Boston women's health book collective

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The Boston Women's Health Book Collective is a nonprofit, public interest women's health education, advocacy, and consulting organization which was formally established in 1972 and published Our Bodies, Ourselves in 1973.

From the description of Subject files, 1970-1998. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 83027952

The Boston Women's Health Book Collective, a non-profit women's health education, advocacy and consulting organization, began in 1969 when a small group of women gathered after a workshop on women and their bodies at a Boston-area female liberation conference to talk about some crucial health issues and to confront a medical establishment viewed as paternalistic and condescending. Perhaps best known for their pioneering handbook Our Bodies, Ourselves (1971 and subsequent editions and international adaptations), the Collective helped to create worldwide networks of women involved in health education and advocacy. They also produced Ourselves and Our Children (1978), Changing Bodies, Changing Lives, A Book for Teens on Sex and Relationships (1980), and Ourselves, Growing Older, Women Aging with Knowledge and Power (1987 and 1994), among others.

From the description of Audiotape collection of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1973-2000 [sound recording]. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 754366080

From the description of Additional records of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1966-2010. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 712905940

The Boston Women's Health Book Collective, a non-profit women's health education, advocacy and consulting organization, began in 1969 when a small group of women gathered after a workshop on women and their bodies at a Boston-area female liberation conference to talk about some crucial health issues and to confront a medical establishment viewed as paternalistic and condescending. Perhaps best known for their pioneering handbook Our Bodies, Ourselves (1971 and subsequent editions and international adaptations), the Collective helped to create worldwide networks of women involved in health education and advocacy. They also produced Ourselves and Our Children (1978), Changing Bodies, Changing Lives, A Book for Teens on Sex and Relationships (1980), and Ourselves, Growing Older: Women Aging with Knowledge and Power (1987 and 1994), among others.

From the guide to the Audiotape collection of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1973-2000, (Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute)

The Boston Women's Health Book Collective began in 1969 when a small group of women gathered after a workshop on women and their bodies at a Boston-area female liberation conference to talk about some crucial health issues and to confront a medical establishment viewed as paternalistic and condescending. Perhaps best known for their pioneering handbook Our Bodies, Ourselves (1971 and subsequent editions and international adaptations), the Collective helped to create worldwide networks of women involved in health education and advocacy. They also produced Ourselves and Our Children (1978), Changing Bodies, Changing Lives, A Book for Teens on Sex and Relationships (1980), and Ourselves, Growing Older, Women Aging with Knowledge and Power (1987 and 1994), among others.

From the description of Records, 1905-2003 (inclusive), 1972-1997 (bulk). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122387367

In the spring of 1969, civil rights and anti-war activist and social worker Nancy Miriam Hawley led a workshop on women and their bodies at a Boston-area female liberation conference. The issues raised--particularly abortion (illegal at the time), childbirth, and sexuality--were so provocative to some of the women that they began a discussion that has lasted a lifetime, and spread throughout the world. At first calling themselves the Doctor's Group, the women began meeting to share information about obstetricians and gynecologists. They developed a questionnaire about women's feelings about their bodies and their relationship to doctors. Describing their beginnings in Women and Their Bodies: A Course (1970), the group wrote: "We discovered there were no 'good' doctors and we had to learn for ourselves. We talked about our own experiences and we shared our own knowledge. We went to books and to medically trained people for more information. We decided on the topics collectively....We picked the one or ones we wanted to do and worked individually and in groups to write the papers. The process that developed in the group became as important as the material we were learning. For the first time, we were doing research and writing papers that were about us and for us. We were excited and our excitement was powerful. We wanted to share both the excitement and the material we were learning with our sisters. We saw ourselves differently and our lives began to change."

They met throughout the summer of 1969, shared their research, and rewrote papers in response to each other's comments. In November, they offered a course to other interested women and taught others how to teach the course themselves. The group's description continued: "After the first time around, those of us who had worked out the course originally, plus women who had taken the course, got together in an enlarged group to rewrite the papers so they could be printed and shared, not only with women in Boston, but with women's groups across the country. Other women wanted to learn, other women's health groups wanted to compare and combine our work and theirs." The group spent a year revising the papers before having them issued on newsprint in December 1970 by the New England Free Press. They clearly state, however, that the papers "are not final. They are not static. They are meant to be used by our sisters to increase consciousness about ourselves as women, to build our movement, to begin to struggle collectively for adequate health care, and in many other ways they can be useful to you." They also stressed one of their key tenets: that process was as important as content. "It was exciting to learn new facts about our bodies, but it was even more exciting to talk about how we felt about our bodies, how we felt about ourselves, how we could become more autonomous human beings, how we could act together on our collective knowledge to change the health care system for women and for all people." They concluded that the course was not a finished product, but must continue to be revised and expanded: "The course will be best changed by the corrections and additions sent by those who use it."

