Seattle (Wash.). Engineering Dept.

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The Mayor is the chief executive officer of the City with responsibilities for law enforcement, appointing department heads, administering City departments and programs, and preparing and executing the City budget. Seattle's original Charter (1869) created the position of Mayor who served as ex-officio President of the Common Council. The 1875 Charter gave the Mayor a vote on Council. That was amended in 1886 to provide for a tie-breaking vote only. The 1890 Charter completely separated the Executive and Legislative branches. Mayoral terms were set at 4 years by the 1946 City Charter.

From the guide to the Seattle Mayors' Portraits, 1869-2004, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931 the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Seattle Local Climatological Monthly Summary, 1951-1983, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle Meteorological Summaries, 1908-1951, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle Engineering Department Negatives, 1910-1994, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Lake Washington Floating Bridge Construction Album, 1939-1940, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle Engineering Department Unrecorded Subject Files, 1890-1990, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Street Trees and Landscaping Records, 1957-2001, 1966-1996, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Engineering Department maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931 the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department

From the guide to the Seattle Engineering Department Property Ownership Lists and Abstracts, 1891-1904, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Lake City Sewer District served the community north of 85th Street. Seattle annexed 60 percent of the District area in 1953. The City assumed maintenance for the system while the District continued to provide service in the annexed area. In 1974-1975, the City purchased the remaining District assets.

From the guide to the Lake City Sewer District Records, 1949-1975, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

Seattle traffic issues fell under the jurisdiction of the Department of Streets and Sewers during the first three decades of the 20th Century. With the recognition of growing traffic engineering needs, the Office of Traffic Engineer was established within the Department in1930. The Department of Streets and Sewers was abolished by City Charter Amendment in 1936 and most of its functions absorbed by the Engineering Department. The Office of the Traffic Engineer became a division within the Department. When the functions of the Engineering Department were reorganized in 1997, the traffic engineering and transportation functions were consolidated in the newly formed Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Traffic Engineering Subject Files, 1926-1988, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931 the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Safety Photographs, 1947-1987, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Vehicles and Equipment Photograph Albums, 1920-1952, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

From the guide to the Seattle Bridges Photograph Album, 1910-1932, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

Maintained the city's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility; in 1931 absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 assumed the responsibilities of the the Depart of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department; in 1997 the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with Engineering Services Division of the Seattle Engineering Department and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities; traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in Seattle Transportation Department.

From the description of Engineering Department Annual Reports, 1899-1985. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70966322

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890.

In 1931, the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities, and in 1936, it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Engineering Department R.H. Thomson Freeway Records, 1958-1977, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931, the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities, and in 1936, it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department.

In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

Utility franchises grant permission to the grantee to use sidewalk, street, underground or air space owned by the City. Utility franchises are granted for tunnels, underground fuel tanks, pipes, overhead bridges, pipes, overhead wires, and bridges. Grantees are frequently businesses.

From the guide to the Utility Franchise Records, 1896-1983, 1908-1973, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931, the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities, and in 1936, it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department.

In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

Transportation from West Seattle to downtown Seattle had been problematic for decades; until the 1970s, two drawbridges were the major link between the two areas of the city. Although planning was authorized in the 1970s, the project was delayed until June 11, 1978, when the freighter Antonio Chavez struck and damaged one of the drawbridges, thereby forcing action on the issue. A state of emergency was declared, and emergency funds from the Department of Transportation and from Congress were added to existing funds for a bridge replacement.

In 1979, the City Council passed a resolution stating that the bridge damage caused "severe traffic disruption, congestion, and unsafe conditions" and approved a two-phase plan for a new West Seattle Freeway Bridge. Phase I would be a six-lane high-level bridge and Phase II would be a two-lane low-level bridge. Later in 1979, Ordinance 108643 authorized property acquisition, construction, and general obligation bonds to assist in funding the bridge's construction. The ordinance cited the importance of an improved bridge in assisting the development of the Harbor Island business area and Duwamish Industrial area. The City Council stated that the bridge design would "more effectively serve the needs of the City" by improving traffic flow, providing access to West Seattle and Harbor Island, improving safety on the bridge, and even reducing air pollution by cutting down on idling time as a result of the "uninterrupted flow of traffic." King County, the City and Port of Seattle, and the State of Washington would all contribute to bridge funding.

