Hayes, Helen, 1900-1993

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1900-10-10
Death 1993-03-17
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

American actress.

From the description of Helen Hayes papers, 1952-1980. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 218473254

From the description of An oral history interview with Helen Hayes / conducted by Peggy Meyer Sherry for the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Weill-Lenya Research Center, Nyack, New York, 1991 July 25 : recording and transcript. (Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison). WorldCat record id: 122579830

Helen Hayes (1900-1993), leading American actress, known as the "First Lady of American Theater," made her stage debut in 1905 and by the 1920s was a fixture on the Broadway stage, appearing over the years in such classics as SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, MARY OF SCOTLAND, THE FRONT PAGE, and THE GLASS MENAGERIE, and as Queen Victoria in VICTORIA REGINA, perhaps her best-known role.

Anita Loos, American author and screenwriter, wrote over 150 screenplays beginning in the silent era, but is perhaps best known for her 1925 novel, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES, which she adapted for both the stage and screen.

Her witty touch helped propel the careers of Douglas Fairbanks, Mae West, Carol Channing and Marilyn Monroe. In the 1940s, Loos was asked by her friend, actress Helen Hayes, to write a script that would help Hayes break out of a string of overly serious roles. Loos wrote HAPPY BIRTHDAY, starring a librarian in a bar. The play premiered on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theater on Halloween 1946 and ran for 564 performances. Later, Loos collaborated with Hayes on a book about New York City, TWICE OVER LIGHTLY: NEW YORK THEN AND NOW (1972).

From the description of Helen Hayes correspondence with Anita Loos. 1946-1993 and n.d. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 79427302

Helen Hayes Brown was born in Washington, D.C. on October 10, 1900.

Her parents were Frank and Catherine Essie Brown. With her mother's encouragement, Hayes made her stage debut at the age of five and began performing both in amateur productions as well as the stock company, The Columbia Players. While performing in a recital for Miss Minnie Hawke's School of Dance, Hayes was spotted by Lew Fields. Fields, half of the Weber and Fields comedy team, as well as a producer, recognized Hayes's talent and cast her in the New York production of Old Dutch in 1908. Deeming Helen Hayes Brown too long to fit on a theater marquee, Fields shortened her name to Helen Hayes. In over twenty-five productions, from 1908 until 1917, Hayes appeared on Broadway, in summer stock, and with numerous touring companies. The 1918 production of Dear Brutus garnered her positive notices, began her lifelong association with James M. Barrie plays, and introduced her to William Gillette. Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, became an important mentor and acting coach throughout Hayes's life. In the 1920s, Hayes made the transition from young adult to ingénue roles. By 1926, she appeared in another James M. Barrie play, the revival of What Every Woman Knows, achieving her first true critical and commercial success; the character, Maggie, remained her favorite role throughout her lifetime. Hayes married Charles MacArthur, playwright, in 1928. They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930, and in 1937 adopted a son, James. Mary, an aspiring actress, died of polio in 1949, at the age of nineteen. James became an actor and had a successful career in film and television. Charles MacArthur died in 1956; Hayes never remarried. During the early years of her marriage to MacArthur, the couple relocated to Hollywood in order for Helen to try her hand at movies and MacArthur at screenwriting. Hayes won the Academy Award for her first film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet. In general, Hayes was dissatisfied with her Hollywood experience, as she did not feel her acting style suited film and was disappointed in the quality of scripts. In 1934, after the negative experience of filming What Every Woman Knows, Hayes declared she had given up film for good. Hayes and MacArthur decided to re-settle their family in Nyack, NY. Hayes did not have a significant role in film for another 13 years. With the success of Mary of Scotland in 1933, followed by her triumph in Victoria Regina in 1938, Hayes's reputation as one of the great actresses of the theater was established. Although she worked steadily in radio, film, and television, Hayes's first love was theater, and the majority of her career was focused in that direction. She appeared in plays by Shakespeare, O'Neill, Thorton Wilder, and Tennessee Williams. Her last major appearance was in 1971 as Mary in Long Day's Journey Into Night; after which she was forced to retire due to asthma and allergic reactions to stage dust. In addition to her artistic career, Hayes was a dedicated activist for various political, charitable, and social causes. She campaigned vigorously for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, and at the request of Franklin Roosevelt, gave speeches and organized programs to rally support for American intervention during World War II. She was a tireless fundraiser and spokesperson for the March of Dimes; in particular, during the first vaccination trials in 1953. Other organizations with which she was involved include the American National Red Cross, Stage Door Canteen, Girl Scouts of the USA, Actor's Equity, and ANTA. Throughout her life, she advocated the importance of theater to American culture. In 1961, at President Kennedy's behest, she led the Theatre Guild's American Repertory Company on a worldwide tour featuring productions of The Glass Menagerie and The Skin of Our Teeth. Hayes is one of only nine people to win an Emmy, a Tony, a Grammy and an Oscar. In addition to acting awards, Hayes received numerous appointments, honors, and honorary degrees. Helen Hayes' impressive career spanned eight decades during which she saw major success, both artistic and commercial, in the media of stage, screen, television, and radio. Because of her dedication to theater, she earned the title of "First Lady of the American Theater." Helen Hayes died in 1993 at her home in Nyack, NY.