During the first year and a half, there was some turnover in the group's composition, as well as in their name. Known variously as the Doctor's Group, Women and Their Bodies Group, Women and Our Bodies Group, Boston Women's Health Collective, Boston Women's Health Course Collective, and Our Bodies Ourselves Group, the final name was chosen when the group incorporated in 1972: the Boston Women's Health Book Collective (BWHBC). The Collective lists its founders as Ruth Davidson Bell (later Bell Alexander), Pamela Berger, Vilyuna ("Wilma") Diskin, Joan Sheingold Ditzion, Paula Brown Doress (later Paula Doress-Worters), Nancy Miriam Hawley (later Nancy Press Hawley), Elizabeth MacMahon-Herrera, Pamela Morgan, Judy Norsigian, Jane Kates Pincus, Esther R. Rome, Wendy Coppedge Sanford, Norma Swenson and Sally Whelan. Most of this group remained together for more than twenty years, sharing their personal and professional lives, producing books, pamphlets, and articles; organizing conferences on women's health in the United States and abroad; lecturing in a variety of venues throughout the world; serving on advisory boards for a wide range of organizations, from local women's health centers to national advocacy groups to scientific/medical task forces; providing information on health issues to the general public, the media, and medical personnel; creating international networks to share information; and in numerous other ways shaping and expanding the women's health movement.

The success of the newsprint version of their course (more than 200,000 were sold through counter-culture channels, especially the Whole Earth Catalog ) brought commercial publishers to their doorstep in the summer of 1971. Months of discussion ensued. After weighing all the pros and cons of using an established commercial publisher, and detailed examination of several possible publishing firms, the Collective chose Simon and Schuster. In order to sign the contract, they had to incorporate; their first meeting as the Boston Women's Health Book Collective took place January 11, 1972. According to their minutes, Wendy Sanford was designated President "because her address is used [as BWHBC address]," Esther Rome as Treasurer "because she will handle $ and sign checks," Nancy Hawley as Clerk "for no reason?" and Paula Doress as Trustee. Their contract with Simon and Schuster had several stipulations, among them that non-profit clinics and other organizations providing health counseling could purchase the books at a 70% discount to give away to low-income clients. Several hundred thousand copies of Our Bodies, Ourselves (1973) were distributed in this way.

The first book to provide information about women's health and medical issues in clear, direct language, with contributions from numerous readers about their personal experiences with health issues and the medical care system, Our Bodies, Ourselves (OBOS) was a commercial success, and has been revised and expanded numerous times (see below). Although it has been as important for raising the consciousness and level of knowledge among medical personnel as among the general public, it has not always been universally embraced. Beginning in the early 1980s, and continuing over the years, the Collective has had to fight back attempts by various conservative groups to ban the book from schools and libraries (see especially #156.6). These battles, in turn, generated further publicity. The Collective used their royalties to support other women's health projects, to eventually rent office space and open the Women's Health Information Center, and to do advocacy work. Included in the supported projects were HealthRight, a women's health quarterly published between 1976 and 1981; "Taking Our Bodies Back," a film about the women's health movement; Porcupine Women's Health Collective in Wounded Knee, South Dakota, for women's health workshops and community education; Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vidas, the U.S. Spanish language edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves, towards production and distribution costs; Women's Community Health Center, the only women-controlled health center in the Boston area (1974-1981), for operating support; the 1975 Conference on Women and Health, the first such national meeting; and the National Women's Health Network, towards printing expenses of a newsletter and production costs of nine Health Resource Guides published in 1979.

Members of the Collective have served on numerous boards, and cooperated with other organizations in a variety of outreach and advocacy efforts.

The following brief chronology for 1969-2001 is taken from several BWHBC timelines, and highlights some of their major events and accomplishments. For additional information, see Series I (History and Organization) and Series XXV (Publicity and Outreach).

