dam (Wash.)
Copper Creek (Skagit County, Wash.)
Water-supply
Priest Rapids Dam (Wash.)
Electric power--Washington (State)--Seattle
Ambulance serivce
Climatology
Elected officials--Washington (State)--Seattle
Steam power plants--Washington--Seattle
Nuclear energy--Washington (State)
Electric utilities Capital investments--Washington--Seattle
Reservoirs
Electric substations
Skagit River (B.C. and Wash.)
Dam construction--Washington (State)
Water-power--Photographs
Weather--Washington--Seattle
Dams--Washington (State)--Photographs
Weather--Washington (State)--Seattle
Tourism
Power resources Research--Washington--Seattle
Camp counselors
Forest biomass--Washington (State)
Water and Water Rights
Street lighting--Washington--Seattle
Landslides
Electric utilities--Northwest, Pacific
Street lighting
Dam construction--Washington (State)--Photographs
Electric heating
Transmission Lines--Washington (State)--Seattle
Electric power Conservation--Washington--Seattle
Electric power transmission--Washington
Pend Oreille River
Newhalem (Wash.)
Stream flow
Snow surveys
Cedar Falls Power Plant (Wash.)
Cedar River Watershed (King County, Wash.)
Lake Union Steam Plant (Seattle, Wash.)
Hydroelectric power plants--Washington (State)
Organizational change
Electric power transmission
mountains,
British Columbia
Vessels
Dam construction--Photographs
Swimming pools
Power resources--Research
Birds of prey
Washington
Hoisting machinery--Photographs
Boundary Dam (Wash.)
Seattle
Electric lighting--Washington (State)--Seattle
Water-power--Washington (State)--Seattle
Nuclear power plants
Dams--Washington (State)
Overhead electric lines--Right of way
Public utility districts
Penstocks--Photographs
Fund raising
Electric heating--Washington (State)--Seattle
Public relations
Hydroelectric power plants
Electric utilities--Economic aspects
Water-power--Washington (State)
Skagit River Hydroelectric Project
Sports and Recreation
Electric utilities--Washington--Seattle
Camps--Accreditation
Electric power--Washington--Seattle
Occupation
Camp counselors
Construction workers--Washington (State)
Activity

Corporate Body

Active 1967

Active 1997

Information

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