Archives of Irish America.

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The Material Culture collection compliments the entire Archives of Irish America in that its contents ... The unique format of many of the materials - hats, t-shirts, bumper stickers - provide insight to scholars and researchers in the methods used to convey information within the Irish-American community.

From the guide to the Archives of Irish America Material Culture and Ephemera Collection, 1915-2005, (Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives)

The materials in this collection were collected and assembled by the staff of the Archives of Irish America and various donors in an attempt to document the variety of materials produced by and for the Irish American community in support of and reaction to Republican activities in the United States, the Republic of Ireland, and Northern Ireland.

From the guide to the Irish Republicanism Collection, Bulk, 1970-1995, 1937-2003, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

The Vertical Files collection compliments the collections in the Archives of Irish America in that it provides information on many topics and individuals not formally represented in the collections. The unique format of many of the materials - fliers, posters, pamphlets - provide insight to scholars and researchers in the methods used to convey information within the Irish-American community.

From the guide to the Archives of Irish America Vertical Files, Bulk, 1970-2009, 1866-2009, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

The materials in this collection were collected, purchased, and assembled by the staff of the Archives of Irish America and various donors in an attempt to document the variety of pamphlets produced by and for the Irish American community.

From the guide to the Archives of Irish America Pamphlet Collection, 1843-1992, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

Emerald Societies are fraternal and family organizations whose members are of Irish American ancestry. The societies exist to promote and foster an appreciation and cultivation of the heritage and culture of the Irish American community as well as provide a common meeting place for activities and events, often charitable in nature. Societies are often found within organizations, as this collection illustrates, including the Fire Department, Departments of Police and Correctional Officers, and the Board of Education, among others. Emerald Societies exist all over the United States. This collection represents a portion of the societies in New York City and State.

From the guide to the Emerald Societies of New York Records, 1977-2004, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

The materials in this collection were collected and assembled by the staff of the Archives of Irish America and various donors in an attempt to document the variety of newspapers and other publications produced by and for the Irish American community.

From the guide to the Archives of Irish America Newspapers and Periodicals Collection, Bulk, 1964-2005, 1811-2011, (Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives)

The Consulate General of Ireland in New York City provides assistance and information to Irish citizens both visiting and living in New York including passport and visa services, authentication of documents, and advice for foreign travel. The Consulate is a branch of the Embassy of Ireland which is headquartered in Washington D.C.

From the guide to the Consulate General of Ireland Records, 1975-1998, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

The Gaelic Society of New York was one of the earliest American organizations established to promote Irish as a spoken language. It was founded in 1875, following the establishment of the Philo-Celtic Society of Boston (1873) and the Brooklyn Philo-Celtic Society (1874). The fist preliminary meeting for the Society was held on December 12, 1894 to consider the feasibility of organizing a group to promote further understanding of the language, history, antiquities, literature, music, and art of Ireland. The Society established its headquarters at 47 West 42nd Street and continued to operate in Manhattan, from offices at the City University of New York’s John Jay College, into the 1970s. Thereafter, its library moved to Mineola, New York, using space provided by the Irish American Society of Nassau, Suffolk and Queens.

Historically, Irish immigrants arriving in New York City in the 19th century were initially monoglot Irish speakers. The use of Irish in Ireland and areas of Irish immigration dramatically declined later in the century due to a variety of causes, including colonization and national education initiatives. Most first-generation New York Irish were bilingual at mid-century; thereafter English increasingly dominated, contributing to important social and economic advances among the immigrant population.

Starting around 1850, individuals and organizations began to make efforts to preserve the Irish language in New York City. Several publications, including weekly newspapers like the Irish American ran columns in Irish. In the early 1870s the Irish World encouraged native speakers to teach classes to cultivate the spoken language. Among the first organizations founded to sponsor language classes were the Philo-Celtic Society of Boston, the Brooklyn Philo-Celtic Society, and the Gaelic Society of New York. These American organizations predate the establishment of the Society for the Preservation of the Irish Language founded in Dublin, Ireland in 1876. In New York, teachers and scholars such as David O’Keefe, Michael Logan, and Daniel Magner provided instruction for students both Irish-born and Irish American.

From the guide to the Gaelic Society of New York Records, Bulk, 1894-1951, 1894-1977, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

The Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH) is a Catholic, Irish American fraternal Organization founded in New York City in 1836. The Order traces its roots back to similar societies that existed in Ireland for over 300 years beginning in the mid-16th century. While the AOH now resides in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, the United States AOH is a separate and much larger organization.