  • May 1969: Nancy Miriam Hawley leads workshop on "Women and Control of Their Bodies" at Female Liberation Conference organized by Bread and Roses, Emmanuel College, Boston.
  • Summer 1969: Workshop group continues to meet, doing research on selected topics.
  • November 1969: Group offers first informal course to Boston-area women on "Women and Their Bodies" at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
  • December 1970: New England Free Press prints the research papers in a newsprint book first called Women and Their Bodies: A Course, then Women and Our Bodies: A Course in a subsequent printing, and finally the title that stuck, Our Bodies, Ourselves: A Course by and for Women. The price dropped from 75 cents to 30 cents as sales increased. Over 200,000 copies sold through non-establishment channels such as women's centers and the Whole Earth Catalog.
  • Summer 1971: Group is approached by several commercial presses.
  • 1971 - 1973 : After many meetings and discussions, Simon and Schuster is chosen to publish first commercial version of Our Bodies, Ourselves, and group works to revise all chapters.
  • January 1972: The group of eleven [or twelve?] women holds their first meeting January 11 as the newly incorporated Boston Women's Health Book Collective.
  • March 1973: Simon and Schuster publishes a thoroughly revised edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves with photographs and personal anecdotes from readers around the country.
  • 1974 - 1981 : Provides operating support for the Women's Community Health Center, the only women-controlled health center in the Boston area.
  • 1975: Co-sponsors 1975 Conference on Women and Health in the Harvard medical area, the first such national meeting, with 2500 participants.
  • March 1976: A revised and expanded edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves is published by Simon and Schuster.
  • Fall 1976: Several members begin meeting to discuss their lives as parents; this eventually leads in 1978 to a book on parenting.
  • 1976 - 1981 : The Collective distributes "Women and Health Information Packets," containing copies of health-related articles, to over 600 women's groups and educators in the U.S. and abroad.
  • Summer 1977: Two members visit ten European countries to meet with women's health activists and women involved in various foreign translations of Our Bodies, Ourselves.
  • Fall 1977: The BWHBC self-publishes Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vidas (NCNV), the U.S. Spanish language edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves.
  • October 1978: The parenting project, joined earlier by four women from outside the group, completes their research and writing; Random House publishes Ourselves and Our Children. Parenting workshops begin.
  • April 1979: The Collective holds their first weekend retreat to celebrate 10 years together.
  • Summer 1979: Collective member visits India to help with plans for Indian adaptation of Our Bodies, Ourselves, and translation into several Indian languages.
  • Fall 1979: Factual updates of both Our Bodies, Ourselves and Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vidas are published.
  • 1980: BWHBC leases space in a Watertown, Massachusetts, church cultural center in order to open Women's Health Information Center; co-publishes International Women and Health Resource Guide with ISIS (Women's International Information and Communication Service); helps to start a group that becomes Amigas Latinas en Accion Pro Salud (ALAS); and oversees publication of Changing Bodies, Changing Lives by Ruth Bell and others (Random House);
  • 1982: Publication of Talking with Your Teenager, by Ruth Bell and Lenny Wildflower (Random House).
  • 1983: Our Jobs, Our Health: A Woman's Guide to Occupational Health and Safety is co-published with the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health.
  • 1984: A thoroughly revised edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves is published as The New Our Bodies, Ourselves.
  • 1986: BWHBC moves several blocks to cultural center with handicap-accessibility and larger quarters.
  • 1987: Book on aging, Ourselves Growing Older: Women Aging with Knowledge and Power, by Paula Doress and Diana Siegal and the Midlife and Older Women's Book Project, is published by Simon and Schuster; a revised edition of Changing Bodies, Changing Lives is also published.
  • 1990: BWHBC moves to much larger space in Somerville, Massachusetts.
  • 1991: Collective joins other centers (SOS Corpo in Brazil, ISIS International in Chile, APDC in Malaysia, and CIDHAL in Mexico) to form the Women and Health Documentation Center Network for computerization and information exchange.
  • 1992: The New Our Bodies, Ourselves is updated and expanded for the 1990s.
  • 1994: The New Ourselves Growing Older is updated and published.
  • 1996: Online edition of The New Our Bodies, Ourselves is launched by HealthGate Data Corporation.
  • 1998: Update of The New Our Bodies, Ourselves print edition is published; Our Bodies, Ourselves web site goes live.
  • 2001: The Collective moves to new space in the Boston University School of Public Health; its reference collection is transferred to the Countway Library of the Harvard Medical School.

