Hayes, Helen, 1900-1993

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American actress.

From the description of Helen Hayes papers, 1952-1980. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 218473254

From the description of An oral history interview with Helen Hayes / conducted by Peggy Meyer Sherry for the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Weill-Lenya Research Center, Nyack, New York, 1991 July 25 : recording and transcript. (Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison). WorldCat record id: 122579830

Helen Hayes (1900-1993), leading American actress, known as the "First Lady of American Theater," made her stage debut in 1905 and by the 1920s was a fixture on the Broadway stage, appearing over the years in such classics as SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, MARY OF SCOTLAND, THE FRONT PAGE, and THE GLASS MENAGERIE, and as Queen Victoria in VICTORIA REGINA, perhaps her best-known role.

Anita Loos, American author and screenwriter, wrote over 150 screenplays beginning in the silent era, but is perhaps best known for her 1925 novel, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES, which she adapted for both the stage and screen.

Her witty touch helped propel the careers of Douglas Fairbanks, Mae West, Carol Channing and Marilyn Monroe. In the 1940s, Loos was asked by her friend, actress Helen Hayes, to write a script that would help Hayes break out of a string of overly serious roles. Loos wrote HAPPY BIRTHDAY, starring a librarian in a bar. The play premiered on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theater on Halloween 1946 and ran for 564 performances. Later, Loos collaborated with Hayes on a book about New York City, TWICE OVER LIGHTLY: NEW YORK THEN AND NOW (1972).

From the description of Helen Hayes correspondence with Anita Loos. 1946-1993 and n.d. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 79427302

Helen Hayes Brown was born in Washington, D.C. on October 10, 1900.

Her parents were Frank and Catherine Essie Brown. With her mother's encouragement, Hayes made her stage debut at the age of five and began performing both in amateur productions as well as the stock company, The Columbia Players. While performing in a recital for Miss Minnie Hawke's School of Dance, Hayes was spotted by Lew Fields. Fields, half of the Weber and Fields comedy team, as well as a producer, recognized Hayes's talent and cast her in the New York production of Old Dutch in 1908. Deeming Helen Hayes Brown too long to fit on a theater marquee, Fields shortened her name to Helen Hayes. In over twenty-five productions, from 1908 until 1917, Hayes appeared on Broadway, in summer stock, and with numerous touring companies. The 1918 production of Dear Brutus garnered her positive notices, began her lifelong association with James M. Barrie plays, and introduced her to William Gillette. Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, became an important mentor and acting coach throughout Hayes's life. In the 1920s, Hayes made the transition from young adult to ingénue roles. By 1926, she appeared in another James M. Barrie play, the revival of What Every Woman Knows, achieving her first true critical and commercial success; the character, Maggie, remained her favorite role throughout her lifetime. Hayes married Charles MacArthur, playwright, in 1928. They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930, and in 1937 adopted a son, James. Mary, an aspiring actress, died of polio in 1949, at the age of nineteen. James became an actor and had a successful career in film and television. Charles MacArthur died in 1956; Hayes never remarried. During the early years of her marriage to MacArthur, the couple relocated to Hollywood in order for Helen to try her hand at movies and MacArthur at screenwriting. Hayes won the Academy Award for her first film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet. In general, Hayes was dissatisfied with her Hollywood experience, as she did not feel her acting style suited film and was disappointed in the quality of scripts. In 1934, after the negative experience of filming What Every Woman Knows, Hayes declared she had given up film for good. Hayes and MacArthur decided to re-settle their family in Nyack, NY. Hayes did not have a significant role in film for another 13 years. With the success of Mary of Scotland in 1933, followed by her triumph in Victoria Regina in 1938, Hayes's reputation as one of the great actresses of the theater was established. Although she worked steadily in radio, film, and television, Hayes's first love was theater, and the majority of her career was focused in that direction. She appeared in plays by Shakespeare, O'Neill, Thorton Wilder, and Tennessee Williams. Her last major appearance was in 1971 as Mary in Long Day's Journey Into Night; after which she was forced to retire due to asthma and allergic reactions to stage dust. In addition to her artistic career, Hayes was a dedicated activist for various political, charitable, and social causes. She campaigned vigorously for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, and at the request of Franklin Roosevelt, gave speeches and organized programs to rally support for American intervention during World War II. She was a tireless fundraiser and spokesperson for the March of Dimes; in particular, during the first vaccination trials in 1953. Other organizations with which she was involved include the American National Red Cross, Stage Door Canteen, Girl Scouts of the USA, Actor's Equity, and ANTA. Throughout her life, she advocated the importance of theater to American culture. In 1961, at President Kennedy's behest, she led the Theatre Guild's American Repertory Company on a worldwide tour featuring productions of The Glass Menagerie and The Skin of Our Teeth. Hayes is one of only nine people to win an Emmy, a Tony, a Grammy and an Oscar. In addition to acting awards, Hayes received numerous appointments, honors, and honorary degrees. Helen Hayes' impressive career spanned eight decades during which she saw major success, both artistic and commercial, in the media of stage, screen, television, and radio. Because of her dedication to theater, she earned the title of "First Lady of the American Theater." Helen Hayes died in 1993 at her home in Nyack, NY.

