De Mille, Agnes

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Agnes George de Mille was born in New York City, September 18, 1905, daughter of film producer, William de Mille and Anna (George) de Mille, daughter of economist Henry George. When Agnes was nine years old the family moved to Hollywood where her uncle, Cecil B. de Mille, was a motion picture director. Agnes entered university at age sixteen graduating from the University of California, Los Angeles, with a degree in English. Although she began dancing in her early teens, it was not until after her graduation from college that she seriously considered dancing as a career. She studied with Theodore Koslov, Marie Rambert, Antony Tudor, and Tamara Karasvina, becoming a proficient ballet dancer. In 1925 her parents divorced and she and her sister, Margaret, moved back to New York with their mother. De Mille's first New York performance was in MacKlin Marow's production of Mozart's La Finta Giardiniera in 1927. She choreographed productions through the early 1930s, returning to Hollywood in 1934 to participate in Cecil B. de Mille's Cleopatra, from which she withdrew after differences arose over the dances. De Mille spent the 1937-38 season in England helping to form a ballet troupe in Oxford and choreographing Cole Porter's The Nymph Errant starring Gertrude Lawrence. She staged dances for Leslie Howard's Hamlet (1936), Ed Wynn's Hooray for What?(1937), Swingin' the Dream (1939), and a jazz version of A Midsummer's Night Dream. In 1939 she joined the New York Ballet Theatre as choreographer and performer. During her first season she choreographed Black Ritual, the first ballet of a classical American ballet company to be danced by all black dancers. She then established a company of her own and began a national tour. In 1941, de Mille devised a scenario for Rodeo for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo which was presented in 1942. In 1943 she did the choreography for Richard Rodgers/Oscar Hammerstein's hit musical Oklahoma!. She was one of the first women choreographers to work on Broadway doing the choreography for One Touch of Venus (1943), Bloomer Girl (1944), Carousel (1945), Brigadoon (1947), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1949), and Paint Your Wagon (1951). De Mille also published articles on dance and several books. These include two autobiographical works: Dance to the Piper (1952), and Promenade Home (1958), To A Young Dancer (1960), The Book of Dance (1963), Lizzie Borden: A Dance of Death (1968), The Dance in America (1971), and Speak to Me, Dance With Me (1973). Despite a stroke and heart attack in the mid 1970s, de Mille continued her writing, publishing two memoirs, Where the Wings Grow (1978) and Reprieve (1981). She also choreographed the ballets The Informer (1988) and The Other (1992).

Agnes de Mille combined American folk dances and American music into classic art and was an innovator in dance who transformed the world of musical comedy forever. She received many awards including twelve honorary degrees, the Antoinette Perry (Tony) Award for best choreography (1947 and 1962), Theatre Hall of Fame (1973), Handel Medallion (1976), John F. Kennedy Center Career Achievement Award (1980), and the National Medal of the Arts (1986).

On June 14, 1943 Agnes de Mille married Walter Foy Prude. They had one son, Jonathan.

She died October 7, 1993 in Manhattan at the age of 88.

From the guide to the Agnes De Mille Papers MS 46., 1908-1993, (Sophia Smith Collection)

Biography

De Mille was born in 1908 or 1905 in New York City, New York; AB, UC Berkeley; studied dancing in London with Theodore Koslov, Marie Rambert, and Anthony Tudor; in 1928 appeared as a dancer in the Grand street follies, creating the choreography for a revival of the Black crook in Hoboken the following year; danced and choreographed in London before returning to New York to develop the dances for Hooray for What! (1937) and Swingin' the Dream (1939); became known for popularizing modern ballet styles in musical theater; choreographed Oklahoma! (1943), Carousel (1945), Brigadoon (1947), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1949), Paint Your Wagon (1951), and Come Summer (1969); published works include Dance to the Piper (1952), And Promenade Home (1957), Speak to Me, Dance with Me (1973), and Martha: The Life and Work of Martha Graham (c1991).

