William Smith Mason autograph collection, 1800-1929 (inclusive).

ArchivalResource

Mason, William Smith, b. 1866,. William Smith Mason autograph collection, 1800-1929 (inclusive).

William Smith Mason autograph collection, 1800-1929 (inclusive).

The collection consists of autograph manuscripts, documents and correspondence of people in public life. The collection contains correspondence of Theodore Roosevelt with Francis J. Heney and others and copies of letters of the Jonathan Knight family.

.25 linear ft. (1 box)

Related Entities

There are 24 Entities related to this resource.

Grant, Ulysses Simpson, 1822-1885

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jx9585 (person)

Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822, Point Pleasant, Ohio-died July 23, 1885, Wilton, New York) was the 18th president of the United States, serving from 1869 to 1877. As president, Grant was an effective civil rights executive who worked with the Radical Republicans during Reconstruction to protect African Americans, created the Justice Department, and reestablish the public credit. Promoted lieutenant-general, in 1864, Grant led the Union Army in winning the American Civ...

Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6n981p7 (person)

Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837) as well as a lawyer, general, and legislator. Born in the Carolinas, he served as a courier during the Revolutionary War. He read for the law during his teen years and became a lawyer in Tennessee by 1787. The first U. S. Representative for Tennessee (1796), Jackson was elected to the Senate in 1797, resigned in 1798, and served as a judge on the Tennessee Supreme Court, 1798-1804. He was later reelected to ...

Douglas, Stephen A. (Stephen Arnold), 1813-1861

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6v22v62 (person)

Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861) was an American politician and lawyer from Illinois. He was one of two Democratic Party nominees for president in the 1860 presidential election, which was won by Abraham Lincoln. Douglas had previously defeated Lincoln in the 1858 United States Senate election in Illinois, known for the Lincoln–Douglas debates. During the 1850s, Douglas was one of the foremost advocates of popular sovereignty, which held that each territory should be allowe...

Webster, Daniel, 1782-1852

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6s865sc (person)

Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore. As one of the most prominent American lawyers of the 19th century, he argued over 200 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court between 1814 and his death in 1852. During his life, he was a member of the Federalist Party, the Nati...

Cass, Lewis, 1782-1866

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w61p8qjx (person)

Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer, politician, and statesman. He represented Michigan in the United States Senate and served in the Cabinets of two U.S. Presidents, Andrew Jackson and James Buchanan. He was also the 1848 Democratic presidential nominee and a leading spokesman for the Doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, which held that the people in each territory should decide whether to permit slavery. Born in Exeter, New Hampshire, he attended Philli...

Calhoun, John C. (John Caldwell), 1782-1850

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6rp3z99 (person)

John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is remembered for strongly defending slavery and for advancing the concept of minority states' rights in politics. He did this in the context of protecting the interests of the white South when its residents were outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, mo...

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gc2thc (person)

Henry Clay Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was an American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the Senate and House. He was the seventh House speaker and the ninth secretary of state. He received electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections. He also helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party. For his role in defusing sectional crises, he earned the appellation of the "Great Compromiser" and was part of the "Grea...

Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6xq7vcc (person)

James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was an American statesman and Republican politician who represented Maine in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1863 to 1876, serving as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1869 to 1875, and then in the United States Senate from 1876 to 1881. Blaine twice served as Secretary of State (1881, 1889–1892), one of only two persons to hold the position under three separate presidents (the other being Daniel Webster), and...

Sherman, John, 1823-1900

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jj49jq (person)

Sherman was born in Lancaster, Ohio to Charles Robert Sherman and his wife, Mary Hoyt Sherman, the eighth of their 11 children. John Sherman's grandfather, Taylor Sherman, a Connecticut lawyer and judge, first visited Ohio in the early nineteenth century, gaining title to several parcels of land before returning to Connecticut. After Taylor's death in 1815, his son Charles, newly married to Mary Hoyt, moved the family west to Ohio. Several other Sherman relatives soon followed, and Charles becam...

Mckinley, William, 1843-1901

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6h23r63 (person)

President William McKinley was the 25th President of the United States. He was beginning his second term as President after winning the election in 1900. On Sept. 5, 1901 he and his wife were attending the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York when he was shot by as assassin waiting in line to shake his hand. After being attended by physicians, he was resting at the exposition's director's home in Buffalo, NY. He seemed to be recovering when his condition rapidly worsened on Sept. 14th. P...

Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x34xv4 (person)

Massachusetts lawyer and U.S. Senator, 1851-1874. He was an ardent abolitionist who attacked the south in his "crime against Kansas" speech in 1856. Two days later he was assaulted in the Senate, receiving injuries that took him years to recover from. From the description of Letters, 1858-1869. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 55768315 Born in Boston, Mass., the U.S. statesman Charles Sumner studied law at Harvard and practiced law in his native ci...