From the description of Helen Hayes papers, 1817-1963 (1905-1963, bulk dates) (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 243664652

Actress.

Born Washington D.C., (Helen Hayes Brown), debut at age 5 as Prince Charles in The Royal Family; to NYC 1909, Broadway debut. Graduated Sacred Heart Convent 1917, long career on stage; Married Charles MacArthur; National Arts Council 1966- ; Academy Award, 1970, Airport; Autobiography, A Gift of Joy, 1965.

From the description of Papers, 1897-1967. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 51616710

Helen Hayes was born 10 October 1900 in Washington, D.C.

Her long and distinguished career has earned her the title "First Lady of the American Theatre."

From the description of Papers, 1941-1980. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122576043

Helen Hayes (1900-1993), leading American actress, known as the "First Lady of American Theater," made her stage debut in 1905 and by the 1920s was a fixture on the Broadway stage, appearing over the years in such classics as SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, MARY OF SCOTLAND, THE FRONT PAGE, and THE GLASS MENAGERIE, and as Queen Victoria in VICTORIA REGINA, perhaps her best-known role.

Anita Loos, American author and screenwriter, wrote over 150 screenplays beginning in the silent era, but is perhaps best known for her 1925 novel, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES, which she adapted for both the stage and screen. Her witty touch helped propel the careers of Douglas Fairbanks, Mae West, Carol Channing and Marilyn Monroe. In the 1940s, Loos was asked by her friend, actress Helen Hayes, to write a script that would help Hayes break out of a string of overly serious roles. Loos wrote HAPPY BIRTHDAY, starring a librarian in a bar. The play premiered on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theater on Halloween 1946 and ran for 564 performances. Later, Loos collaborated with Hayes on a book about New York City, TWICE OVER LIGHTLY: NEW YORK THEN AND NOW (1972).

From the guide to the Helen Hayes correspondence with Anita Loos, 1946-1993 and undated, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Helen Hayes Brown was born in Washington, D.C. on October 10, 1900. Her parents were Frank and Catherine “Essie” Brown. With her mother’s encouragement, Hayes made her stage debut at the age of five and began performing both in amateur productions as well as the stock company, The Columbia Players. While performing in a recital for Miss Minnie Hawke’s School of Dance, Hayes was spotted by Lew Fields. Fields, half of the Weber and Fields comedy team, as well as a producer, recognized Hayes’s talent and cast her in the New York production of Old Dutch in 1908. Deeming Helen Hayes Brown too long to fit on a theater marquee, Fields shortened her name to Helen Hayes.

In over twenty-five productions, from 1908 until 1917, Hayes appeared on Broadway, in summer stock, and with numerous touring companies. The 1918 production of Dear Brutus garnered her positive notices, began her lifelong association with James M. Barrie plays, and introduced her to William Gillette. Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, became an important mentor and acting coach throughout Hayes’s life. In the 1920s, Hayes made the transition from young adult to ingénue roles. By 1926, she appeared in another James M. Barrie play, the revival of What Every Woman Knows, achieving her first true critical and commercial success; the character, Maggie, remained her favorite role throughout her lifetime.

Hayes married Charles MacArthur, playwright, in 1928. They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930, and in 1937 adopted a son, James. Mary, an aspiring actress, died of polio in 1949, at the age of nineteen. James became an actor and had a successful career in film and television. Charles MacArthur died in 1956; Hayes never remarried.