From the guide to the Records, 1905-2003 (inclusive), 1972-1997 (bulk), (Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute)

In the spring of 1969, civil rights and anti-war activist and social worker Nancy Miriam Hawley led a workshop on women and their bodies at a Boston-area female liberation conference. The issues raised--particularly abortion (illegal at the time), childbirth, and sexuality--were so provocative to some of the women that they began a discussion that has lasted a lifetime, and spread throughout the world. At first calling themselves the Doctor's Group, the women began meeting to share information about obstetricians and gynecologists. They developed a questionnaire about women's feelings about their bodies and their relationship to doctors. Describing their beginnings in Women and Their Bodies: A Course (1970), the group wrote: "We discovered there were no 'good' doctors and we had to learn for ourselves. We talked about our own experiences and we shared our own knowledge. We went to books and to medically trained people for more information. We decided on the topics collectively....We picked the one or ones we wanted to do and worked individually and in groups to write the papers. The process that developed in the group became as important as the material we were learning. For the first time, we were doing research and writing papers that were about us and for us. We were excited and our excitement was powerful. We wanted to share both the excitement and the material we were learning with our sisters. We saw ourselves differently and our lives began to change."

They met throughout the summer of 1969, shared their research, and rewrote papers in response to each other's comments. In November, they offered a course to other interested women and taught others how to teach the course themselves. The group's description continued: "After the first time around, those of us who had worked out the course originally, plus women who had taken the course, got together in an enlarged group to rewrite the papers so they could be printed and shared, not only with women in Boston, but with women's groups across the country. Other women wanted to learn, other women's health groups wanted to compare and combine our work and theirs." The group spent a year revising the papers before having them issued on newsprint in December 1970 by the New England Free Press. They clearly state, however, that the papers "are not final. They are not static. They are meant to be used by our sisters to increase consciousness about ourselves as women, to build our movement, to begin to struggle collectively for adequate health care, and in many other ways they can be useful to you." They also stressed one of their key tenets: that process was as important as content. "It was exciting to learn new facts about our bodies, but it was even more exciting to talk about how we felt about our bodies, how we felt about ourselves, how we could become more autonomous human beings, how we could act together on our collective knowledge to change the health care system for women and for all people." They concluded that the course was not a finished product, but must continue to be revised and expanded: "The course will be best changed by the corrections and additions sent by those who use it."

During the first year and a half, there was some turnover in the group's composition, as well as in their name. Known variously as the Doctor's Group, Women and Their Bodies Group, Women and Our Bodies Group, Boston Women's Health Collective, Boston Women's Health Course Collective, and Our Bodies Ourselves Group, the final name was chosen when the group incorporated in 1972: the Boston Women's Health Book Collective (Boston Women's Health Book Collective). The Collective lists its founders as Ruth Davidson Bell (later Bell Alexander), Pamela Berger, Vilyuna ("Wilma") Diskin, Joan Sheingold Ditzion, Paula Brown Doress (later Paula Doress-Worters), Nancy Miriam Hawley (later Nancy Press Hawley), Elizabeth MacMahon-Herrera, Pamela Morgan, Judy Norsigian, Jane Pincus, Esther R. Rome, Wendy Coppedge Sanford, Norma Swenson and Sally Whelan. Most of this group remained together for more than twenty years, sharing their personal and professional lives, producing books, pamphlets, and articles; organizing conferences on women's health in the United States and abroad; lecturing in a variety of venues throughout the world; serving on advisory boards for a wide range of organizations, from local women's health centers to national advocacy groups to scientific/medical task forces; providing information on health issues to the general public, the media, and medical personnel; creating international networks to share information; and in numerous other ways shaping and expanding the women's health movement.

The success of the newsprint version of their course (more than 200,000 were sold through counter-culture channels, especially the Whole Earth Catalog) brought commercial publishers to their doorstep in the summer of 1971. Months of discussion ensued. After weighing all the pros and cons of using an established commercial publisher, and detailed examination of several possible publishing firms, the Collective chose Simon and Schuster. In order to sign the contract, they had to incorporate; their first meeting as the Boston Women's Health Book Collective took place January 11, 1972. According to their minutes, Wendy Sanford was designated President "because her address is used [as Boston Women's Health Book Collective address]," Esther Rome as Treasurer "because she will handle $ and sign checks," Nancy Hawley as Clerk "for no reason?" and Paula Doress as Trustee. Their contract with Simon and Schuster had several stipulations, among them that non-profit clinics and other organizations providing health counseling could purchase the books at a 70% discount to give away to low-income clients. Several hundred thousand copies of Our Bodies, Ourselves (1973) were distributed in this way.