Like its early Irish predecessors, the AOH was formed to protect the welfare of its Irish-Catholic members. On May 4, 1836, the AOH in America was founded at New York's St. James Church by men emulating these Irish societies, to protect the clergy and churches from the violent American nativists who attacked Irish Catholic immigrants and Church property. At the same time the vast influx of Irish Immigrants fleeing Ireland’s Great Hunger in the late 1840's prompted a growth in many Irish societies in the USA - the largest of which was and continues to be the AOH.

Active across the United States, the Order seeks to aid the newly-arrived Irish, both socially and economically. The many Divisions and club facilities located throughout the U.S. have traditionally been among the first to welcome new Irish immigrants. Here, the Irish culture -- art, dance, music, and sports are fostered and preserved. The AOH has been at the forefront of issues concerning the Irish, such as immigration reform, economic incentives (both domestic and in Ireland), the human rights issues addressed in the MacBride Legislation, Right-To-Life, and a peaceful and just solution to the issues that divide Ireland.

The AOH in America is partitioned into Divisions, County Boards, and State Boards, and is governed by a National Board elected every two years. The Division is the basic unit in the Order, and membership in a Division is membership in the Order. Even County, State, and National Officers, maintain membership in a local Division. Annual dances, concerts, and parades sponsored by all levels of the Order raise millions for charity, while providing a showcase for the positive contributions of the Irish to every walk of American life.

The Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians is an associate organization of the AOH but was not officially recognized until 1894 in Omaha, Nebraska. The LAOH recognizes values and missions similar to AOH, and they often conduct activities together. Originally called the "Daughters of Erin," the LAOH has changed names several times up to 1984 when it became the Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians.

Sources:

http://www.aoh.com/pages/about.html

http://www.ladiesaoh.com./whoarewe.html

From the guide to the Collection on the Ancient Order of Hibernians, Bulk, 1970-2000, 1903-2008, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

James Paul [sometimes listed as Patrick] Sullivan was the third of six surviving children born to Irish immigrants Jeremiah Sullivan, a grocer, and his wife Elizabeth Flynn, who arrived in the United States in 1870 and 1875 respectively. Young J.P., or Jim, was born on February 28, 1885 and spent his early years in Manhattan where he attended P.S. 14 on East 27th Street and joined the track team of the St. Bartholomew Boys Club and, later, of the 22nd Regiment. By that time, six foot tall Jim could run a mile in 4:50. In September 1905 at the New York Metro Senior American Athletic Union Championships, Sullivan ran the mile in 4:22 creating a new American record. After impressive showings at the Canadian Championships and the New York Athletic Club Games that same month, he became known in the press as “4:22 Jim” and by March 1906 had been selected for the American Olympic team.

Athens, Greece was the site for a special international athletic meeting known as the Intercalated Games scheduled between the 1904 and 1908 Olympic years. The American Olympic team sailed from New York City on the S.S. Barbarosa on 31 March 1906 with James P. Sullivan aboard, on leave from his position as a junior clerk with the Department of Education’s Bureau of Buildings.

In Athens, Sullivan competed in the 800 meter race but did not qualify for the final. He also ran in the 1500 meter race, finishing fifth. His second place win at the Olympic Trials in Philadelphia in June 1908 made him one of thirteen members of the Irish American Athletic Club selected to represent the United States at the 1908 Olympic Games in London.

But, once again, Jim Sullivan did not bring home an Olympic medal. Nevertheless, he was part of an historic track-and-field team competing under the American flag – IAAC teammates Martin Sheridan, John J. Hayes, and Mel Sheppard, for example, brought home the gold in discus throw, Greek discus, the marathon, and the 1500 meter respectively – a team that was fêted upon their return to New York with a parade down Fifth Avenue and a reception at Sagamore Hill on Long Island with President Theodore Roosevelt.

Jim Sullivan continued running competitively until 1912, despite surgery for a tendon injury and times for the mile – like 4:24 or 4:29 – that never beat his personal best. In 1910 and 1911 his image was selected for two series of tobacco cards (Hassan and Mecca) featuring Champion Athletes and Prizefighters.

He married Grace Burke in 1913 – the daughter of Irish immigrants, Richard (a broker at the Custom House) and Mary – and they raised two children, Richard and Elise, on his job as a clerk for the Kings County Court, a position he held until 1958. James P. Sullivan died on 9 April 1965 at age 79.