During the early years of her marriage to MacArthur, the couple relocated to Hollywood in order for Helen to try her hand at movies and MacArthur at screenwriting. Hayes won the Academy Award for her first film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet . In general, Hayes was dissatisfied with her Hollywood experience, as she did not feel her acting style suited film and was disappointed in the quality of scripts. In 1934, after the negative experience of filming What Every Woman Knows, Hayes declared she had given up film for good. Hayes and MacArthur decided to re-settle their family in Nyack, NY. Hayes did not have a significant role in film for another 13 years.

With the success of Mary of Scotland in 1933, followed by her triumph in Victoria Regina in 1938, Hayes’s reputation as one of the great actresses of the theater was established. Although she worked steadily in radio, film, and television, Hayes’s first love was theater, and the majority of her career was focused in that direction. She appeared in plays by Shakespeare, O’Neill, Thorton Wilder, and Tennessee Williams. Her last major appearance was in 1971 as Mary in Long Day’s Journey Into Night ; after which she was forced to retire due to asthma and allergic reactions to stage dust.

In addition to her artistic career, Hayes was a dedicated activist for various political, charitable, and social causes. She campaigned vigorously for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, and at the request of Franklin Roosevelt, gave speeches and organized programs to rally support for American intervention during World War II. She was a tireless fundraiser and spokesperson for the March of Dimes; in particular, during the first vaccination trials in 1953. Other organizations with which she was involved include the American National Red Cross, Stage Door Canteen, Girl Scouts of the USA, Actor’s Equity, and ANTA. Throughout her life, she advocated the importance of theater to American culture. In 1961, at President Kennedy’s behest, she led the Theatre Guild’s American Repertory Company on a worldwide tour featuring productions of The Glass Menagerie and The Skin of Our Teeth .

Hayes is one of only nine people to win an Emmy, a Tony, a Grammy and an Oscar. In addition to acting awards, Hayes received numerous appointments, honors, and honorary degrees. Helen Hayes’ impressive career spanned eight decades during which she saw major success, both artistic and commercial, in the media of stage, screen, television, and radio. Because of her dedication to theater, she earned the title of “First Lady of the American Theater”. Helen Hayes died in 1993 at her home in Nyack, NY.

From the guide to the Helen Hayes papers, 1817-1963, 1905-1963, dates, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Helen Hayes Brown was born in Washington, D.C. on October 10, 1900. Her parents were Frank and Catherine “Essie” Brown. With her mother’s encouragement, Hayes made her stage debut at the age of five and began performing both in amateur productions as well as the stock company, The Columbia Players. While performing in a recital for Miss Minnie Hawke’s School of Dance, Hayes was spotted by Lew Fields. Fields, half of the Weber and Fields comedy team, as well as a producer, recognized Hayes’s talent and cast her in the New York production of Old Dutch in 1908. Deeming Helen Hayes Brown too long to fit on a theater marquee, Fields shortened her name to Helen Hayes.

In over twenty-five productions, from 1908 until 1917, Hayes appeared on Broadway, in summer stock, and with numerous touring companies. The 1918 production of Dear Brutus garnered her positive notices, began her lifelong association with James M. Barrie plays, and introduced her to William Gillette. Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, became an important mentor and acting coach throughout Hayes’s life. In the 1920s, Hayes made the transition from young adult to ingénue roles. By 1926, she appeared in another James M. Barrie play, the revival of What Every Woman Knows, achieving her first true critical and commercial success; the character, Maggie, remained her favorite role throughout her lifetime.

Hayes married Charles MacArthur, playwright, in 1928. They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930, and in 1937 adopted a son, James. Mary, an aspiring actress, died of polio in 1949, at the age of nineteen. James became an actor and had a successful career in film and television. Charles MacArthur died in 1956; Hayes never remarried.

During the early years of her marriage to MacArthur, the couple relocated to Hollywood in order for Helen to try her hand at movies and MacArthur at screenwriting. Hayes won the Academy Award for her first film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet . In general, Hayes was dissatisfied with her Hollywood experience, as she did not feel her acting style suited film and was disappointed in the quality of scripts. In 1934, after the negative experience of filming What Every Woman Knows, Hayes declared she had given up film for good. Hayes and MacArthur decided to re-settle their family in Nyack, NY. Hayes did not have a significant role in film for another 13 years.