The first book to provide information about women's health and medical issues in clear, direct language, with contributions from numerous readers about their personal experiences with health issues and the medical care system, Our Bodies, Ourselves (OBOS) was a commercial success, and has been revised and expanded numerous times (see below). Although it has been as important for raising the consciousness and level of knowledge among medical personnel as among the general public, it has not always been universally embraced. Beginning in the early 1980s, and continuing over the years, the Collective has had to fight back attempts by various conservative groups to ban the book from schools and libraries (see especially #18.20). These battles, in turn, generated further publicity. The Collective used their royalties to support other women's health projects, to eventually rent office space and open the Women's Health Information Center, and to do advocacy work. Included in the supported projects were Health Right, a women's health quarterly published between 1976 and 1981; "Taking Our Bodies Back," a film about the women's health movement; Porcupine Women's Health Collective in Wounded Knee, South Dakota, for women's health workshops and community education; Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vidas, the U.S. Spanish language edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves ; Women's Community Health Center, the only women-controlled health center in the Boston area (1974-1981), for operating support; the 1975 Conference on Women and Health, the first such national meeting; and the National Women's Health Network, towards printing expenses of a newsletter and production costs of nine Health Resource Guides published in 1979.

Members of the Collective have served on numerous boards, and cooperated with other organizations in a variety of outreach and advocacy efforts.

The following brief chronology for 1969-2001 is taken from several Boston Women's Health Book Collective timelines, and highlights some of their major events and accomplishments.

  • May 1969: Nancy Miriam Hawley leads workshop on "Women and Control of Their Bodies" at Female Liberation Conference organized by Bread and Roses, Emmanuel College, Boston.
  • Summer 1969: Workshop group continues to meet, doing research on selected topics.
  • November 1969: Group offers first informal course to Boston-area women on "Women and Their Bodies" at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
  • December 1970: New England Free Press prints the research papers in a newsprint book first called Women and Their Bodies: A Course, then Women and Our Bodies: A Course in a subsequent printing, and finally the title that stuck, Our Bodies, Ourselves: A Course by and for Women. The price dropped from 75 cents to 30 cents as sales increased. Over 200,000 copies sold through non-establishment channels such as women's centers and the Whole Earth Catalog.
  • Summer 1971: Group is approached by several commercial presses.
  • 1971 - 1973 : After many meetings and discussions, Simon and Schuster is chosen to publish first commercial version of Our Bodies, Ourselves, and the group works to revise all chapters.
  • January 1972: The group of eleven [or twelve?] women holds their first meeting January 11 as the newly incorporated Boston Women's Health Book Collective
  • March 1973: Simon and Schuster publishes a thoroughly revised edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves with photographs and personal anecdotes from readers around the country.
  • 1974 - 1981 : Provides operating support for the Women's Community Health Center, the only women-controlled health center in the Boston area.
  • 1975: Co-sponsors 1975 Conference on Women and Health in the Harvard medical area, the first such national meeting, with 2500 participants.
  • March 1976: A revised and expanded edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves is published by Simon and Schuster.
  • Fall 1976: Several members begin meeting to discuss their lives as parents; this eventually leads in 1978 to a book on parenting.
  • 1976 - 1981 : The Collective distributes "Women and Health Information Packets," containing copies of health-related articles, to over 600 women's groups and educators in the U.S. and abroad.
  • Summer 1977: Two members visit ten European countries to meet with women's health activists and women involved in various foreign translations of Our Bodies, Ourselves.
  • Fall 1977: The Boston Women's Health Book Collective self-publishes Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vidas (NCNV), the U.S. Spanish language edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves.
  • October 1978: The parenting project, joined earlier by four women from outside the group, completes their research and writing; Random House publishes Ourselves and Our Children. Parenting workshops begin.
  • April 1979: The Collective holds their first weekend retreat to celebrate 10 years together.
  • Summer 1979: Collective member visits India to help with plans for Indian adaptation of Our Bodies, Ourselves, and translation into several Indian languages.
  • Fall 1979: Factual updates of both Our Bodies, Ourselves and Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vidas are published.
  • 1980: Boston Women's Health Book Collective leases space in a Watertown, Massachusetts, church cultural center in order to open the Women's Health Information Center; co-publishes International Women and Health Resource Guide with ISIS (Women's International Information and Communication Service); helps to start a group that becomes Amigas Latinas en Accion Pro Salud (ALAS); and oversees publication of Changing Bodies, Changing Lives by Ruth Bell and others (Random House).
  • 1982: Publication of Talking with Your Teenager, by Ruth Bell and Lenny Wildflower (Random House).
  • 1983: Our Jobs, Our Health: A Woman's Guide to Occupational Health and Safety is co-published with the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health.
  • 1984: A thoroughly revised edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves is published as The New Our Bodies, Ourselves.
  • 1986: Boston Women's Health Book Collective moves several blocks to cultural center with handicap-accessibility and larger quarters.
  • 1987: Book on aging, Ourselves Growing Older: Women Aging with Knowledge and Power, by Paula Doress and Diana Siegal and the Midlife and Older Women's Book Project, is published by Simon and Schuster; a revised edition of Changing Bodies, Changing Lives is also published.
  • 1990: Boston Women's Health Book Collective moves to much larger space in Somerville, Massachusetts.
  • 1991: Collective joins other centers (SOS Corpo in Brazil, ISIS International in Chile, APDC in Malaysia, and Comunicación Intercambio y Desarrollo Humano en América Latina classification in Mexico) to form the Women and Health Documentation Center Network for computerization and information exchange.
  • 1992: The New Our Bodies, Ourselves is updated and expanded for the 1990s.
  • 1994: The New Ourselves Growing Older is updated and published.
  • 1996: Online edition of The New Our Bodies, Ourselves is launched by Health Gate Data Corporation.
  • 1998: Update of The New Our Bodies, Ourselves print edition is published; Our Bodies, Ourselves web site goes live.
  • 2001: The Collective moves to new space in the Boston University School of Public Health; its reference collection is transferred to the Countway Library of the Harvard Medical School.

