Sears, Paul B. (Paul Bigelow), 1891-1990

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Paul Bigelow Sears, educator and ecologist, was born on December 17, 1891 in Bucyrus, Ohio. He received his B.S. degree in 1913 from Ohio Wesleyan University. He earned a M.A. from the University of Nebraska in 1915 and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1922. He began his teaching career as an instructor in botany at Ohio State University and subsequently taught at the University of Nebraska (1919-1927), the University of Oklahoma (1927-1938), and Oberlin College (1938-1950). In 1950 Sears became chairman of the Yale University Conservation Program, in which capacity he served until he was named professor emeritus in 1960. Sears pursued research in paleobotany, specifically fossil pollens, while also publishing many works on conservation and ecology directed to a more general audience. He was a member of numerous professional scientific organizations and civic groups interested in conservation. Sears served as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), president of the Ecological Society of America (1948), and chairman of the board of the National Audubon Society (1956-1959). Paul Sears died on April 30, 1990.

From the description of Paul Bigelow Sears papers, 1910-1969 (inclusive). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702165808

Paul Bigelow Sears, educator, botanist, ecologist and conservationist was born on December 17, 1891, in Bucyrus, Ohio, to Rufus Victor and Sallie Harris Sears. He attended Ohio Wesleyan University, receiving a B.S. degree in 1913 and a B.A. in 1914. From there he went to the University of Nebraska and received an M.A. in 1915, after which he studied at the University of Chicago, earning his Ph.D. in botany in 1922. Sears married Marjorie Lea McCutcheon on June 22, 1917, and served in the United States Army from 1917-1918. The Sears' had three children, Paul McCutcheon, Catherine Louise (Mrs. Arthur Frazer), and Sallie Harris Sears.

Sears began his teaching career as an instructor in botany at Ohio State University (1915-1919). He then served as assistant and associate professor of botany at the University of Nebraska (1919-1927). From 1928 to 1938 Sears taught at the University of Oklahoma and was head of the Botany Department. He also served as a botanist for the State Biological Survey of Oklahoma. His books from these years presented issues in the study of ecology to the public. These included Deserts On The March (1935), for which Sears received a Book of the Month award, This Is Our World (1937), and Who Are These Americans (1939). Sears also produced ecology study guides and textbooks for science teachers and their students.

From 1938 until 1950, Sears served as professor of botany at Oberlin College. In Ohio, Sears was active in local conservation groups and was instrumental in the founding of Friends of the Land in Ohio. In 1946 he was named to the Ohio Conservation Commission and worked to create an Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Sears was also active in the Ecological Society of America and was elected president of the society in 1948.

In 1950 Sears was named professor of conservation and chairman of the Conservation Program at Yale University. The Conservation Program at Yale was the country's first graduate program in the conservation of natural resources. From 1953 - 1955 Sears also served as chairman of the Plant Science Department at Yale. In 1952 Sears received the Conservation medal from the Garden Club of America and in 1956 he was named Eminent Botanist by the Botanical Society of America. Sears served as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), Sigma Xi national lecturer (1956), chairman of the board the National Audubon Society (1956-1959), and president of the American Society of Naturalists (1959). From 1958 - 1964, Sears was a member of the National Science Board and from 1959 - 1972 he served on the Plowshare Advisory Committee of the Atomic Energy Commission.

In 1960 Sears retired from Yale and was named professor emeritus. Subsequently he served as visiting professor in the Tom Wallace Chair of Conservation at the University of Louisville and was a visiting faculty member at the University of Hawaii, Carleton College, Wake Forest College, and the University of Southern Illinois. From 1963 - 1965 Sears chaired the commission on science education of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1965 Sears was named Eminent Ecologist by the Ecological Society of America. During the decade of the 1960s Sears published Where There Is Life (1962), The Living Landscape (1966), and Lands Beyond the Forest (1969), as well as writing articles of technical and general interest on applied ecology.

Paul B. Sears, perhaps more than any other person, epitomized American plant ecology. In a professional career spanning almost 7 decades, he made major contributions to vegetation mapping, paleoecology and Pleistocene history, vegetation studies, conservation, human ecology and our use of land; and particularly, the varied roles of scientists in modern society. He was one of the most respected and honored ecologists in North America. He died in the medical center at Plaza de Retiro on April 30, 1990.