With the success of Mary of Scotland in 1933, followed by her triumph in Victoria Regina in 1938, Hayes’s reputation as one of the great actresses of the theater was established. Although she worked steadily in radio, film, and television, Hayes’s first love was theater, and the majority of her career was focused in that direction. She appeared in plays by Shakespeare, O’Neill, Thorton Wilder, and Tennessee Williams. Her last major appearance was in 1971 as Mary in Long Day’s Journey Into Night ; after which she was forced to retire due to asthma and allergic reactions to stage dust.

In addition to her artistic career, Hayes was a dedicated activist for various political, charitable, and social causes. She campaigned vigorously for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, and at the request of Franklin Roosevelt, gave speeches and organized programs to rally support for American intervention during World War II. She was a tireless fundraiser and spokesperson for the March of Dimes; in particular, during the first vaccination trials in 1953. Other organizations with which she was involved include the American National Red Cross, Stage Door Canteen, Girl Scouts of the USA, Actor’s Equity, and ANTA. Throughout her life, she advocated the importance of theater to American culture. In 1961, at President Kennedy’s behest, she led the Theatre Guild’s American Repertory Company on a worldwide tour featuring productions of The Glass Menagerie and The Skin of Our Teeth .

Hayes is one of only nine people to win an Emmy, a Tony, a Grammy and an Oscar. In addition to acting awards, Hayes received numerous appointments, honors, and honorary degrees. Helen Hayes’ impressive career spanned eight decades during which she saw major success, both artistic and commercial, in the media of stage, screen, television, and radio. Because of her dedication to theater, she earned the title of “First Lady of the American Theater”. Helen Hayes died in 1993 at her home in Nyack, NY.

From the guide to the Helen Hayes papers, 1952-1980, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Architect, artist and author, Alfred Bendiner lived all his life in Pennsylvania, but travelled extensively gathering material for his widely published drawings. He was born in 1899 in Pittsburgh to a Hungarian family that soon moved to Philadelphia. After service in World War I, he earned a bachelors degree in 1922 and a masters of architecture in 1927 from the University of Pennsylvania while working as a draftsman for the architect, Paul P. Cret. He then joined the architectural firm of Habeson, Hough, Livingston, and Larsen in Philadelphia, and, in 1929, opened his own office. In the 1930s he began contributing gently satirical caricatures and scenes to many periodicals including The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, The Philadelphia Record, and The Washington Times-Herald . He also wrote articles for The Atlantic Monthly, the University of Pennsylvania Gazette, and other periodicals and authored a slightly irreverent column for The Journal of the American Institute of Architects entitled "Life in a Martini Glass." He was also a staff artist on two University of Pennsylvania archaeological expeditions: Iraq in 1936 and Guatemala in 1960.

Alfred Bendiner drew constantly and always had his miniature paint box, brush and tiny bottle of water tucked in his vest pocket. At times he painted on menus and napkins, and if he ran out of water, it is said, he used wine, coffee, or even his own saliva.

Bendiner was a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and president of the Philadelphia chapter in 1952. He died in 1964 and was posthumously elected an associate member of the National Academy of Design. His work has been exhibited in many one-man and group shows and is in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Library of Congress, the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. Some of his caricatures of concerts and the theater for The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin were published, along with his comments, in his book, Music to My Eyes .