From the description of Helen Hayes papers, 1817-1963 (1905-1963, bulk dates) (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 243664652

Actress.

Born Washington D.C., (Helen Hayes Brown), debut at age 5 as Prince Charles in The Royal Family; to NYC 1909, Broadway debut. Graduated Sacred Heart Convent 1917, long career on stage; Married Charles MacArthur; National Arts Council 1966- ; Academy Award, 1970, Airport; Autobiography, A Gift of Joy, 1965.

From the description of Papers, 1897-1967. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 51616710

Helen Hayes was born 10 October 1900 in Washington, D.C.

Her long and distinguished career has earned her the title "First Lady of the American Theatre."

From the description of Papers, 1941-1980. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122576043

Helen Hayes (1900-1993), leading American actress, known as the "First Lady of American Theater," made her stage debut in 1905 and by the 1920s was a fixture on the Broadway stage, appearing over the years in such classics as SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, MARY OF SCOTLAND, THE FRONT PAGE, and THE GLASS MENAGERIE, and as Queen Victoria in VICTORIA REGINA, perhaps her best-known role.

Anita Loos, American author and screenwriter, wrote over 150 screenplays beginning in the silent era, but is perhaps best known for her 1925 novel, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES, which she adapted for both the stage and screen. Her witty touch helped propel the careers of Douglas Fairbanks, Mae West, Carol Channing and Marilyn Monroe. In the 1940s, Loos was asked by her friend, actress Helen Hayes, to write a script that would help Hayes break out of a string of overly serious roles. Loos wrote HAPPY BIRTHDAY, starring a librarian in a bar. The play premiered on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theater on Halloween 1946 and ran for 564 performances. Later, Loos collaborated with Hayes on a book about New York City, TWICE OVER LIGHTLY: NEW YORK THEN AND NOW (1972).

From the guide to the Helen Hayes correspondence with Anita Loos, 1946-1993 and undated, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Helen Hayes Brown was born in Washington, D.C. on October 10, 1900. Her parents were Frank and Catherine “Essie” Brown. With her mother’s encouragement, Hayes made her stage debut at the age of five and began performing both in amateur productions as well as the stock company, The Columbia Players. While performing in a recital for Miss Minnie Hawke’s School of Dance, Hayes was spotted by Lew Fields. Fields, half of the Weber and Fields comedy team, as well as a producer, recognized Hayes’s talent and cast her in the New York production of Old Dutch in 1908. Deeming Helen Hayes Brown too long to fit on a theater marquee, Fields shortened her name to Helen Hayes.

In over twenty-five productions, from 1908 until 1917, Hayes appeared on Broadway, in summer stock, and with numerous touring companies. The 1918 production of Dear Brutus garnered her positive notices, began her lifelong association with James M. Barrie plays, and introduced her to William Gillette. Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, became an important mentor and acting coach throughout Hayes’s life. In the 1920s, Hayes made the transition from young adult to ingénue roles. By 1926, she appeared in another James M. Barrie play, the revival of What Every Woman Knows, achieving her first true critical and commercial success; the character, Maggie, remained her favorite role throughout her lifetime.