From the guide to the Agnes De Mille Papers, ca. 1990-1991, (University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.)

Agnes George de Mille, dancer, choreographer, writer and spokesperson for the arts, was born September 18, 1905 in New York. She was the daughter of playwright William Churchill de Mille (1879?-1955) and Anna George de Mille (1878-1947), who was in turn the daughter of writer and single-tax advocate, Henry George (1839-1897). Agnes' uncle was the film producer/director, Cecil B. de Mille (1881-1959). She had a younger sister, Margaret (1908-1978).

In 1914, the de Milles moved to Hollywood where William was joining forces with Cecil in the motion picture industry. Agnes attended the Hollywood School for Girls, graduating in 1922, and went on to graduate from University of California in 1926 with a degree in English. William and Anna separated that year, being divorced in 1927, and Agnes spent that summer after graduating traveling in western Europe with her mother and sister. William married Clara Beranger, a colleague in the movie industry, in 1928 and lived with her in California for the remainder of his life.

Agnes' formal dance training did not begin until early adolescence in California with Theodore Kosloff. She did some performing in college shows although she did not train continuously during her college years. Soon after graduating, she began to give solo recitals and later with Warren Leonard in her own works. Her mother helped her produce these and accompanied her to concerts in various cities in the United States and in Europe. During this period, she settled once again in New York, at first living with her mother and sister, and then on her own.

Agnes moved to England in 1932 where she continued her dance training in ballet with Marie Rambert. She performed in her own work and those of her peers such as Antony Tudor under the auspices of Rambert.

Upon her permanent return to New York ca. 1939, she met Walter Prude (1909-) through Martha Graham who was under Prude's management. Agnes and Walter were married on June 14, 1943, in Hobbs, New Mexico during the time when Prude was in military service. The two were separated-except for infrequent visits-due to the war until 1945. Their son, Jonathan de Mille Prude, was born in 1946.

It was in this time in the early 1940's that de Mille's work as a choreographer began to be recognized in the United States. Her ballet “Rodeo” in 1942, created for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, brought her immediate acclaim and popularity as did her choreography for the Broadway show “Oklahoma!” the following year. She worked steadily for the next two decades both on Broadway and in the ballet, creating over a dozen works in each field. She had a long-enduring relationship with Ballet Theatre (American Ballet Theatre) and The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, for whom she created many of her ballets.

In 1953 she formed the Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre (Heritage Dance Theatre), which functioned most actively in 1953-1954 and 1973-1975. She strove to represent in its repertoire indigenious American dance forms by native choreographers and composers as well as folk forms.

On the eve of a major New York performance of her company in her lecture/performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” she suffered a serious cerebral hemorrhage. From the day of the stroke, May 15, 1975, onward, she has remained partially paralyzed on the right side of her body although she recovered from some of the other initial losses of her faculties. On November 9, 1977, she went on stage to realize the performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” and resumed an active, if limited, life in dance.

Agnes de Mille has long been a dominant figure in dance and the arts-as a creator as well as a spokesperson and writer. Before and since her appointment as a founding member of the National Council for the Arts in 1965, she took the cause of dance and the arts to millions of readers and viewers, hundreds of organizations and political conventions. She continues to do so.

In 1980, Agnes de Mille received the Kennedy Center Award - the highest nonmilitary award in the United States.

From the guide to the Agnes de Mille papers, 1926-1975, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

Agnes George de Mille, dancer, choreographer, writer and spokesperson for the arts, was born September 18, 1905 in New York. She was the daughter of playwright William Churchill de Mille (1879?-1955) and Anna George de Mille (1878-1947), who was in turn the daughter of writer and single-tax advocate, Henry George (1839-1897). Agnes' uncle was the film producer/director, Cecil B. de Mille (1881-1959). She had a younger sister, Margaret (1908-1978).