From the guide to the Alfred Bendiner caricatures and related papers, 1929-1992, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Archival Resources
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referencedIn Rogers, Fred. [Letter, 1977 Mar. 30 : to Senator John O. Pastore]. Saint Vincent College, Saint Vincent Library
creatorOf Gish, Lillian, 1893-1993. Lillian Gish papers, 1909-1992. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Records of the Office of Civilian Defense. 1939 - 1945. Motion Picture Films. 1941 - 1943. CARE FOR CHILDREN 2 TO 5 OF WORKING MOTHERS
referencedIn Florence Ryerson papers, 1924-1948 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
referencedIn Boorstin, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph), 1914-2004. Daniel J. Boorstin papers, 1882-1995 (bulk 1944-1994). Library of Congress
referencedIn Selinsky, Wladimir, 1910-1984. Wladimir Selinsky papers 1941-1981. New York Public Library System, NYPL
creatorOf Digges, Dudley, 1879-1947. Dudley Digges papers, 1908-1947. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Rodgers, Dorothy F., 1909-. Papers, 1922-1987 (inclusive). Harvard University, Schlesinger Library
referencedIn Meade, Marion, 1934-. Marion Meade papers, 1859-1993. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Cornell, Katharine. Katharine Cornell Papers 1801-1983 (Bulk dates 1921-1974). New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Robert C. Schnitzer and Marcella Cisney papers, ca.1890-1989 The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.
referencedIn Crowther, Frank, 1932-1976. Frank Crowther papers, 1955-1976 [manuscript]. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
creatorOf Helen Hayes papers, 1952-1980 The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.
creatorOf Swanson, Gloria. Papers. Series II. Career, ca. 1914-1983. Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Ohio State University. Libraries. Friends of the Libraries. Actors, singers, playwrights, politicians, etc. scrapbook. 1900-1940. Ohio State University Libraries
referencedIn General Records of the Department of the Treasury. 1775 - 2005. General Records Relating to Bond Sales Promotion
creatorOf Hayes, Helen, 1900-1993. [Letter, 1978 May 14 : to Fred Rogers]. Saint Vincent College, Saint Vincent Library
referencedIn Malvern, Gladys. Gladys Malvern papers, 1944-1957. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Wladimir Selinsky papers, 1941-1981 The New York Public Library. Music Division.
referencedIn Woodstock Library (Woodstock, N.Y.). Photograph collection, [ca. 1895-1980] Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Rogers, Fred. [Letter, 1977 Oct. 4 : to Dear Ones]. Saint Vincent College, Saint Vincent Library
referencedIn Rogers, Fred. [Letter, 1977 Mar. 30 : to Mr. and Mrs. S.P. Mellon]. Saint Vincent College, Saint Vincent Library
referencedIn Rogers, Fred. [Letter, 1978 Mar. 9 : to Rev. John McCall]. Saint Vincent College, Saint Vincent Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Actors' Fund of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Adams, Reily Gibson, 1911- person
associatedWith American Theatre Wing. corporateBody
associatedWith Anderson, Maxwell, 1888-1959. person
associatedWith Armstrong, Charl person
associatedWith Back, Gunnar, 1907-1983. person
associatedWith Ballard, Lucinda. person
associatedWith Barrymore, Ethel, 1879-1959 person
associatedWith Barry, Philip, 1896-1949 person
associatedWith Bendiner, Alfred. person
associatedWith Bohnen, Carl, 1872-1951. person
correspondedWith Boorstin, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph), 1914-2004. person
associatedWith Brent, Romney, 1902-1975 person
associatedWith Brown, Joe E. (Joe Evan), 1892- person
correspondedWith Bruccoli, Matthew Joseph, 1931- person
associatedWith Bryson, Bernarda. person
associatedWith Bryson, Bernarda Shahn person
associatedWith Buchwald, Art. person
associatedWith Buka, Donald person
associatedWith Cantor, Eddie, 1892-1964 person
associatedWith Carey, Harry, 1878-1947 person
associatedWith Cavillo, Leo person
associatedWith Columbia University. Brander Matthews Dramatic Museum. corporateBody
associatedWith Cooper, Betty Miller, person
correspondedWith Cornell, Katharine. person
associatedWith Cornell, Katharine, 1893-1974. person
associatedWith Crawford, Jack Randall, b. 1878. person
associatedWith Cronyn, Hume person
associatedWith Crowther, Frank, 1932-1976. person
associatedWith Dean, Marguerite, 1891-1978. person
associatedWith Digges, Dudley, 1879-1947. person
associatedWith Dolbin, Benedikt F. person
associatedWith Downer, Alan Seymour, 1912- person
associatedWith Eisenhower, Mamie Doud, 1896-1979. person
associatedWith Erskine, Marilyn, 1924- person
associatedWith Ferrer, Melchor person