Hayes married Charles MacArthur, playwright, in 1928. They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930, and in 1937 adopted a son, James. Mary, an aspiring actress, died of polio in 1949, at the age of nineteen. James became an actor and had a successful career in film and television. Charles MacArthur died in 1956; Hayes never remarried.

During the early years of her marriage to MacArthur, the couple relocated to Hollywood in order for Helen to try her hand at movies and MacArthur at screenwriting. Hayes won the Academy Award for her first film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet . In general, Hayes was dissatisfied with her Hollywood experience, as she did not feel her acting style suited film and was disappointed in the quality of scripts. In 1934, after the negative experience of filming What Every Woman Knows, Hayes declared she had given up film for good. Hayes and MacArthur decided to re-settle their family in Nyack, NY. Hayes did not have a significant role in film for another 13 years.

With the success of Mary of Scotland in 1933, followed by her triumph in Victoria Regina in 1938, Hayes’s reputation as one of the great actresses of the theater was established. Although she worked steadily in radio, film, and television, Hayes’s first love was theater, and the majority of her career was focused in that direction. She appeared in plays by Shakespeare, O’Neill, Thorton Wilder, and Tennessee Williams. Her last major appearance was in 1971 as Mary in Long Day’s Journey Into Night ; after which she was forced to retire due to asthma and allergic reactions to stage dust.

In addition to her artistic career, Hayes was a dedicated activist for various political, charitable, and social causes. She campaigned vigorously for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, and at the request of Franklin Roosevelt, gave speeches and organized programs to rally support for American intervention during World War II. She was a tireless fundraiser and spokesperson for the March of Dimes; in particular, during the first vaccination trials in 1953. Other organizations with which she was involved include the American National Red Cross, Stage Door Canteen, Girl Scouts of the USA, Actor’s Equity, and ANTA. Throughout her life, she advocated the importance of theater to American culture. In 1961, at President Kennedy’s behest, she led the Theatre Guild’s American Repertory Company on a worldwide tour featuring productions of The Glass Menagerie and The Skin of Our Teeth .

Hayes is one of only nine people to win an Emmy, a Tony, a Grammy and an Oscar. In addition to acting awards, Hayes received numerous appointments, honors, and honorary degrees. Helen Hayes’ impressive career spanned eight decades during which she saw major success, both artistic and commercial, in the media of stage, screen, television, and radio. Because of her dedication to theater, she earned the title of “First Lady of the American Theater”. Helen Hayes died in 1993 at her home in Nyack, NY.

From the guide to the Helen Hayes papers, 1817-1963, 1905-1963, dates, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Helen Hayes Brown was born in Washington, D.C. on October 10, 1900. Her parents were Frank and Catherine “Essie” Brown. With her mother’s encouragement, Hayes made her stage debut at the age of five and began performing both in amateur productions as well as the stock company, The Columbia Players. While performing in a recital for Miss Minnie Hawke’s School of Dance, Hayes was spotted by Lew Fields. Fields, half of the Weber and Fields comedy team, as well as a producer, recognized Hayes’s talent and cast her in the New York production of Old Dutch in 1908. Deeming Helen Hayes Brown too long to fit on a theater marquee, Fields shortened her name to Helen Hayes.

In over twenty-five productions, from 1908 until 1917, Hayes appeared on Broadway, in summer stock, and with numerous touring companies. The 1918 production of Dear Brutus garnered her positive notices, began her lifelong association with James M. Barrie plays, and introduced her to William Gillette. Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, became an important mentor and acting coach throughout Hayes’s life. In the 1920s, Hayes made the transition from young adult to ingénue roles. By 1926, she appeared in another James M. Barrie play, the revival of What Every Woman Knows, achieving her first true critical and commercial success; the character, Maggie, remained her favorite role throughout her lifetime.

Hayes married Charles MacArthur, playwright, in 1928. They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930, and in 1937 adopted a son, James. Mary, an aspiring actress, died of polio in 1949, at the age of nineteen. James became an actor and had a successful career in film and television. Charles MacArthur died in 1956; Hayes never remarried.

