Rutherford, Andrew 1960s-1998

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Rutherford, Andrew, 1960s-1998

Rutherford, Andrew 1960s-1998

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eng,

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Kipling, Rudyard, 1865-1936

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Joseph Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936) was an English author and poet. His best-known works include the novels and short story collections The Jungle Book (1894), Just So Stories (1902), Puck of Pook's Hill (1906), and Kim (1901), as well as a number of poems such as "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), and "If-" (1910). Kipling was born in Bombay, India, into an artistic family: his father was a sculptor, pottery designer, and professor of architectural sculpture and tw...

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Rutherford, Andrew, 1929-....

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Andrew Rutherford was born in Sutherland in 1929. He was educated at Helmsdale School, George Watson's Boys' College, the University of Edinburgh and Merton College, Oxford University. From 1952 to 1953 he served with the Seaforth Highlanders, remaining a member of the 11th Bn (TA) until 1958. Rutherford was appointed Assistant Lecturer (1955) and Lecturer in English (1956-1964) at the University of Edinburgh; in 1964 he moved to the University of Aberdeen where he was Senior Lecturer, 1964, Pro...

University of London.

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The University of London was established in 1836 out of the principle of a more inclusive approach to education, free from religious tests and more affordable. With its power to grant degrees the University worked generally in close alliance with University College and King's College London as well as numerous other colleges around Britain. In terms of degrees awarded, the University was the first in England to introduce a Bachelor of Science, tending away from the more ...

University of London, Goldsmiths' College

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