In 1914, the de Milles moved to Hollywood where William was joining forces with Cecil in the motion picture industry. Agnes attended the Hollywood School for Girls, graduating in 1922, and went on to graduate from University of California in 1926 with a degree in English. William and Anna separated that year, being divorced in 1927, and Agnes spent that summer after graduating traveling in western Europe with her mother and sister. William married Clara Beranger, a colleague in the movie industry, in 1928 and lived with her in California for the remainder of his life.

Agnes' formal dance training did not begin until early adolescence in California with Theodore Kosloff. She did some performing in college shows although she did not train continuously during her college years. Soon after graduating, she began to give solo recitals and later with Warren Leonard in her own works. Her mother helped her produce these and accompanied her to concerts in various cities in the United States and in Europe. During this period, she settled once again in New York, at first living with her mother and sister, and then on her own.

Agnes moved to England in 1932 where she continued her dance training in ballet with Marie Rambert. She performed in her own work and those of her peers such as Antony Tudor under the auspices of Rambert.

Upon her permanent return to New York ca. 1939, she met Walter Prude (1909-) through Martha Graham who was under Prude's management. Agnes and Walter were married on June 14, 1943, in Hobbs, New Mexico during the time when Prude was in military service. The two were separated-except for infrequent visits-due to the war until 1945. Their son, Jonathan de Mille Prude, was born in 1946.

It was in this time in the early 1940's that de Mille's work as a choreographer began to be recognized in the United States. Her ballet “Rodeo” in 1942, created for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, brought her immediate acclaim and popularity as did her choreography for the Broadway show “Oklahoma!” the following year. She worked steadily for the next two decades both on Broadway and in the ballet, creating over a dozen works in each field. She had a long-enduring relationship with Ballet Theatre (American Ballet Theatre) and The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, for whom she created many of her ballets.

In 1953 she formed the Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre (Heritage Dance Theatre), which functioned most actively in 1953-1954 and 1973-1975. She strove to represent in its repertoire indigenious American dance forms by native choreographers and composers as well as folk forms.

On the eve of a major New York performance of her company in her lecture/performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” she suffered a serious cerebral hemorrhage. From the day of the stroke, May 15, 1975, onward, she has remained partially paralyzed on the right side of her body although she recovered from some of the other initial losses of her faculties. On November 9, 1977, she went on stage to realize the performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” and resumed an active, if limited, life in dance.

Agnes de Mille has long been a dominant figure in dance and the arts-as a creator as well as a spokesperson and writer. Before and since her appointment as a founding member of the National Council for the Arts in 1965, she took the cause of dance and the arts to millions of readers and viewers, hundreds of organizations and political conventions. She continues to do so.

In 1980, Agnes de Mille received the Kennedy Center Award - the highest nonmilitary award in the United States.

From the guide to the Agnes de Mille honors and awards, 1977-1992, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

Agnes George de Mille, dancer, choreographer, writer and spokesperson for the arts, was born September 18, 1905 in New York. She was the daughter of playwright William Churchill de Mille (1879?-1955) and Anna George de Mille (1878-1947), who was in turn the daughter of writer and single-tax advocate, Henry George (1839-1897). Agnes' uncle was the film producer/director, Cecil B. de Mille (1881-1959). She had a younger sister, Margaret (1908-1978).

In 1914, the de Milles moved to Hollywood where William was joining forces with Cecil in the motion picture industry. Agnes attended the Hollywood School for Girls, graduating in 1922, and went on to graduate from University of California in 1926 with a degree in English. William and Anna separated that year, being divorced in 1927, and Agnes spent that summer after graduating traveling in western Europe with her mother and sister. William married Clara Beranger, a colleague in the movie industry, in 1928 and lived with her in California for the remainder of his life.

Agnes' formal dance training did not begin until early adolescence in California with Theodore Kosloff. She did some performing in college shows although she did not train continuously during her college years. Soon after graduating, she began to give solo recitals and later with Warren Leonard in her own works. Her mother helped her produce these and accompanied her to concerts in various cities in the United States and in Europe. During this period, she settled once again in New York, at first living with her mother and sister, and then on her own.