From the description of Paul Bigelow Sears Collection, 1832-1969, (bulk 1930-1966). (University of Arizona). WorldCat record id: 708260596

Paul Bigelow Sears, educator, botanist, ecologist and conservationist was born on December 17, 1891, in Bucyrus, Ohio, to Rufus Victor and Sallie Harris Sears. He attended Ohio Wesleyan University, receiving a B.S. degree in 1913 and a B.A. in 1914. From there he went to the University of Nebraska and received an M.A. in 1915, after which he studied at the University of Chicago, earning his Ph.D. in botany in 1922. Sears married Marjorie Lea McCutcheon on June 22, 1917, and served in the United States Army from 1917-1918. The Sears’ had three children, Paul McCutcheon, Catherine Louise (Mrs. Arthur Frazer), and Sallie Harris Sears.

Sears began his teaching career as an instructor in botany at Ohio State University (1915-1919). He then served as assistant and associate professor of botany at the University of Nebraska (1919-1927). From 1928 to 1938 Sears taught at the University of Oklahoma and was head of the Botany Department. He also served as a botanist for the State Biological Survey of Oklahoma. His books from these years presented issues in the study of ecology to the public. These included Deserts On The March (1935), for which Sears received a Book of the Month award, This Is Our World (1937), and Who Are These Americans (1939). Sears also produced ecology study guides and textbooks for science teachers and their students.

From 1938 until 1950, Sears served as professor of botany at Oberlin College. In Ohio, Sears was active in local conservation groups and was instrumental in the founding of Friends of the Land in Ohio. In 1946 he was named to the Ohio Conservation Commission and worked to create an Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Sears was also active in the Ecological Society of America and was elected president of the society in 1948.

In 1950 Sears was named professor of conservation and chairman of the Conservation Program at Yale University. The Conservation Program at Yale was the country's first graduate program in the conservation of natural resources. From 1953 - 1955 Sears also served as chairman of the Plant Science Department at Yale. In 1952 Sears received the Conservation medal from the Garden Club of America and in 1956 he was named Eminent Botanist by the Botanical Society of America. Sears served as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), Sigma Xi national lecturer (1956), chairman of the board the National Audubon Society (1956-1959), and president of the American Society of Naturalists (1959). From 1958 - 1964, Sears was a member of the National Science Board and from 1959 - 1972 he served on the Plowshare Advisory Committee of the Atomic Energy Commission.

In 1960 Sears retired from Yale and was named professor emeritus. Subsequently he served as visiting professor in the Tom Wallace Chair of Conservation at the University of Louisville and was a visiting faculty member at the University of Hawaii, Carleton College, Wake Forest College, and the University of Southern Illinois. From 1963 - 1965 Sears chaired the commission on science education of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1965 Sears was named Eminent Ecologist by the Ecological Society of America. During the decade of the 1960s Sears published Where There Is Life (1962), The Living Landscape (1966), and Lands Beyond the Forest (1969), as well as writing articles of technical and general interest on applied ecology.

Paul B. Sears, perhaps more than any other person, epitomized American plant ecology. In a professional career spanning almost 7 decades, he made major contributions to vegetation mapping, paleoecology and Pleistocene history, vegetation studies, conservation, human ecology and our use of land; and particularly, the varied roles of scientists in modern society. He was one of the most respected and honored ecologists in North America. He died in the medical center at Plaza de Retiro in Taos, New Mexico on April 30, 1990.

From the guide to the Paul Bigelow Sears Collection, 1832-1969, 1930-1966 (bulk), (Special Collections, University Libraries)

Paul Bigelow Sears, educator and ecologist, was born on December 17, 1891 in Bucyrus, Ohio. He received his B.S. degree in 1913 from Ohio Wesleyan University. He earned a M.A. from the University of Nebraska in 1915 and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1922. He began his teaching career as an instructor in botany at Ohio State University and subsequently taught at the University of Nebraska (1919-1927), the University of Oklahoma (1927-1938), and Oberlin College (1938-1950). In 1950 Sears became chairman of the Yale University Conservation Program, in which capacity he served until he was named professor emeritus in 1960. Sears pursued research in paleobotany, specifically fossil pollens, while also publishing many works on conservation and ecology directed to a more general audience. He was a member of numerous professional scientific organizations and civic groups interested in conservation. Sears served as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), president of the Ecological Society of America (1948), and chairman of the board of the National Audubon Society (1956-1959). Paul Sears died on April 30, 1990.

Paul Bigelow Sears, educator and ecologist, was born on December 17, 1891, in Bucyrus, Ohio, to Rufus Victor and Sallie Harris Sears. He attended Ohio Wesleyan University, receiving a B.S. degree in 1913 and a B.A. in 1914. From there he went to the University of Nebraska and received an M.A. in 1915, after which he studied at the University of Chicago, earning his Ph.D. in botany in 1922. Sears married Marjorie Lea McCutcheon on June 22, 1917, and served in the United States Army from 1917-1918. The Searses had three children, Paul McCutcheon, Catherine Louise (Mrs. Arthur Frazer), and Sallie Harris Sears.