Construction on the West Seattle Freeway Bridge began in 1981, and the Phase I high-level bridge opened to traffic in 1984.

From the guide to the West Seattle Freeway Bridge Construction Photographs and Slides, 1980-1983, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890.

In 1931, the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities, and in 1936, it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Seattle Weather Data, 1892-1983, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931 the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

In October 1928, work began on the repaving of the deteriorating brick pavement of Third Avenue in downtown Seattle. The four-month project took place during the autumn, presenting potential weather problems, and was further complicated by the busy holiday shopping season, when both car and pedestrian traffic were heavy. Fortunately, the weather was favorable, and construction proceeded with speed and efficiency. In fact, one-way traffic was able to continue on Third Avenue during the construction, and much of the work was done before the Christmas shopping rush, opening streets up to traffic.

The repaving project was completed on February 2, 1929, and was considered "...a rush work project that may be without a parallel, considering the season of the year during which the work was done."

From the guide to the Third Avenue Repaving Photograph Album, 1923-1929, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

Located east of Tacoma, the Green-Duwamish River Basin covers 483 square miles. Originating in the Cascades, the Green River flows northwest and empties into Elliott Bay; the river turns into the Duwamish at the point where the Green and Black Rivers once converged.

Flooding in the Green River Valley was once a costly problem; it affected not only personal property, including crop losses and planting delays for hundreds of farms, but also city property and state and county roads. In 1947, an average of $200,000 total annual losses was estimated. Loss of human lives and of livestock also occurred during flooding periods. Possible methods for flood control included building a dam and reservoir on the Green River, constructing dykes, or excavating a river channel to carry flood waters. The dam, if "economically feasible," would be paid for by federal dollars. The Seattle Chamber of Commerce supported federal flood control, citing not only the high cost of flood damages, but also the potential for further agricultural and industrial development of the Duwamish basin if flooding were brought under control.

Government engineers also supported the idea of a dam; a project using federal funds to construct a dam on the Green River in Eagle Gorge was adopted by Congress in 1950. Originally known as the Eagle Gorge Dam, the dam was renamed Howard Hanson Dam, after the Seattle Chamber of Commerce Rivers and Harbors Committee chairman who was instrumental in the flood control project, when Hanson died in 1957. The dam was completed in 1962, and extensive development of the valley -- both agricultural and industrial -- soon followed. Although flood control remains the primary function of the Howard Hanson Dam, it is also used for irrigation and water supply.

From the guide to the Duwamish and Green Rivers Flood Control Studies, 1922-1956, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931 the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

Begun in 1898 and completed over thirty years later, the Denny Hill Regrade leveled one of Seattle's steepest hills, connecting neighborhoods and facilitating traffic flow. Before the regrade, Second Avenue rose 190 feet in the twelve blocks between Pioneer Square and Lenora Avenue, causing traffic and transportation problems in the area. The project began by flattening First Avenue between Pine Street and Denny Way. The sluiced-away dirt was dumped into Elliott Bay or used as filler on downtown streets. The leveling of the hill continued in 1906 and 1907; homeowners who refused to move had the hill sluiced away around them, leaving their houses on islands of dirt.

In 1928, the remaining portion of the hill was leveled using electric steam shovels; the dirt and debris was carried to scows on Elliott Bay by means of large conveyor belts. By the end of the project in 1931, Denny Hill had been flattened and the Denny Regrade neighborhood was born.

From the guide to the Denny Hill Regrade Photograph Albums, 1904-1929, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890.

In 1931, the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities, and in 1936, it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Seattle Engineering Department Strategic Action Plan Task Force Records, 1995-1996, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Seattle Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890.

In 1931, the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities, and in 1936, it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

From the guide to the Seattle Engineering Department Damage Cases, 1891-2003, 1914-1987, (City of Seattle Seattle Municipal Archives)

The Engineering Department (SED) maintained the City's streets and bridges, designed and oversaw construction of public works projects, provided traffic and transportation planning, and operated the sewer and solid waste utility. The position of City Surveyor was created in 1873 to survey the City, establish boundaries and street grades, and administer condemnation processes. This position was renamed City Engineer in 1890. In 1931 the Engineering Department absorbed part of the Department of Public Utilities and in 1936 it assumed the responsibilities of the Department of Streets and Sewers and the Traffic Department. In 1997, the water, solid waste, drainage, and wastewater utilities from the Engineering and Water departments were merged with the Engineering Services Division of SED and the Customer Service Call Center and Construction Engineering Sections of City Light to form Seattle Public Utilities. The traffic and transportation functions of the Engineering Department were consolidated in the Seattle Transportation Department.