Agnes moved to England in 1932 where she continued her dance training in ballet with Marie Rambert. She performed in her own work and those of her peers such as Antony Tudor under the auspices of Rambert.

Upon her permanent return to New York ca. 1939, she met Walter Prude (1909-) through Martha Graham who was under Prude's management. Agnes and Walter were married on June 14, 1943, in Hobbs, New Mexico during the time when Prude was in military service. The two were separated-except for infrequent visits-due to the war until 1945. Their son, Jonathan de Mille Prude, was born in 1946.

It was in this time in the early 1940's that de Mille's work as a choreographer began to be recognized in the United States. Her ballet “Rodeo” in 1942, created for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, brought her immediate acclaim and popularity as did her choreography for the Broadway show “Oklahoma!” the following year. She worked steadily for the next two decades both on Broadway and in the ballet, creating over a dozen works in each field. She had a long-enduring relationship with Ballet Theatre (American Ballet Theatre) and The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, for whom she created many of her ballets.

In 1953 she formed the Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre (Heritage Dance Theatre), which functioned most actively in 1953-1954 and 1973-1975. She strove to represent in its repertoire indigenious American dance forms by native choreographers and composers as well as folk forms.

On the eve of a major New York performance of her company in her lecture/performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” she suffered a serious cerebral hemorrhage. From the day of the stroke, May 15, 1975, onward, she has remained partially paralyzed on the right side of her body although she recovered from some of the other initial losses of her faculties. On November 9, 1977, she went on stage to realize the performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” and resumed an active, if limited, life in dance.

Agnes de Mille has long been a dominant figure in dance and the arts-as a creator as well as a spokesperson and writer. Before and since her appointment as a founding member of the National Council for the Arts in 1965, she took the cause of dance and the arts to millions of readers and viewers, hundreds of organizations and political conventions. She continues to do so.

In 1980, Agnes de Mille received the Kennedy Center Award - the highest nonmilitary award in the United States.

From the guide to the Agnes de Mille correspondence and writings, 1871-1993, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

Agnes George de Mille, dancer, choreographer, writer and spokesperson for the arts, was born September 18, 1905 in New York. She was the daughter of playwright William Churchill de Mille (1879?-1955) and Anna George de Mille (1878-1947), who was in turn the daughter of writer and single-tax advocate, Henry George (1839-1897). Agnes' uncle was the film producer/director, Cecil B. de Mille (1881-1959). She had a younger sister, Margaret (1908-1978).

In 1914, the de Milles moved to Hollywood where William was joining forces with Cecil in the motion picture industry. Agnes attended the Hollywood School for Girls, graduating in 1922, and went on to graduate from University of California in 1926 with a degree in English. William and Anna separated that year, being divorced in 1927, and Agnes spent that summer after graduating traveling in western Europe with her mother and sister. William married Clara Beranger, a colleague in the movie industry, in 1928 and lived with her in California for the remainder of his life.

Agnes' formal dance training did not begin until early adolescence in California with Theodore Kosloff. She did some performing in college shows although she did not train continuously during her college years. Soon after graduating, she began to give solo recitals and later with Warren Leonard in her own works. Her mother helped her produce these and accompanied her to concerts in various cities in the United States and in Europe. During this period, she settled once again in New York, at first living with her mother and sister, and then on her own.

Agnes moved to England in 1932 where she continued her dance training in ballet with Marie Rambert. She performed in her own work and those of her peers such as Antony Tudor under the auspices of Rambert.

Upon her permanent return to New York ca. 1939, she met Walter Prude (1909-) through Martha Graham who was under Prude's management. Agnes and Walter were married on June 14, 1943, in Hobbs, New Mexico during the time when Prude was in military service. The two were separated-except for infrequent visitsdue to the war until 1945. Their son, Jonathan de Mille Prude, was born in 1946.

