Newsom, Carroll Vincent, 1904-....

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A graduate of the College of Emporia, Kansas in 1924 with a A.B. degree in mathematics, Carroll Newsom earned his M.A. (1927) and Ph.D. (1931) from the University of Michigan, where he became an instructor in 1927. His other academic positions included Chairman of the Math Department at Oberlin College (1944-1948), Assistant Commissioner (1948), and Associate Commissioner for Higher Education, in the state of New York (1950-55), and Executive Vice President (1956), and President of New York University (1956-1962). Newsom was responsible for increasing NYU's financial resources and building expansion. He served as president and director of Prentice-Hall, Inc., from 1964-1965, moving on to the post of vice-president for education at RCA, a position which permitted further work in one of Newsom's special fields of interest, that of educational television. Other interests of Newsom included religious history, third-world dilemmas, and mathematics.

From the description of Papers, 1924-1986. (New York University, Group Batchload). WorldCat record id: 477059542

Carroll Newsom 's illustrious career, amply showcased in a resume which lists 52 major positions, 37 "minor positions," 9 published books and 24 honorary degrees (in addition to three earned degrees), is only partially illuminated by the materials contained in this collection. Nonetheless, the Newsom papers offer a glimpse of his career beyond his position as President of New York University, and are of particular value in contributing to a knowledge of the ideas, philosophy, and achievements of this hybrid businessman-scholar.

Carroll Newsom graduated from the College of Emporia, Kansas in 1924, receiving his A.B. degree in mathematics. A prodigy in mathematics, Newsom became an instructor of mathematics at the University of Michigan in 1927, the institution from which he received his M.A. in 1927 and PhD. in 1931 . His achievements at this university anticipate his later career. Reworking the traditional mathematics curriculum of the university, which Newsom characterized simply as being "bad," Newsom had become a full professor and department chairman in the astonishingly short space of five years.

During the Second World War, and the consequent increased demand for mathematicians and scientists, Newsom took a position as Chairman of the Science Division at Oberlin College . Newsom had already written about both the positive and negative potential of atomic energy(in An American Philosophy of Education). During one meeting with a nervous President Truman, Newsom advised the new President to continue with the Manhattan Project, after Truman had asked him, "Do you think this is something I should pursue?"

At the war's end, Newsom and two other American doctors helped to reorganize medical education in France, for which Newsom was later awarded the French Legion of Honor. Taking leave of Oberlin in 1948, Newsom moved on to New York, where he took the post of Assistant Commissioner of Higher Education in 1948 . As Associate Commissioner from 1950 to 1955, Newsom was instrumental in developing the state university system.

Newsom's last stop on the educational trail was at New York University, first as Executive Vice President from 1955 to 1956, then as President from 1956 to 1962 (his resignation took effect on January 1, 1962 ). His tenure as NYU President was considered by the university trustees to be "the most fruitful in the university's history, in the increase of financial resources and in building expansion." During his presidency, NYU's assets increased from $111 million to $178 million, a total of $70 million in gifts having been received during his tenure as President.

Newsom moved on to the Senior Vice President slot at Prentice-Hall, becoming president and director of the publishing firm in 1964 . Yet once again, Newsom's brief tenure at Prentice-Hall resembled that of a corporate raider, as he left the presidency of the firm in 1965, only one year after having taken the position. Actually, he resignation was partially prompted by the failure of RCA (of which Newsom was a Director) in its attempt to merge with Prentice-Hall . For the next three years( 1966 to 1969 ), Newsom held the post of vice-president for education at RCA, a position which permitted further work in one of Newsom's special fields of interest, that of educational television.

