Robie-Sewall family papers, 1611-1905.

ArchivalResource

Sewall family. Robie-Sewall family papers, 1611-1905.

Robie-Sewall family papers, 1611-1905.

Papers of the Robie and Sewall families include those of Samuel Sewall (1652-1740); typed copies of letters between Jonathan Sewall and Thomas Robie, loyalists who emigrated to Canada; genealogical material; and letters among Robie and Sewall family members, among them Mary R. Sewall and her husband Joseph Sewall, Simon B. Robie, Hannah Robie, and Mehetable Higginson. The papers of Samuel E. Sewall, lawyer and abolitionist, and his wife, poet Harriet W. Sewall, contain correspondence concerning the anti-slavery movement and the causes leading to the Civil War. Among their correspondents are Lydia M. Child, Samuel J. May, Wendell Phillips, and Charles Sumner, as well as literary figures including Louisa M. Alcott, Julia W. Howe, Harriet B. Stowe, and Ralph W. Emerson. (Cont.) Also, William E. Channing's letters to Samuel E. Sewall; letters to Louisa S. Cabot from Lucy Larcom and others; letters to Charles List, first husband of Harriet Winslow, from Charles F. Adams (1807-1886); and letters of Hinton R. Helper and James F. Clarke.

2 boxes.

Related Constellations

There are 27 Constellations related to this resource.

Sewall, Harriet Winslow, 1819-1889

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6br9n9t (person)

American poet. From the description of To the unsatisfied : autograph manuscript copy of the poem signed, undated. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270665089 ...

Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6fx7gcj (person)

William Ellery Channing (1780-1842) graduated from Harvard College in 1798. He served on the board of the Harvard Corporation from 1813 to 1826, where he worked for the establishment of the Divinity School, which occurred in 1816. A Unitarian minister, Channing served as the pastor of the Federal Street Church in Boston from 1803 until his death in 1842. In 1819 he gave the landmark Unitarian sermon, Unitarian Christianity, which upon publication sold thousands of copies. A believer in the aboli...

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6d799gc (person)

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803, Boston, Massachusetts– April 27, 1882, Concord, Massachusetts), American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century....

Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6tt4qjx (person)

John Greenleaf Whittier was a wildly popular New England poet. A deeply committed and active abolitionist, he wrote many of his poems with a political agenda, although distinguished by an open-minded tolerance so often lacking in his fellow abolitionists. Although his works are somewhat marred by overtly political and overly sentimental works, the core of his output stands as fine, lyrical American verse. From the description of John Greenleaf Whittier letters, 1858 and 1876. (Pennsy...

Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66h4g1m (person)

Wendell Phillips (born November 29, 1811, Boston, Massachusetts – died February 2, 1884, Boston, Massachusetts), orator and reformer, was one of the leaders of the abolitionist movement in Boston, Massachusetts, wrote frequently for William Lloyd Garrison's Liberator, and eventually became president of the American Anti-Slavery Society. He contributed much to the cause through inflammatory speeches favoring the division of the Union and opposing the acquisition of Texas and the war with Mexico. ...

List, Charles

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6hf006n (person)

Higginson, Mehetable, 1764-1846.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6452r7s (person)

Cabot, Louisa Sewall, 1837-

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x985qt (person)

Robie, Simon Broadstreet.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6hn2034 (person)

Howe, Julia Ward, 1819-1910

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64b3354 (person)

Julia Ward Howe was the author of the Battle hymn of the republic and other works and a women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which she wrote during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. in 1861. From the description of Papers concerning the Battle hymn of the republic, 1897-1906. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 80781526 Julia Ward Howe was the author of the Battle...

Sewall, Samuel E. (Samuel Edmund), 1799-1888

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62f83dk (person)

De Coverly, Roger, Sir, 1728-1796

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6794g9f (person)

Alcott, Louisa May, 1832-1888

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60k27sn (person)

Alcott was an American author. From the description of Papers, 1849-1931. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612370872 From the description of Additional papers, 1845-1944. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122505798 From the guide to the Additional papers, 1845-1944., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University) Alcott was an American novelist and short story writer. From the description of Louisa May Alcott ad...