Court Engineering, a division of the Engineering Department, provided engineering services primarily to the Law and Legislative Departments until the early 1990s. Court Engineering researched condemnation ordinances, damage suits, appeals from assessment rolls, and suits to quiet title. In the early years of the Engineering Department, Court Engineering was also responsible for surveying land for various purposes such as the Cedar River Watershed and land around Newcastle for a water reservoir. Work relating to condemnations included regrades, widening, sewers, and street extensions. As the City grew, court work related to bridges, city facilities, and arterial highways became a part of the scope of their work. Also known as the Legal Engineering Division, or the Court and Right of Way section, the division worked with City Council and Corporation Counsel to draft agreements with other governmental agencies and researched legislation pertaining to Engineering Department functions. Work also included obtaining necessary franchises and permits and assuring compliance with environmental laws.

From the guide to the Court Engineering Records, 1890-1982, (Seattle Municipal Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Third Avenue Repaving Photograph Album, 1923-1929 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Safety Photographs, 1947-1987 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Duwamish and Green Rivers Flood Control Studies, 1922-1956 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Street Trees and Landscaping Records, 1957-2001, 1966-1996 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Vehicles and Equipment Photograph Albums, 1920-1952 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Local Climatological Monthly Summary, 1951-1983 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Engineering Department Damage Cases, 1891-2003, 1914-1987 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Court Engineering Records, 1890-1982 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Meteorological Summaries, 1908-1951 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Utility Franchise Records, 1896-1983, 1908-1973 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Weather Data, 1892-1983 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Lake Washington Floating Bridge Construction Album, 1939-1940 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle Engineering Department Annual Reports, 1899-1989 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Engineering Department Negatives, 1910-1994 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Bridges Photograph Album, 1910-1932 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Engineering Department Property Ownership Lists and Abstracts, 1891-1904 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf West Seattle Freeway Bridge Construction Photographs and Slides, 1980-1983 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Engineering Department Strategic Action Plan Task Force Records, 1995-1996 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Denny Hill Regrade Photograph Albums, 1904-1929 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Engineering Department R.H. Thomson Freeway Records, 1958-1977 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Mayors' Portraits, 1869-2004 Seattle Municipal Archives
creatorOf Lake City Sewer District Records, 1949-1975 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Traffic Engineering Subject Files, 1926-1988 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Neighborhood Street Fund Records, 1994-2000, 1995-1998 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle Engineering Department Unrecorded Subject Files, 1890-1990 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Wesley C. (Wes) Uhlman Mayoral Records, 1956-1978, 1970-1977 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Seattle Law Department Condemnation Files, 1897-1982, 1901-1981 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
referencedIn Records of the Office of the Mayor, 1956-1970 City of Seattle SeattleMunicipal Archives
creatorOf Seattle (Wash.). Engineering Dept. Engineering Department Annual Reports, 1899-1985. Seattle Municipal Archives
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Black, Marvin E. person
associatedWith Bollong, J. W. A. Arch person
associatedWith Clark, Jerry D. person
associatedWith Lake City Sewer District (Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Morse, Roy W. person
associatedWith Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle corporateBody
associatedWith National Climatic Data Center (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Pike Place Market (Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle Chamber of Commerce corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle City Light corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle Housing Authority corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle Transit System corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Board of Public Works corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). City Clerk corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). City Engineer corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Community Development corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Neighborhoods corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Parks and Recreation corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Public Utilities corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Dept. of Streets and Sewers corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.) Engineering Department corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Law Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Mayor corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Refuse Destructor No. 1. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Traffic Division. corporateBody