It was in this time in the early 1940's that de Mille's work as a choreographer began to be recognized in the United States. Her ballet “Rodeo” in 1942, created for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, brought her immediate acclaim and popularity as did her choreography for the Broadway show “Oklahoma!” the following year. She worked steadily for the next two decades both on Broadway and in the ballet, creating over a dozen works in each field. She had a long-enduring relationship with Ballet Theatre (American Ballet Theatre) and The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, for whom she created many of her ballets.

In 1953 she formed the Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre (Heritage Dance Theatre), which functioned most actively in 1953-1954 and 1973-1975. She strove to represent in its repertoire indigenious American dance forms by native choreographers and composers as well as folk forms.

On the eve of a major New York performance of her company in her lecture/performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” she suffered a serious cerebral hemorrhage. From the day of the stroke, May 15, 1975, onward, she has remained partially paralyzed on the right side of her body although she recovered from some of the other initial losses of her faculties. On November 9, 1977, she went on stage to realize the performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” and resumed an active, if limited, life in dance.

Agnes de Mille has long been a dominant figure in dance and the arts-as a creator as well as a spokesperson and writer. Before and since her appointment as a founding member of the National Council for the Arts in 1965, she took the cause of dance and the arts to millions of readers and viewers, hundreds of organizations and political conventions. She continues to do so.

In 1980, Agnes de Mille received the Kennedy Center Award - the highest nonmilitary award in the United States.

From the guide to the Agnes de Mille collection, circa 1914-1984, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

Agnes George de Mille, dancer, choreographer, writer and spokesperson for the arts, was born September 18, 1905 in New York. She was the daughter of playwright William Churchill de Mille (1879?-1955) and Anna George de Mille (1878-1947), who was in turn the daughter of writer and single-tax advocate, Henry George (1839-1897). Agnes' uncle was the film producer/director, Cecil B. de Mille (1881-1959). She had a younger sister, Margaret (1908-1978).

In 1914, the de Milles moved to Hollywood where William was joining forces with Cecil in the motion picture industry. Agnes attended the Hollywood School for Girls, graduating in 1922, and went on to graduate from University of California in 1926 with a degree in English. William and Anna separated that year, being divorced in 1927, and Agnes spent that summer after graduating traveling in western Europe with her mother and sister. William married Clara Beranger, a colleague in the movie industry, in 1928 and lived with her in California for the remainder of his life.

Agnes' formal dance training did not begin until early adolescence in California with Theodore Kosloff. She did some performing in college shows although she did not train continuously during her college years. Soon after graduating, she began to give solo recitals and later with Warren Leonard in her own works. Her mother helped her produce these and accompanied her to concerts in various cities in the United States and in Europe. During this period, she settled once again in New York, at first living with her mother and sister, and then on her own.

Agnes moved to England in 1932 where she continued her dance training in ballet with Marie Rambert. She performed in her own work and those of her peers such as Antony Tudor under the auspices of Rambert.

Upon her permanent return to New York ca. 1939, she met Walter Prude (1909-) through Martha Graham who was under Prude's management. Agnes and Walter were married on June 14, 1943, in Hobbs, New Mexico during the time when Prude was in military service. The two were separated-except for infrequent visits-due to the war until 1945. Their son, Jonathan de Mille Prude, was born in 1946.

It was in this time in the early 1940's that de Mille's work as a choreographer began to be recognized in the United States. Her ballet “Rodeo” in 1942, created for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, brought her immediate acclaim and popularity as did her choreography for the Broadway show “Oklahoma!” the following year. She worked steadily for the next two decades both on Broadway and in the ballet, creating over a dozen works in each field. She had a long-enduring relationship with Ballet Theatre (American Ballet Theatre) and The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, for whom she created many of her ballets.

In 1953 she formed the Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre (Heritage Dance Theatre), which functioned most actively in 1953-1954 and 1973-1975. She strove to represent in its repertoire indigenious American dance forms by native choreographers and composers as well as folk forms.