From the guide to the James P. Sullivan Collection, 1905-1908, (Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives)

The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) was established in Ireland in 1884 as a part of the Gaelic Revival as a way to encourage the playing of Gaelic football and hurling. Local chapters were opened in Ireland and America throughout the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While Gaelic games had been played in America since the Irish first emigrated, play was not fully standardized until enthusiasts in New York formed the city’s first GAA Board in 1914. They also sought to organize games with teams in other cities along the East Coast. There were three fields of note in New York City for much of the twentieth century: Celtic Park in Queens, the Polo Grounds in Upper Manhattan, and Gaelic Park (a.k.a. Croke Park) in the Bronx.

One of the highlights for the New York GAA was the 1947 All-Ireland Gaelic Football Final between Cavan and Kerry. Played at the Polo Grounds, it is the only All-Ireland final played outside of Ireland. It was held in New York to commemorate 100th anniversary of the worst year of the Great Famine, and the thousands of Irish who came to New York as a consequence.

Interest in football and hurling is dependent upon immigration from Ireland and there was a slump in the 1970s. However, the 1980s revived the local GAA, as the influx of undocumented Irish brought with it new players.

From the guide to the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) of New York Collection, Bulk, 1980-2000, 1944-2005, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

Irish county organizations were first organized in New York City in the late 1840s. The early societies were for the most part purely social organizations, but in the 1870s some started to offer benefits for sickness and death. Sports teams eventually became an important component of county organizations, especially hurling and Gaelic football clubs. In the 1880s, inspired by the land reform movement in Ireland, many additional county societies were organized. Evictions and high rents were often fought on a local basis in Ireland, and in New York a county society rather than one of the broader Irish fraternal or social organizations could often respond better or faster to sudden developments in the old country. In the early 1890s the first attempt was made to establish a central body to coordinate the Irish county societies; such an organization was set up in Manhattan and at the same time a similar coordinating body was formed in Brooklyn, where many county societies existed independently. Both of these overseeing bodies were similar in design to the present-day United Irish Counties Association (UICA), but after only a few years of work the early umbrella organizations went out of existence.

A detailed and informative history of county societies in New York by John T. Ridge, Mary McMullan and Mae O'Driscoll(from which the text above was excerpted and adapted) can be found on the UICA web site, at:

http://www.uicany.org/United_Irish_Counties/History.html

From the guide to the Archives of Irish America County Societies Collection, Bulk, 1970-2001, 1906-2007, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

Irish county organizations were first organized in New York City in the late 1840s. The early societies were for the most part purely social organizations, but in the 1870s some of them started to offer benefits for sickness and death. As the Irish settled into different areas of the city, individual county societies became more prevalent. With the growth of Irish sports, these county societies were even more important. The United Irish Counties Association organized in 1904 as the Irish Counties Athletic Union, as an organization to coordinate and provide venues for sporting events and dances. The goal was to reunite the individual Irish Societies under one umbrella organization, to establish a "central unit of administration to guide and coordinate the activities of the Irish County Organizations," according to the history written by James Comerford, former President of the UICA. (See Box 3, Folder 18.) In 1907, the name was changed to United Irish Counties Association (UICA) with the aim of providing more Irish activities in addition to sports and dances. The purpose of the UICA as articulated in its incorporation papers is to "aid and encourage the members of the Irish race in this State (New York) in taking advantage of all the educational and business opportunities; to furnish information and advice to them on all matters relating to high schools, night schools, trade schools, civil service and commercial opportunities." The organization also promotes activities to preserve and promote the traditional culture if the Irish. This is realized in the Feis, an annual celebration of Irish music, dance, song and athletics.

For more information, visit: http://www.uicany.org/United_Irish_Counties/History.html