The brevity of Newsom's tenure at various corporate institutions can be attributed in part to the multiplicity of his interests. As already mentioned, one of his foremost concerns was the educational potential of television, which Newsom glimpsed at the very germination of the new medium in the early 1950's . His ideas were set forth in a landmark text on the subject, A Television Policy for Education ( 1952 ), which held its own for at least two decades as a authoritative source of information on education television policy . Newsom's other interests include religious history (one of his later books, The Roots of Christianity, was deemed "a truly great book" by Normal Vincent Peale), third-world dilemmas (he served as President of American Friends of Ethiopia ), and, of course, his starting point, mathematics.

From the guide to the Carroll Newsom Papers, 1924-1986, (New York University Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn Records of the Office of the Chancellor and Executive Vice President (David D. Henry and Carroll V. Newsom, John E. Ivey, Jr., George D. Stoddard, and Russell D. Niles), Bulk, 1952-1956, 1942-1966, (Bulk 1952-1956) New York University. Archives.
creatorOf Newsom, Carroll Vincent, 1904-. Papers, 1924-1986. New-York Historical Society
referencedIn Records of the Office of the University Architect/Joseph J. Roberto Collection, 1928-1987 New York University. Archives.
creatorOf New York University. Office of the President. Office of the President administrative records, 1951-1965. Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Records of the Office of the President/Chancellor, 1951-1965 New York University. Archives.
referencedIn John Mason Brown papers, 1922-1967. Houghton Library.
creatorOf New York University. Correspondence with Marian Anderson, 1946-1971. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
referencedIn New York University. Office of the Chancellor and Executive Vice President. Records, 1952-1966. Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Records of Educational Television at New York University, 1952-1956 New York University. Archives.
creatorOf Newsom, Carroll Vincent, 1904-. Correspondence with Marian Anderson, 1969. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
referencedIn Mathematical Association of America. Mathematical Association of America records, 1916- University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn George Sarton additional papers, 1901-1956. Houghton Library.
creatorOf Ithaca College. Correspondence with Marian Anderson, 1968-1970. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
referencedIn Records of the Office of the Assistant to the Chancellor/President (James W. Armsey), 1952-1956 New York University. Archives.
referencedIn Records of the Interfaith Council of Washington Square College, 1948-1970 New York University. Archives.
referencedIn New York University. Office of the Executive Vice-Chancellor. Records of the Office of the Executive Vice-Chancellor, administrations of David D. Henry and Carroll Newsom, 1952-1956. Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Richard Courant Papers, 1902-1972 New York University. Archives.
referencedIn New York University. Office of the University Architect. Joseph J. Roberto administrative records, 1928-1987 (bulk 1960-1987). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Wilder, Raymond Louis, 1896-1982. Wilder, Raymond Louis, papers, 1914-1982. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
creatorOf Carroll Newsom Papers, 1924-1986 New York University. Archives.
referencedIn Records of the Bureau of Public Occasions, Bulk, 1950-1976, 1935-1976 New York University. Archives.
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Armsey, James person
correspondedWith Brown, John Mason, 1900-1969 person
associatedWith Ithaca College. corporateBody
associatedWith Mathematical Association of America. corporateBody
associatedWith New York University corporateBody
associatedWith New York University. Bureau of Public Occasions. corporateBody
associatedWith New York University. Office of the Chancellor and Executive Vice President. corporateBody
associatedWith New York University. Office of the Executive Vice-Chancellor. corporateBody
associatedWith New York University. Office of the President. corporateBody
associatedWith New York University. Office of the President. corporateBody
associatedWith NYU corporateBody
associatedWith Oberlin College. Faculty. corporateBody
associatedWith Office of the Chancellor and Executive Vice President person
associatedWith Prentice-Hall, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith RCA Corporation. corporateBody
associatedWith Roberto, Joseph J. person
correspondedWith Sarton, George, 1884-1956 person
associatedWith School of Social Work. corporateBody
associatedWith State University of New York. corporateBody
associatedWith Wilder, Raymond Louis, 1896-1982. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
New York (State)
Subject
College presidents--New York University
Oberlin College--faculty
Television in education
New York University--presidents
Occupation
Function

Person

Birth 1904

Death 1990

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