associatedWith Finkelstein Memorial Library (Spring Valley, N.Y.) corporateBody
associatedWith Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Francis Scott), 1896-1940. person
associatedWith Gillette, William, 1853-1937. person
associatedWith Gish, Lillian, 1893-1993. person
associatedWith Gomez, S. Thomas person
associatedWith Gordon, Ruth, 1896- person
associatedWith Hanes, R. Philip, 1926-2011. person
correspondedWith Harriman, Florence Jaffray, 1870-1967. person
associatedWith Hecht, Ben, 1894-1964. person
associatedWith Hellman, Florence Marx. person
associatedWith Hewitt, Alan. person
associatedWith Housman, Laurence, 1865-1959. person
associatedWith Huston, Philip, 1908- person
associatedWith Johnson, Nunnally. person
associatedWith Kaufman, Enit, 1908?-1961. person
associatedWith Kaufman, George S. (George Simon), 1889-1961 person
associatedWith Kerr, Walter F., 1913-1966. person
associatedWith Kitchelt, Florence Ledyard Cross, 1874-1961. person
associatedWith Kroll, Lucy. person
associatedWith Lenya, Lotte, 1898-1981. person
associatedWith Lindsay, Howard, 1889-1968. person
associatedWith Loeb, Philip, 1894-1955 person
associatedWith Loos, Anita, 1893-1981. person
associatedWith Lucy Kroll Agency. corporateBody
associatedWith Lunt, Alfred. person
associatedWith MacArthur, Charles, 1895-1956. person
associatedWith MacArthur, James, 1937- person
associatedWith MacLeish, Archibald, 1892-1982. person
associatedWith Malvern, Gladys. person
associatedWith Marx, Harpo, 1888-1964 person
associatedWith Matthew J. and Arlyn Bruccoli Collection of F. Scott Fitzgerald. corporateBody
associatedWith Meade, Marion, 1934- person
associatedWith Mendelsohn, Felix, Jr person
associatedWith Mendelsohn, Felix, Jr. person
associatedWith Merrill, Phyllis, 1908- person
associatedWith Mexico. corporateBody
associatedWith Miller, Gilbert. person
associatedWith Moorehead, Agnes, 1906-1974. person
associatedWith Morehouse, Ward, 1898-1966. person
associatedWith Mothers' Association (University of Illinois) corporateBody
associatedWith Muni, Paul, 1895-1967 person
associatedWith Museum of the City of New York. corporateBody
associatedWith North Carolina School of the Arts. corporateBody
associatedWith O'Brien-Moore, Erin, 1902-1979 person
associatedWith Odets, Clifford, 1906-1963 person
associatedWith O'Malley, J. Pat (James Pat) person
associatedWith Our Little Brothers (Organization) corporateBody
associatedWith Paxinou, Katina person
associatedWith Porter, Cole, 1891-1964. person
associatedWith Powell, Lewis F., 1907-1998. person
associatedWith Price, Vincent, 1911-1993. person
associatedWith Raphaelson, Samson, 1896-1983. person
associatedWith Reis, Claire R. (Claire Raphael) person
associatedWith Rice, Elmer, 1892-1967, person
associatedWith Rodgers, Dorothy F., 1909- person
associatedWith Rogers, Fred. person
associatedWith Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962. person
associatedWith Ross, George person
associatedWith Ryerson, Florence. person
associatedWith Salk, Jonas, 1914-1995. person
correspondedWith Schain, Josephine, 1886-1972. person
associatedWith Schnitzer, Robert C. person
associatedWith Scott, Raymond, 1910- person
associatedWith Selby, Rosemary person
associatedWith Selby, Rosemary. person
associatedWith Selinsky, Wladimir, 1910- person
associatedWith Selinsky, Wladimir, 1910-1984. person
associatedWith Shepherd, Ann person
associatedWith Sherry, Peggy Meyer, person
associatedWith Slesin, Aviva. person
associatedWith Smith, Lillian person
associatedWith Spewack, Samuel, 1899-1971 person
associatedWith Spewack, Samuel and Bella. person
associatedWith Stein and Day Publishers. corporateBody
associatedWith Stoddard, Haila, 1913- person
associatedWith Sundberg, Clinton person
associatedWith Swanson, Gloria. person
correspondedWith Teichmann, Howard. person
associatedWith Thayer, John Eldon, 1899-1980 person
associatedWith Unger, Arthur person
associatedWith Weill, Kurt, 1900-1950. person
associatedWith White, Jane person
associatedWith Wilder, Thornton, 1897-1975. person
associatedWith Wood, Audrey, 1905- person
associatedWith Woodstock Library (Woodstock, N.Y.). corporateBody
associatedWith Woollcott, Alexander, 1887-1943. person
associatedWith Wynn, Ed, 1886-1966 person
associatedWith Young Audiences inc. corporateBody
correspondedWith Zorina, Vera. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
Subject
Theater--United States
Theater
Theater--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--Drawings
Actors
Actors--Caricatures and cartoons
Actresses--History--Sources
Motion picture actors and actresses
Theater--History
Television interviews
Occupation
Actors
Actresses
Function

Person

Birth 1900-10-10

Death 1993-03-17

Americans

English

Information

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Ark ID: w6f191g9

SNAC ID: 45601465