From the guide to the United Irish Counties Association Records, 1931-2007, (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf James P. Sullivan Collection, 1905-1908 Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
creatorOf Archives of Irish America Vertical Files, Bulk, 1970-2009, 1866-2009 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) of New York Collection, Bulk, 1980-2000, 1944-2005 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Gaelic Society of New York Records, Bulk, 1894-1951, 1894-1977 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf United Irish Counties Association Records, 1931-2007 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Irish Republicanism Collection, Bulk, 1970-1995, 1937-2003 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Archives of Irish America Pamphlet Collection, 1843-1992 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Archives of Irish America Newspapers and Periodicals Collection, Bulk, 1964-2005, 1811-2011 Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
creatorOf Archives of Irish America County Societies Collection, Bulk, 1970-2001, 1906-2007 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Collection on the Ancient Order of Hibernians, Bulk, 1970-2000, 1903-2008 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Archives of Irish America Material Culture and Ephemera Collection, 1915-2005 Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
creatorOf Consulate General of Ireland Records, 1975-1998 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Emerald Societies of New York Records, 1977-2004 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Adams, Gerry, 1948- person
associatedWith AE, 1867-1935 person
associatedWith American Conference for Irish Studies. American Committee for Irish Studies. corporateBody
associatedWith American Ireland Fund, The. corporateBody
associatedWith American-Irish Historical Society. corporateBody
associatedWith American Irish Unity Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Ancient Order of Hibernians. corporateBody
associatedWith Boston College. corporateBody
associatedWith Catholic Church corporateBody
associatedWith Claidheamh Soluis (New York, N.Y.). corporateBody
associatedWith Clan-na-Gael. corporateBody
associatedWith Columbia University. corporateBody
associatedWith Connolly, James, 1868-1916 person
associatedWith Cork Workers' Club. corporateBody
associatedWith Cudahy, John J., 1920- person
associatedWith Dail Eireann. corporateBody
associatedWith De Valera, Eamon, 1882-1975 person
associatedWith Diana, Princess of Wales, 1961-1997 person
associatedWith Doherty, Joseph Patrick, 1955- person
associatedWith Emerald Isle Immigration Center. corporateBody
associatedWith Flannery, Michael, 1902-1994 person
associatedWith Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. corporateBody
associatedWith Gaelic Athletic Association. corporateBody
associatedWith Gilroy, John G. person
associatedWith Glucksman Ireland House. New York University. corporateBody
associatedWith Goulding, Cathal, 1922-1998 person
associatedWith Gralton, Jimmy, 1886-1945 person
associatedWith Ireland. Consulate General (New York, N.Y.). corporateBody
associatedWith Irish America. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish American Athletic Club. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish American Building Society. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish American Cultural Institute. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish American Unity Conference. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish echo. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish echo (Boston, Mass. : 1981). corporateBody
associatedWith Irish Northern Aid. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish Northern Aid Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish Republican Army. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish Republican Information Service. corporateBody
associatedWith Irish Transport & General Workers' Union . corporateBody
associatedWith Irish voice (New York, N.Y.) . corporateBody
associatedWith Irish world. corporateBody
associatedWith Kennedy, Edward M. (Edward Moore), 1932-2009 person
associatedWith Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963 person
associatedWith Knights of Columbus. corporateBody
associatedWith Larkin, James, 1876-1947 person
associatedWith Mackin, Sean person
associatedWith McAliskey, Bernadette Devlin, 1947- person
associatedWith McAliskey, Roisin. person
associatedWith Moynihan, Daniel P. (Daniel Patrick), 1927-2003 person
associatedWith Nation, The. corporateBody
associatedWith New Ireland Forum. corporateBody
associatedWith O'Casey, Sean, 1880-1964 person
associatedWith O'Hara, Maureen, 1920- person
associatedWith O'Neill, Tip person
associatedWith O'Reilly, Gerald, 1903-1990 person
associatedWith Quinn, Bill person
associatedWith Russell, George William, 1867-1935 person
associatedWith Sands, Bobby, d. 1981 person
associatedWith Sheehy-Skeffington, Francis, 1878-1916 person
associatedWith Sinn Fein. corporateBody
associatedWith Socialist Labor Party. corporateBody
associatedWith Spirit of Freedom. corporateBody
associatedWith Sullivan, James P., 1885-1965 person
associatedWith The Irish people. corporateBody
associatedWith U2 (Musical group) . corporateBody
associatedWith United Irish Counties Association of N.Y. corporateBody
associatedWith World of Hibernia. corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
Ireland |x Politics and government |y 20th century.
Ireland |x History |y 20th century
England.
San Francisco (Calif.)
Ireland |x History |y Easter Rising, 1916
Northern Ireland |x History |y 1969-1994.
Chicago (Ill.)
Subject
Hunger strikes--Northern Ireland
Irish Americans--Newspapers
Bloody Sunday, Derry, Northern Ireland, 1972
Human rights--Ireland
Irish Americans--New York (State)--New York--Politics and government
Gaelic football
Irish Americans--Social life and customs
Irish Americans--Societies, etc
Feis
Irish Americans
Occupation
Function

Corporate Body

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