From the guide to the Additional Records of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1966-2010, (Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Boston Women's Health Book Collective. Subject files, 1970-1998. Harvard University, Medical School, Countway Library
creatorOf Boston Women's Health Book Collective. Additional records of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1966-2010. Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Davis, Kathy, 1949-. Oral history interviews, 1998-1999 (inclusive). Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Hubbard, Ruth, 1924-. Papers of Ruth Hubbard, 1965-2007 (inclusive). Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Papers, 1935-2000 Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Records, 1905-2003 (inclusive), 1972-1997 (bulk) Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Boston Women's Health Book Collective. Audiotape collection of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1973-2000 [sound recording]. Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Boston Women's Health Book Collective printed collection, 1984-2000. Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Project on Women and Disability. Records of the Project on Women and Disability, 1983-1995. Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Brownmiller, Susan. Papers, 1935-2000 (inclusive). Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Additional Records of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1966-2010 Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Audiotape collection of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, 1973-2000 Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Boston Women's Health Book Collective. Records, 1905-2003 (inclusive), 1972-1997 (bulk). Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn Records, 1967-1990 Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
Role Title Holding Repository
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associatedWith Hawley, Nancy. person
correspondedWith Health Care for All corporateBody
correspondedWith HealthGate Data Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Health Planning Council for Greater Boston. corporateBody
associatedWith HealthRight corporateBody
associatedWith Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies corporateBody
associatedWith Heckscher, Rachel person
correspondedWith Henry Waxman person
associatedWith Hosken, Fran P., 1919-2006. person
associatedWith Hubbard, Ruth, 1924- person
associatedWith Hyman, Jane person
associatedWith Hyman, Jane. person
associatedWith Indo-American Fellowship Program corporateBody
associatedWith Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility corporateBody
correspondedWith International Women's Health Coalition corporateBody
associatedWith International Women's Tribune Center corporateBody
correspondedWith Irving Kenneth Zola's person
associatedWith ISIS International. corporateBody
associatedWith ISIS (Organization) corporateBody
associatedWith Isis-WICCE (Organization) corporateBody
correspondedWith Jamie Penney person
correspondedWith Jane Collective corporateBody
correspondedWith Jane Cottingham's person
associatedWith Jane Evans Latimer person
correspondedWith Jill Savage person
associatedWith Joe Pleck person
associatedWith John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. corporateBody
correspondedWith J. Robert Wagner person
associatedWith Judith A. Stein person
correspondedWith Judith Brillman person
associatedWith Judith Lennett person
associatedWith Katherine Meyer person
correspondedWith Kitty Dukakis person
correspondedWith Largely Positive, Inc. corporateBody
correspondedWith Laura Kaplan person
correspondedWith Laurie Crumpacker. person
associatedWith Lewis, Dustin person
associatedWith Linda Gordon. person
associatedWith MacMahon-Herrera, Elizabeth person
associatedWith MacMahon-Herrera, Elizabeth. person
associatedWith Magezi, Anna person
associatedWith Management Services for Health corporateBody
associatedWith Marian Sandmaier person
correspondedWith Mary Crowe person
associatedWith Mary Howell person
associatedWith Mary-Jo Good person
associatedWith Mary P. Rowe person
correspondedWith Massachusetts Breast Cancer Coalition corporateBody
associatedWith Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health corporateBody