Sears began his teaching career as an instructor in botany at Ohio State University (1915-1919). He then served as assistant and associate professor of botany at the University of Nebraska (1919-1927). From 1928 to 1938 Sears taught at the University of Oklahoma and was head of the Botany Department. He also served as a botanist for the State Biological Survey of Oklahoma. His books from these years presented issues in the study of ecology to the public. These included Deserts On The March (1935), for which Sears received a Book of the Month award, This Is Our World (1937), and Who Are These Americans (1939). Sears also produced ecology study guides and textbooks for science teachers and their students.

From 1938 until 1950, Sears served as professor of botany at Oberlin College. In Ohio, Sears was active in local conservation groups and was instrumental in the founding of Friends of the Land in Ohio. In 1946 he was named to the Ohio Conservation Commission and worked to create an Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Sears was also active in the Ecological Society of America and was elected president of the society in 1948.

In 1950 Sears was named professor of conservation and chairman of the Conservation Program at Yale University. The Conservation Program at Yale was the country's first graduate program in the conservation of natural resources. From 1953 - 1955 Sears also served as chairman of the Plant Science Department at Yale. In 1952 Sears received the Conservation medal from the Garden Club of America and in 1956 he was named Eminent Botanist by the Botanical Society of America. Sears served as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), Sigma Xi national lecturer (1956), chairman of the board the National Audubon Society (1956-1959), and president of the American Society of Naturalists (1959). From 1958 - 1964, Sears was a member of the National Science Board and from 1959 - 1972 he served on the Plowshare Advisory Committee of the Atomic Energy Commission.

In 1960 Sears retired from Yale and was named professor emeritus. Subsequently he served as visiting professor in the Tom Wallace Chair of Conservation at the University of Louisville and was a visiting faculty member at the University of Hawaii, Carleton College, Wake Forest College, and the University of Southern Illinois. From 1963 - 1965 Sears chaired the commission on science education of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1965 Sears was named Eminent Ecologist by the Ecological Society of America. During the decade of the 1960s Sears published Where There Is Life (1962), The Living Landscape (1966), and Lands Beyond the Forest (1969), as well as writing articles of technical and general interest on applied ecology.