Mason, William Smith, b. 1886.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6bp2d9k (person)

Stevens, Thaddeus, 1792-1868

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60z76pk (person)

Lawyer from Pennsylvania who was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1859 and served as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. After the war, he led the Radical Republicans, opposing both Lincoln and then Andrew Johnson, endorsing military occupation of the South. When Johnson opposed ratification of the 14th Amendment, Stevens led the call for his impeachment. From the description of Letter, Dec. 7, 1865. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record i...

Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6rg6j0c (person)

Grover Cleveland, born in Caldwell, NJ, 18 March 1837; moved to Buffalo, NY in 1855; Erie County Sheriff, 1871-1874; Mayor of Buffalo, 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-1884; President of the United States, 1885-1889, 1893-1897; married Frances Folsom, 1886; died at Princeton, NJ, 24 June 1908....

Mason, William Smith, 1866-

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64754wp (person)

William Smith Mason was born in Millburn, Illinois in December, 1866. He received his Ph.B. from Yale in 1888 and his M.A. in 1924. Mason was active in the real estate and insurance business. He was the owner of a large collection of materials relating to Benjamin Franklin and a library of Revolutionary literature. Mason died in January, 1961. From the description of William Smith Mason autograph collection, 1800-1929 (inclusive). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702166208 Fro...

Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60h488d (person)

Roosevelt, 26th U.S. president, served 1901-1909. From the description of DS, 1904 March 1. : Washington, D.C. Homestead Certificate. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 15210791 26th president of the United States, 1901-1909. From the description of Theodore Roosevelt letters, 1917, 1918. (Buffalo History Museum). WorldCat record id: 213408920 Roosevelt was then Governor of New York. Chapman was one of the founders of the New York St...

Biddle, Nicholas, 1786-1844

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6cn730p (person)

Writer, politician and financier, of Pennsylvania. From the description of Nicholas Biddle letters, 1817-1840, and undated. (Duke University). WorldCat record id: 34992389 José Francisco Correia da Serra was a Portuguese scholar, naturalist and diplomat. From the guide to the José Francisco Correia da Serra letters, 1810-1823, 1810-1823, (American Philosophical Society) William Clark requested that Nicholas Biddle, scholar, statesman, and financier, writ...

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6q34p4z (person)

Martin Van Buren (b. Kinderhook, New York, December 5, 1782-d. July 24, 1862, Kinderhook, New York), studied law, was admitted to bar, New York, 1803; moved to Huson surrogate of Columbia Co.; member of State Senate, 1813-1820; attorney general of New York, 1815-1819; delegate to state constitutional convention, 1821; U.S. Senate Democrat, March 4, 1821-1828; Governor of New York, 1828-1829; U.s. Secretary of State, March 12, 1829 - August 1, 1831; Vice President, 1832; President, 1836-1840....

Welles, Gideon, 1802-1878

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6vx0gb5 (person)

A native of Glastonbury, Conn., Gideon Welles began his career as a lawyer but took up journalism as a profession, founding the Hartford Times, which he also edited, in 1826. Active in the Democratic Party in Connecticut, he served in the Connecticut state legislature and in several state offices. He later shifted his allegiance to the Republican Party due to his strong anti-slavery views and founded the Hartford Evening Press, a zealously Republican newspaper. President Abraham Lincoln appointe...

Heney, Francis Joseph, 1859-1937.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w61w51h4 (person)

Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6sb4468 (person)

Lawyer. From the description of Letter, 1845 March 4, Cincinnati, [Ohio], to Robert F. Paine, Columbus, O[hio]. (University of Toledo). WorldCat record id: 13541605 Salmon P. Chase served as the Secretary of the Treasury from 1861 to 1864. He oversaw the creation of the Bureau of Internal Revenue (1862) and implemented the introduction of the income tax and the national currency. From the description of Letter press book of the Secretary of the Treasury. 1863, Ju...

Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6f47pbn (person)

Lawyer, politician, and statesman; principle residence and law practice was in Auburn, New York; Governor of New York State, 1838-1842; United State Senator, 1849-1861; U.S. Secretary of State, 1861-1869. From the description of Collection, 1828-1936; bulk 1828-1873. (New York State Library). WorldCat record id: 50872192 New York lawyer and U.S. Senator who served as Secretary of State for Abraham Lincoln. From the description of Letters, 1852-1888. (Abraham Linc...

Knight, Jonathan, 1787-1858.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6dn6j4s (person)

Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6tz44c1 (person)

Abraham Lincoln (born February 12, 1809, Sinking Spring Farm near Hodgenville, Kentucky-died April 15, 1865, Washington, D.C.) was the sixteenth President of the United States from 1861 until his death by assassination. He was the son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Thomas Lincoln, and Nancy Hanks. In 1816, Lincoln moved to Pigeon Creek, Indiana, where he worked on his family's farm. Following his mother's death two years later, he continued working on farms until moving with his father to New Sa...