On the eve of a major New York performance of her company in her lecture/performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” she suffered a serious cerebral hemorrhage. From the day of the stroke, May 15, 1975, onward, she has remained partially paralyzed on the right side of her body although she recovered from some of the other initial losses of her faculties. On November 9, 1977, she went on stage to realize the performance of “Conversations About the Dance,” and resumed an active, if limited, life in dance.

Agnes de Mille has long been a dominant figure in dance and the arts-as a creator as well as a spokesperson and writer. Before and since her appointment as a founding member of the National Council for the Arts in 1965, she took the cause of dance and the arts to millions of readers and viewers, hundreds of organizations and political conventions. She continues to do so.

In 1980, Agnes de Mille received the Kennedy Center Award - the highest nonmilitary award in the United States.

From the guide to the Early drafts and papers relating to Martha: The life and work of Martha Graham, 196?-1991, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

Agnes (George) De Mille was born in New York City in 1905. She was the daughter of William Churchill De Mille, the famous playwright, and Anna George, the daughter of the distinguished economist and "single tax" advocate, Henry George. She was also the niece of filmmaker Cecil B. De Mille. She inherited a profound identification with the theater.

De Mille spent her early years in New York City at her family home at Merriewold in Sullivan County. In 1914, William De Mille summoned his family to Los Angeles where he had cast his lot with his brother, Cecil B. De Mille, in the nascent film industry. De Mille and her sister, Margaret, gave piano recitals and staged dramatic productions for their friends, but their parents refused to let Agnes take dancing lessons because of a widely-held contemporary belief that dancers were slightly disreputable. Nevertheless, De Mille had the opportunity to see a dance performance by Anna Pavlova, and that performance inspired in young Agnes the desire to become a famous dancer. Her father continued to oppose her wish for a career in dancing, but she was still allowed to take two lessons a week at the studios of Theodore Koslov.

Frustrated by her family’s indifference, De Mille gave up dancing to attend the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She graduated with a degree in English. After her parents’ divorce, she moved to New York and resumed her dancing, although she struggled to make a living in the field. Her first real dancing job came when she was hired as a dancer-choreographer for Christopher Morley’s revival of a 19th century melodrama, The Black Crook, in Hoboken. In 1932, De Mille moved to London, where she received extensive dance training at Madame Marie Rambert’s Ballet Club. She studied with, and was influenced by, fledging choreographers like Fredrick Ashton and Anthony Tudor, both of whom would later join her in her efforts to revolutionize the ballet and dance worlds. Her experience at the Ballet Club served as one of the most significant phases of her training. Throughout the 1930s, De Mille returned to the United States to take odd jobs. She danced in her uncle’s staging of Cleopatra in 1934, and she choreographed for the Leslie Howard and Norma Shearer film version of Romeo and Juliet in 1936. Most of the time, however, she battled poverty in London while trying to become a full-time choreographer.

De Mille’s career changed for the better in the late 1930s and 1940s. In 1939, she was invited to join the American Ballet Theatre’s opening season. In 1940, she created her first ballet, Black Ritual . In 1942, De Mille choreographed her ballet, Three Virgins and a Devil, for the American Ballet Theatre. The following year, she joined Rodgers and Hammerstein to create the triumphant Oklahoma!, a musical that revolutionized the art form by integrating its choreographic numbers with the plot in a way that had never before been accomplished.