From the guide to the Paul Bigelow Sears papers, 1910-1969, (Manuscripts and Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Records. : Series II., Alfred A. Knopf Personal, 1874-1984 (bulk 1953-1984). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Sears, Paul B. (Paul Bigelow), 1891-1990. Notes on original forest cover of Ohio, 1924. Ohio State University Libraries
creatorOf Sears, Paul B. (Paul Bigelow), 1891-1990. Paul Bigelow Sears Collection, 1832-1969, (bulk 1930-1966). University of Arizona Libraries
creatorOf Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Records. Series VII., Other Department Files, 1916-1996 (bulk 1943-1969). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn The Nation, records, 1879-1974 (inclusive), 1920-1955 (bulk). Houghton Library
creatorOf McHarg, Ian L. Ian L. McHarg papers, 1942-2001. University of Pennsylvania, Architectural Archives
referencedIn American Scholar, Records, 1926-2006, (bulk 1944-2005) Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
referencedIn Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society Virginia Chapter. General records of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, Virginia Chapter [manuscript], 1924-1960 [1985]. University of Virginia. Library
creatorOf Paul Bigelow Sears papers, 1910-1969 Yale University. Department of Manuscripts and Archives
referencedIn Rombauer family. Papers of the Rombauer-Becker family, 1795-1992 (inclusive). Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
referencedIn American Scholar records, 1926-2006 (bulk 1944-2005). Library of Congress
creatorOf Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Records. : Series I., General Correspondence, 1922-1977 (bulk 1946-1966). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Paul Bigelow Sears Collection, 1832-1969, 1930-1966 (bulk) Special Collections, University Libraries
creatorOf Sears, Paul B. (Paul Bigelow), 1891-1990. Letters, 1938-1954, to Lewis Mumford. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
creatorOf Sears, Paul B. (Paul Bigelow), 1891-1990. Paul Bigelow Sears papers, 1910-1969 (inclusive). Yale University Library
creatorOf Waller, Adolph Edward, 1892-1975. Papers, 1916-1971. Ohio State University Libraries
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Adams, Charles C. (Charles Christopher), 1873-1955. person
associatedWith Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith American Association for the Advancement of Science. corporateBody
associatedWith American Council on Education. corporateBody
associatedWith American Institute of Biological Sciences. corporateBody
correspondedWith American Scholar corporateBody
associatedWith American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. corporateBody
associatedWith Bennett, Hugh Hammond, 1881- person
associatedWith Botanical Society of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Boyko, Hugo. person
associatedWith Brandt, Joseph August, 1899- person
associatedWith Bromfield, Louis, 1896-1956. person
associatedWith Browning, Bryce Cogsil, 1894- person
associatedWith Cain, Stanley Adair, 1902- person
associatedWith Clepper, Henry Edward, 1901- person
associatedWith Columbia University. Teacher's College. Bureau of Education Research in Science. corporateBody
associatedWith Commission on Resources and Education. corporateBody
associatedWith Connecticut River Watershed Council. corporateBody
associatedWith Conservation Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Dambach, Charles Arthur. person
associatedWith Darling, Jay Norwood, 1876- person
associatedWith Diller, Oliver D. person
associatedWith Ecological Society of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Fink, Ollie E. person
associatedWith Forman, Jonathan, 1887- person
associatedWith Friends of the Land (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Garden Club of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Goodwin, Richard H. (Richard Hale) person
associatedWith Hanna, Paul Robert, 1902- person
associatedWith Happ, George B. person
associatedWith Happ, George B. person
associatedWith Hayden, Hiram. person
associatedWith Hayden, Hiram. person
associatedWith International Commission for Applied Ecology. corporateBody
associatedWith Ivey, John Eli, 1919- person
associatedWith Izaak Walton League of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Lord, Russell, 1895- person
associatedWith Lord, Russell, 1895-1964. person
associatedWith Lottinville, Savoie, 1906- person
associatedWith Malabar Farm Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith McHarg, Ian L. person
associatedWith Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District. corporateBody
associatedWith National Audubon Society. corporateBody
associatedWith National Research Council (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith National Science Board (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith National Science Foundation (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith National Wildlife Foundation. corporateBody
correspondedWith Nation (New York, N.Y. : 1865). corporateBody
associatedWith Natural Resources Council of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Nature Conservancy (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Oberlin College. corporateBody
associatedWith Ohio. Dept. of Natural Resources. corporateBody
associatedWith Ohio. Dept. of Natural Resources. corporateBody
associatedWith Ohio Forestry Association. corporateBody
associatedWith Osborn, Fairfield, 1887- person
associatedWith Osborn, Fairfield, 1887- person
associatedWith Pough, Richard Hooper, 1904- person
associatedWith Powers, Samuel Ralph, 1887- person
associatedWith Resources for the Future. corporateBody
associatedWith Rombauer family. family
associatedWith Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society Virginia Chapter. corporateBody
associatedWith Soil Conservation Society of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Thone, Frank Ernest Aloysius, 1891- person
associatedWith Thornthwaite, Charles Warren, 1899- person
associatedWith Thornthwaite, Charles Warren, 1899- person
associatedWith United States. President's Science Advisory Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. President's Task Force on the Preservation of Natural Beauty. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Soil Conservation Service. corporateBody
associatedWith University of Louisville. corporateBody
associatedWith University of Oklahoma. corporateBody
associatedWith University of Oklahoma Press. corporateBody
associatedWith U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. corporateBody
associatedWith Van Loon, Henry B. person
associatedWith Van Loon, Henry B. person
associatedWith Waller, Adolph Edward, 1892-1975. person
associatedWith Weaver, Warren, 1894-1978. person
associatedWith Wilderness Society. corporateBody
associatedWith Yale University corporateBody
associatedWith Yale University. Faculty. corporateBody
associatedWith Yale University. Graduate School. Dept. of Conservation. corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
Connecticut
Ohio
Mexico
Canada
United States
United States
Ohio
Subject
Science and state
Science teachers--Societies, etc
Endowment of research--United States
Pollen--Research
Environmental protection--Citizen participation
Environmental protection
Gardening--Societies, etc
Ecology--Research
Ecology--Study and teaching
Arid regions
Pollen, Fossil
Endowment of research
Forests and forestry
Science and state--United States
Science teachers--United States--Societies, etc
Paleobotany
Environmental protection--Connecticut
Environmental protection--Ohio
Desert ecology
Soil conservation
Soil conservation--United States
Conservation of natural resources--Study and teaching
Environmental policy
Botany--Research
Science--Study and teaching
Occupation
Botanists
Educators
Conservationists
Ecologists
Activity

Person

Birth 1891-12-17

Death 1990-04-30

Information

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