During the early years of her marriage to MacArthur, the couple relocated to Hollywood in order for Helen to try her hand at movies and MacArthur at screenwriting. Hayes won the Academy Award for her first film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet . In general, Hayes was dissatisfied with her Hollywood experience, as she did not feel her acting style suited film and was disappointed in the quality of scripts. In 1934, after the negative experience of filming What Every Woman Knows, Hayes declared she had given up film for good. Hayes and MacArthur decided to re-settle their family in Nyack, NY. Hayes did not have a significant role in film for another 13 years.

With the success of Mary of Scotland in 1933, followed by her triumph in Victoria Regina in 1938, Hayes’s reputation as one of the great actresses of the theater was established. Although she worked steadily in radio, film, and television, Hayes’s first love was theater, and the majority of her career was focused in that direction. She appeared in plays by Shakespeare, O’Neill, Thorton Wilder, and Tennessee Williams. Her last major appearance was in 1971 as Mary in Long Day’s Journey Into Night ; after which she was forced to retire due to asthma and allergic reactions to stage dust.

In addition to her artistic career, Hayes was a dedicated activist for various political, charitable, and social causes. She campaigned vigorously for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, and at the request of Franklin Roosevelt, gave speeches and organized programs to rally support for American intervention during World War II. She was a tireless fundraiser and spokesperson for the March of Dimes; in particular, during the first vaccination trials in 1953. Other organizations with which she was involved include the American National Red Cross, Stage Door Canteen, Girl Scouts of the USA, Actor’s Equity, and ANTA. Throughout her life, she advocated the importance of theater to American culture. In 1961, at President Kennedy’s behest, she led the Theatre Guild’s American Repertory Company on a worldwide tour featuring productions of The Glass Menagerie and The Skin of Our Teeth .

Hayes is one of only nine people to win an Emmy, a Tony, a Grammy and an Oscar. In addition to acting awards, Hayes received numerous appointments, honors, and honorary degrees. Helen Hayes’ impressive career spanned eight decades during which she saw major success, both artistic and commercial, in the media of stage, screen, television, and radio. Because of her dedication to theater, she earned the title of “First Lady of the American Theater”. Helen Hayes died in 1993 at her home in Nyack, NY.

From the guide to the Helen Hayes papers, 1952-1980, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Architect, artist and author, Alfred Bendiner lived all his life in Pennsylvania, but travelled extensively gathering material for his widely published drawings. He was born in 1899 in Pittsburgh to a Hungarian family that soon moved to Philadelphia. After service in World War I, he earned a bachelors degree in 1922 and a masters of architecture in 1927 from the University of Pennsylvania while working as a draftsman for the architect, Paul P. Cret. He then joined the architectural firm of Habeson, Hough, Livingston, and Larsen in Philadelphia, and, in 1929, opened his own office. In the 1930s he began contributing gently satirical caricatures and scenes to many periodicals including The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, The Philadelphia Record, and The Washington Times-Herald . He also wrote articles for The Atlantic Monthly, the University of Pennsylvania Gazette, and other periodicals and authored a slightly irreverent column for The Journal of the American Institute of Architects entitled "Life in a Martini Glass." He was also a staff artist on two University of Pennsylvania archaeological expeditions: Iraq in 1936 and Guatemala in 1960.

Alfred Bendiner drew constantly and always had his miniature paint box, brush and tiny bottle of water tucked in his vest pocket. At times he painted on menus and napkins, and if he ran out of water, it is said, he used wine, coffee, or even his own saliva.

Bendiner was a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and president of the Philadelphia chapter in 1952. He died in 1964 and was posthumously elected an associate member of the National Academy of Design. His work has been exhibited in many one-man and group shows and is in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Library of Congress, the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. Some of his caricatures of concerts and the theater for The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin were published, along with his comments, in his book, Music to My Eyes .

From the guide to the Alfred Bendiner caricatures and related papers, 1929-1992, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

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Subjects:

  • Theater--United States
  • Theater
  • Theater--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia--Drawings
  • Actors
  • Actors--Caricatures and cartoons
  • Actresses--History--Sources
  • Motion picture actors and actresses
  • Theater--History
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  • Actresses

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  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)