Robie family.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6009hqv (family)

Helper, Hinton Rowan, 1829-1909

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x63nt1 (person)

American writer and diplomat. From the description of Autograph letter signed : New York, to A.H. Rathbone, 1893 Aug. 23. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270470872 Author and diplomat. From the description of Letters of Hinton Rowan Helper, 1860-1901. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79450859 Hinton Rowan Helper, born December 27, 1829 in Davie County, North Carolina, was a Southern critic of slavery whose books inflamed the South. His objection to the syst...

Robie, Hannah.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6dp01pt (person)

Robie, Thomas, d. 1812.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mh4h43 (person)

Sewall, Mary Robie, d. 1834.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p90h61 (person)

Child, Lydia Maria, 1802-1880

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6gt5qhr (person)

Lydia Child was born in Massachusetts and became known as an abolitionist for her tract entitled, "Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans called Africans," (1833). Child's letters to the Governor of Virginia were eventually published as an abolitionist book and she also authored a novel entitled "Hobomok," a story about Indians in colonial Massachusetts. From the description of Letter, [ca. 1842]. (Temple University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 122618414 Abolitionist,...

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w63z8wtz (person)

Harriet Beecher Stowe (b. June 14, 1811, Litchfield, Connecticut – d. July 1, 1896, Hartford, Connecticut) was an American abolitionist and author. She is the daughter of Rev. Lyman Beecher who preached against slavery. She is best known for writing Uncle Tom's Cabin. It became an instant and controversial best-seller, both in the United States and abroad. The novel had a major impact on Northerners' attitudes toward slavery and by the beginning of the Civil War had sold more than a million copi...

Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66q1wgb (person)

American minister to England. From the description of Autograph letter in third person : [London], to Sir Henry Rawlinson, 1866 June 13. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270129739 Author and legislator of Boston, Mass.; minister to Great Britain. From the description of Letter of Charles Francis Adams [manuscript], 1850 November 9. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647874258 American diplomat, lawyer, and biographer; son of John Quincy Adams, 1...

Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x34xv4 (person)

Massachusetts lawyer and U.S. Senator, 1851-1874. He was an ardent abolitionist who attacked the south in his "crime against Kansas" speech in 1856. Two days later he was assaulted in the Senate, receiving injuries that took him years to recover from. From the description of Letters, 1858-1869. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 55768315 Born in Boston, Mass., the U.S. statesman Charles Sumner studied law at Harvard and practiced law in his native ci...

Larcom, Lucy, 1824-1893

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6rj4pm1 (person)

Lucy Larcom wrote poetry about women's factory life in Lowell, Mass. She was a friend and collaborator of John Greenleaf Whittier. From the description of Lucy Larcom letter, poem, and photograph, 1871-1893. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 38235776 Poet and writer, from Lowell, Mass. who attended Monticello Seminary in Godfrey, Ill. from 1849-1852, and was friends with Henry Spaulding who worked at the Surveyor General's Office in St. Louis. ...

Sewall, Samuel, 1652-1730

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6hq3zr9 (person)

Samuel Sewell was born 28 March 1652 Bishop Stoke England. He arrived in Boston 1661. He was Commissioner of the Company for the Progagation of the Gospel in New England and Parts Adjacent (1699-1730), Captain of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co., Overseer of Harvard College, Judge of Probate for Suffolk Co. (1715-1728), and Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Judicature (1718-1728). He died 1 January 1729/30 Boston MA. From the description of [Account book of Samuel Sewall,...

Sewall family.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6t24kdw (family)

Clarke, James Freeman, 1810-1888

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6rb73s9 (person)

Unitarian minister; trustee of the Boston Public Library, 1879-88; active on behalf of temperance, anti-slavery, women's sufferage movements; died in Jamaica Plain, Boston. From the description of Letters, 1863-1886. (Boston Public Library). WorldCat record id: 38003933 Clarke was a Unitarian clergyman, author, and reformer closely associated with the Transcendentalists. He was minister in Louisville, Ky. (1833-1840) and at the Church of the Disciples in Boston (1841-1850, 1...

May, Samuel J. (Samuel Joseph), 1797-1871

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jq153t (person)

Samuel May was a Unitarian clergyman of Syracuse, New York with connections to national organizations related to anti-Slavery, temperance, and suffrage, among others. From the description of Samuel J. May diary, 1867. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64691611 Samuel May was a Unitarian Clergyman of Syracuse, New York with connections to national organizations related to Freedman's Relief, Temperance, and Suffrage, among others. From the descripti...