associatedWith Massachusetts. Department of Public Health corporateBody
associatedWith Massachusetts. Dept. of Public Health. corporateBody
associatedWith Massachusetts Friends of Midwives. corporateBody
correspondedWith Massachusetts Public Health Association corporateBody
associatedWith Mayerson, Charlotte, 1927- person
associatedWith Melissa Gilbert person
correspondedWith Michael S. Dukakis person
correspondedWith Michael T. Resch person
associatedWith Middleton, Isabel person
correspondedWith Midwives Information and Resource Service corporateBody
associatedWith Morgan, Pamela. person
correspondedWith Morgan, Susanne. person
correspondedWith Nancy Hawley person
associatedWith National Association of Parents and Professionals for Safe Alternatives in Childbirth corporateBody
correspondedWith National Consumers League corporateBody
correspondedWith National Science Foundation corporateBody
associatedWith National Women's Health Network (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith National Women's Mailing List corporateBody
associatedWith National Women's Studies Association corporateBody
correspondedWith New Hampshire Feminist Health Center corporateBody
correspondedWith Nissim, Rina person
associatedWith Norsigian, Judy. person
associatedWith North Shore Birth Center corporateBody
correspondedWith Oliver Cope person
associatedWith Oram, Charlotte person
correspondedWith Pamela Berger person
associatedWith Pan American Health Organization corporateBody
associatedWith Patel, Raju person
associatedWith Pathfinder Fund corporateBody
associatedWith Patricia McCormack person
correspondedWith Paula Doress Worters person
associatedWith Pauline Bart. person
correspondedWith Peggy Henderson person
associatedWith Peggy Wegman person
associatedWith People's Health Legislation Action Group corporateBody
associatedWith Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association corporateBody
associatedWith Phyllis Chesler person
associatedWith Pincus, Jane person
associatedWith Pincus, Jane. person
correspondedWith Polly Brown person
associatedWith Project on Women and Disability. corporateBody
associatedWith Public Citizen corporateBody
correspondedWith Public Citizen Health Research Group corporateBody
correspondedWith Puerto Rico Congress on Women and Health corporateBody
correspondedWith Putney, Pam person
associatedWith Quass, Susan person
associatedWith Random House (Firm) corporateBody
correspondedWith Random House, Inc. corporateBody
correspondedWith Rasna Warah person
associatedWith Reproductive Health Matters. corporateBody
associatedWith Reproductive Rights National Network. corporateBody
correspondedWith Rhode Island Women's Health Collective corporateBody
associatedWith Rifas, Leonard person
associatedWith Rising Sun Feminist Health Alliance. corporateBody
associatedWith Robbins, Trina person
associatedWith Rome, Esther R. person
correspondedWith Rowe, Mary person
associatedWith Ruth Davidson Bell person
associatedWith Ruth L. Fischbach person
correspondedWith Sally Tom person
associatedWith Sanford, Wendy Coppedge, 1944- person
correspondedWith Santa Cruz Women's Health Collective corporateBody
associatedWith Sara Rimer's person
associatedWith Seaman, Barbara. person
correspondedWith Seda Khachatrian. person
associatedWith Sen Gupta, Nandini person
correspondedWith Sheila Kitzinger. person
correspondedWith Shere Hite. person
associatedWith Simon and Schuster, inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Social Justice for Women. corporateBody
correspondedWith Society for Menstrual Cycle Research corporateBody
associatedWith SOS Corpo--Instituto Feminista para a Democracia. corporateBody
associatedWith Steinem, Gloria. person
associatedWith Steven John Fellman person
correspondedWith SUNY Downstate Medical Center corporateBody
associatedWith Susan Brownmiller person
associatedWith Swenson, Norma. person
associatedWith Tejada, Gloria person
correspondedWith Theater Grenade corporateBody
correspondedWith The Mothers' Center corporateBody
associatedWith Tristan, Flora person
associatedWith Trude Bennett. person
correspondedWith Unitarian Universalist Service Committee corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Food and Drug Administration. corporateBody