De Mille went on to choreograph some of the biggest Broadway hits of the 1940s and 1950s, including One Touch of Venus in 1943, Carousel in 1945, Brigadoon in 1947, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes in 1949, and Paint Your Wagon in 1951. She also furthered her innovative style with Tally-Ho in 1944 and Fall River Legend, a haunting version of the Lizzie Borden axe-murder case, in 1948. Throughout the 1950s, De Mille embarked on a variety of projects. In 1952, she published the first volume of her autobiography, Dance to the Piper . The following year, she founded the Agnes De Mille Theater and toured with it in 126 cities during 1953 and 1954. In 1955, she choreographed the numbers for a film version of Oklahoma! During the 1960s, De Mille continued to produce many memorable ballets, including The Bitter Weird in 1962, The Wind in the Mountains in 1965, and The Golden Age in 1967. She also published several more dance books, such as To a Young Dancer in 1962, The Book of the Dance in 1963, and Lizzie Borden Dance of Death in 1968. From 1973 to 1974, De Mille founded and toured with the Agnes De Mille Heritage Dance Theater. She suffered a stroke in 1975, but fought her way back to health in time to receive the Handel Medallion, New York’s highest award for achievement in the arts, in 1976. De Mille continued to be involved very actively with artistic endeavors up until her death in October 1993.