associatedWith Seattle (Wash.). Water Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Weather Bureau corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Work Projects Administration. State of Washington corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Works Progress Administration. corporateBody
associatedWith Washington (State). Dept. of Transportation corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.).
Green River (King County, Wash.)
Lake Washington Bridge (Mercer Island and Seattle, Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
West Seattle Bridge (Seattle, Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Duwamish River (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Denny Hill (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Cedar River (King County, Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Interstate 5
Denny Regrade (Seattle, Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Duwamish River (Wash.)
Third Avenue (Seattle, Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Seattle (Wash.)
Subject
Washington (State)
Urban landscape architecture--Washington (State)--Seattle
Sewer districts--Washington (State)--Seattle
Government and Politics
Traffic accidents
Construction equipment--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Landslides--Washington (State)--Seattle
Environmental Conditions
Rainfall frequencies--Washington (State)--Seattle
Business enterprises--Washington (State)--Seattle
Award presentations--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
traffic engineering
Municipal engineering--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Public works
Streetscapes (Urban design)--Washington (State)--Seattle
Footbridges--Washington (State)--Seattle
Sewage
Bridges
Monorail railroads--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Bridges--Design and construction--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Bus lanes--Washington (State)--Seattle
Sewerage--Washington (State)--Seattle
Sewers--Washington (State)--Seattle
R.H. Thomson Freeway (Seattle, Wash.)
Tunnels--Washington (State)--Seattle
Traffic accidents--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Weyerhaeuser Timber Company
Truck farmers--Washington--Seattle
Litigation
Public Utilities
Refuse and refuse disposal--Washington (State)--Seattle
Municipal engineering
Bridges--Washington (State)--Seattle
Environmental protection--Washington (State)--Seattle
Safety--Washington (State)--Seattle
Trees in cities--Washington (State)--Seattle
Bridge construction--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Floods--Washington (State)--King County
Civil Procedure and Courts
Union Bay (Wash.)
Photographs
Public works--Washington (State)--Seattle
Sewerage
Transportation
Forward Thrust (Seattle, Wash.)
Maps
Refuse disposal facilities
Bridges--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Automobiles--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Municipal water supply--Washington (State)--Seattle
Municipal franchises--Washington (State)--Seattle
Maintenance--Equipment and supplies--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Administrative agencies Reorganization
Traffic safety--Washington (State)--Seattle
Traffic circles--Washington (State)--Seattle
Weyerhaeuser Company
Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash.)
Markets--Washington (State)--Seattle
Parks and Playgrounds
Pickup trucks--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Railroads--Washington (State)--Seattle
Waste minimization
Aurora Avenue (Seattle and Shoreline, Wash.)
Streets
Soils--Testing--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Business planning--Washington (State)--Seattle
Dump trucks--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Flood control--Washington (State)--Duwamish River
Strategic planning--Washington (State)--Seattle
Pipelines--Washington (State)--King County
Land tenure--Washington (State)--Seattle
Recycling (waste, etc.)
Sea-walls--Design and construction
Seattle
Viaducts--Design and construction--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Construction--Washington (State)--Seattle
Municipal water supply
Flood control--Planning--Washington (State)--Duwamish River
Weather
Sewage disposal plants--Washington (State)--Seattle
Storm sewers--Washington (State)--Seattle
Real property--Washington (State)--Seattle
Tolt River Watershed (Wash.)
Express highways--Washington (State)--Seattle
Washington Park Arboretum
Atmospheric temperature
Transportation--Planning--Washington (State)--Seattle
Civil defense--Washington (State)--Seattle
Alaskan Way Viaduct (Seattle, Wash.)
Monorail railroads--Washington (State)--Seattle
Grading (Earthwork)--Washington (State)--Seattle
Water and Water Rights
Lake Washington Ship Canal (Seattle, Wash.)
Precipitation (Meteorology)--Washington (State)--Seattle
Streets--Washington (State)--Seattle
Roads--Washington (State)--Seattle
Municipal engineering--Washington (State)--Seattle
Cedar River Watershed (King County, Wash.)
Viaducts--Washington (State)--Seattle
Rain and rainfall--Washington (State)--Seattle
Traffic engineering--Washington (State)--Seattle
Public utilities--Washington (State)--Seattle
City planning
Occupation
Mayors--Washington (State)--Seattle
Women mayors--Washington (State)--Seattle
Municipal engineers--Washington (State)--Seattle
Construction workers--Washington (State)--Seattle--Photographs
Activity

Corporate Body

Active 1899

Active 1985

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