associatedWith University of Illinois at Chicago Health Strategy Collaborative corporateBody
correspondedWith Upjohn Company corporateBody
correspondedWith Vermont Women's Health Center corporateBody
associatedWith Virginia Rankin MacLean person
correspondedWith Walker, Rosanna person
associatedWith Wandschneider, Margarita person
correspondedWith Weaver, Amy person
correspondedWith Weiss, Cora person
associatedWith Whelan, Sally person
associatedWith Whelan, Sally. person
associatedWith Wolhandler, Jill person
associatedWith Wolhandler, Jill. person
associatedWith Woman Health International corporateBody
correspondedWith Women and International Development Joint Harvard/MIT Group corporateBody
correspondedWith Women Make Movies corporateBody
correspondedWith Women's Action Group corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Campaign for Social Justice corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Community Health Center (Cambridge, Mass.) corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Community Health Center (Cambridge, Mass.) corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Educational Center. corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Health and Learning Center corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Health Clinic corporateBody
correspondedWith Women's Health Coalition corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Health Concerns Committee corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Health Information Center (Watertown, Mass.) corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Health Network of Massachusetts corporateBody
correspondedWith Women's Health Research Institute corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Health Services, Inc. corporateBody
correspondedWith Women's Institute for Childbearing Policy corporateBody
correspondedWith Women's International Public Health Network corporateBody
correspondedWith Women's News Service corporateBody
associatedWith Women's State-wide Legislative Network of Massachusetts corporateBody
associatedWith Women's State-wide Legislative Network of Massachusetts. corporateBody
associatedWith World Health Organization corporateBody
associatedWith Yanco, Jennifer person
associatedWith Yanco, Jennifer J. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
North America
United States
Great Britain
North America
Massachusetts--Boston
Great Britain
Africa
Latin America
Latin America
United States
United States
Asia
Africa
Massachusetts--Boston
Asia
North America
Europe
Massachusetts--Boston
Latin America
Europe
Subject
Meeting
Reproductive health
Menstruation
Organizational change
Feminists
The New Our Bodies, Ourselves--Translations into Armenian
Women--Social networks
Patient education
Breast implants
Health education--Europe
Menopause
The New Our Bodies, Ourselves
Contraception
Abortion
Equal rights amendments
Pro-choice movement
Health education--Latin America
Libraries and women
Tampons--Complications
Medroxyprogesterone
Health education--Great Britain
Feminism--International cooperation
Patient advocacy
Premenstrual syndrome
Pharmaceutical industry--Health aspects
Health education--Africa
Women's health services
Collection development (Libraries)
Overweight women--Social conditions
Feminists--Massachusetts--Boston
Health education--North America
AIDS (Disease)--Prevention
Breast implants--Complications
Group decision making
Hispanic Americans
Women with disabilities
Surrogate motherhood
Our Bodies, Ourselves--Translations
Medical laws and legislation
Cervical caps
Eating disorders
Family violence
Toxic shock syndrome
Birthing centers
The New Our Bodies, Ourselves--Translations
Patient advocacy--United States
Discrimination in medical care
Our Bodies, Ourselves
Health education--Asia
Older women--Health and hygiene
Nuestros Cuerpos, Nuestras Vida
Infant formulas
Women--Congresses
Women--Health and hygiene
Women health reformers
Midwives
Body image
Lesbians
Medical laws and legislation--United States
Pro-choice movement--United States
Health education
Parenting
Health education--United States
Communication in organizations
Ourselves and Our Children
Networking and libraries
Women's health
Nutrition
Childbirth
Occupation
Function

Corporate Body

Active 1973

Active 2000

English,

Spanish; Castilian,

French

Information

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