From the guide to the Agnes De Mille scores, 1865-1993, 1940-1988, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn Adolf Bolm Papers, 1884-1951 Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries
referencedIn Rebecca West papers, 1894-1975 Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Agnes de Mille papers, 1926-1975 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Morton Gould Papers, 1920-1996, (bulk 1937-1995) Music Division Library of Congress
referencedIn Leonard Warren papers, 1938-1963 The New York Public Library. Music Division.
referencedIn Cheryl Crawford papers, 1920-1986 The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.
creatorOf Martha : the life and work of Martha Graham / by Agnes de Mille, 198-? The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
creatorOf Agnes De Mille scores, 1865-1993, 1940-1988 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Martin Kamin Papers, 1789-1973 Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries
referencedIn American Ballet Theatre records, 1936-ca. 1967 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Richard Rodgers collection of musicals and interviews [sound recording], 1926-1980 The New York Public Library. Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound.
referencedIn Philippe Halsman theatrical photographs, 1947-1969 The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.
referencedIn Papers, 1922-1987 Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute
referencedIn The Harold Rome Papers, 1873-1988 (inclusive) Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University
creatorOf Early drafts and papers relating to Martha: The life and work of Martha Graham, 196?-1991 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
creatorOf Agnes de Mille correspondence and writings, 1871-1993 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Trude Rittman scores, ca. 1934-ca. 1975 The New York Public Library. Music Division.
referencedIn Stravinsky-Diaghilev Foundation research files, 1920-1989. Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University.
referencedIn Jo Mielziner papers, 1903-1976 The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.
creatorOf Agnes De Mille Papers, ca. 1990-1991 University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.
creatorOf Agnes de Mille collection, circa 1914-1984 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
creatorOf Agnes de Mille honors and awards, 1977-1992 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Barbara Barker papers, ca. 1833-1998 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Helene Obolensky papers, 1910-1994, 1976-1984 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Jerome Moross Papers, 1924-2000 Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
referencedIn Timeline Films videotape collection, approximately 1915-1997 L. Tom Perry Special CollectionsMotion Picture Archive
referencedIn Papers, 1874-1945 Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute
referencedIn José Limón papers, ca. 1927-1972 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Stella Bloch papers, 1914-1991. Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University.
referencedIn Theatre Arts Monthly, collection of portraits, ca., ca., 1924-1939 (bulk), 1916-1964 (inclusive). Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University.
referencedIn Jerome Robbins personal papers, 1896-2000 and undated, 1931-1998, dates The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Register to the Papers of Kurt Weill and Lotte Lenya, 1890-1984, inclusive Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University
referencedIn E. E. Cummings papers, 1870-1969. Houghton Library.
referencedIn E. E. Cummings additional papers, 1870-1969. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Lincoln Kirstein papers, ca. 1914-1991 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn Irving Deakin correspondence, 1934-1955 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
referencedIn The Virgil Thomson Papers, 1804-1990 (inclusive) Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University
referencedIn Parmenia Migel papers, 1945-1990. Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University.
referencedIn William Schuman papers and records, 1933-1986 The New York Public Library. Music Division.
creatorOf Agnes De Mille Papers MS 46., 1908-1993 Sophia Smith Collection
referencedIn Walter Terry papers, 1913-1982 The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre corporateBody
associatedWith American Ballet Theatre corporateBody
associatedWith Barker, Barbara M., 1938- person
associatedWith Berman, Eugene, 1899- person
associatedWith Bloch, Stella. person
associatedWith Bolm, Adolf, 1894-1951 person
associatedWith Chase, Lucia, 1897-1986 person
associatedWith Coward, Noel, 1899-1973 person
associatedWith Crawford, Cheryl, 1902-1986 person
correspondedWith Cummings, E. E. (Edward Estlin), 1894-1962 person
associatedWith Deakin, Irving person
associatedWith de Mille person
associatedWith De Mille, Cecil B., (Cecil Blount), 1881-1959 person
associatedWith De Mille family family
associatedWith DeMille family family
associatedWith de Mille's person
associatedWith Dorothy (Feiner) Rodgers, 1909- person
associatedWith George, Henry, 1839-1897 person
associatedWith George, Henry, 1862-1916 person
correspondedWith Gould, Morton, 1913-1996 person
associatedWith Graham, Horst person
associatedWith Graham, Martha person
associatedWith Green, Mary, 1910-1992 person
associatedWith Halsman, Philippe person
associatedWith Harold Rome person
associatedWith Horner, Therese Langfield person
associatedWith Hurst, Fannie, 1889-1968 person
associatedWith June Hamilton Rhodes Gordon person
associatedWith Kamin, Martin. person
associatedWith Kate Medina person
associatedWith Kirstein, Lincoln, 1907- person
associatedWith Lankes, Hans Christian person
associatedWith Lawrence, Gertrude person
associatedWith Lenya, Lotte person
associatedWith Limón, José person
associatedWith Maracci, Carmelita, 1911-1987 person
associatedWith Martha Graham Dance Company corporateBody
associatedWith MARY (WARE) DENNETT person
associatedWith Medina, Kate person
associatedWith Menzies, Michael person
associatedWith Mielziner, Jo, 1901-1976 person
correspondedWith Migel, Parmenia. person
associatedWith Millay, Edna St. Vincent, 1892-1950 person
associatedWith Mitchell, James, 1920- person
associatedWith Moross, Jerome, 1913-1983 person
associatedWith Obolensky, Helene person
associatedWith Rhodes, June Hamilton person
associatedWith Rittman, Trude person
associatedWith Robbins, Jerome person
associatedWith Rodgers, Richard, 1902-1979 person
associatedWith Schuman, William, 1910-1992 person
associatedWith Shawn, Ted, 1891-1972 person
associatedWith Smith, Oliver Lemuel, 1918-1994 person
associatedWith St. Denis person
associatedWith St. Denis, Ruth, 1880-1968 person
associatedWith Stravinsky-Diaghilev Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Ted Shawn person
correspondedWith Terry, Walter person
associatedWith Thomson, Virgil, 1896- person
associatedWith Timeline Films corporateBody
associatedWith Uramatsu, Fukio person
associatedWith Warren, Leonard, 1911-1960 person
associatedWith Weill, Kurt, 1900-1950 person
associatedWith West, Rebecca, Dame, 1892- person
associatedWith Windreich, Leland person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Europe
Subject
Ballet--United States--History--20th century--Sources
Dancers--United States--Archival resources
Dancers
Choreographers--United States--Biography
Medals
Performing arts--History--20th century--Sources
Choreographers--United States--History--20th century--Sources
Women choreographers
Dancers--United States--Biography
Manuscripts--Collections
Dancers--United States--History--20th century--Sources
Manuscripts (Books)
Awards and honors
Chroeographers--United States
Dancers--United States--20th century
Choreographers--United States--Archival resources
Theater--History--20th century--Sources
Dance--History--20th century--Sources
Occupation
Performer
Choreographer
Women dancers
Function

Person

Information

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Ark ID: w6tc38xm

SNAC ID: 59370619