California State University, Dominguez Hills

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The Southland Corporation was founded in Dallas, Texas in 1927, when their retail ice outlets sold milk, bread and eggs. Today, Southland is the world's largest operator and franchisor of convenience stores, the 13th largest retailer in the United States, with 7,033 7-Eleven stores in the U.S.A. and Canada. Southland's subsidiaries include the Chief Auto Parts stores and Adohr Farms. In the beginning stages of planning for the Los Angeles 1984 Olympics, Jere Thompson, president of the Southland Corporation went to the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee's president, Peter Ueberroth, and said they wanted to be involved. Ueberroth recommended funding of the velodrome. Even though the principals knew little about cycling, Southland liked the idea in tying the concept of bicycling to 7-Eleven stores. The sites considered were: CSU, Dominguez Hills, Harbor College, Wilmington, CSU, Northridge, Claremont Men's College and the City of San Diego. Factors in the site selection were: site and soil suitability, accessibility to major and surface arteries, proximity to major utilities, lowest total construction cost and shortest completion schedule. CSU, Dominguez Hills was able to add to their proposal the donation of a 6.5 acre parcel to the LAOOC for the velodrome, and their Board of Trustees authorized construction in their November, 1980 meeting. On February 5, 1981, CSU, Dominguez Hills was awarded the Olympic Velodrome. The Olympic Velodrome is the only world class cycling track in western United States and the only one in the world on a university campus. Velodrome specification include: length, 333.33 meters (1,093 ft.); width, 7 meters (23 feet); bank turns, 33 degrees; attainable speeds up to 72 kilometers (47 miles) per hour; permanent seating, 2,000; Olympic seating capacity, 8,000 and velodrome surface of poured concrete track on concrete fill. The cost of the velodrome was $3 million, and the contractor: Stolte, Inc. Groundbreaking ceremonies took place on July 9, 1981 at the construction site. The ceremonies were kicked off at 10:15am with a race between Eric Heiden and challengers from the media, followed by a 10-lap club race by The South, Bay Wheelmen. Visitors from the Southland Corporation, Stolte Corporation officials and representatives from LAOOC were present. On May 10, 1982, the International Cycling Federation Certification (FIAC) was received. The first trial high speed run performed by Jack Simes, 3-time U.S. Olympic Cycling team member and 2-time team coach, occurred on January 21, 1982. The grand opening occurred July 8, 1982 with Eric Heiden (1980 Lake Placid 5 Gold Medal winner for speedskating) and Sheila Ochowicz (1976 Winter Games-Innsbruck, Gold Medal winner of 500 meter speedskating), cycling the first official lap. The grand opening ceremony was a three day event with July 9 and 10 devoted to the Grand Prix Finals. 3,000 people attended, including Sam, the Eagle the official XXIII Olympiad mascot. The Grand Prix Finals were a series of bicycle track events to improve American cyclists at the international level. Emphasis was placed on Olympic track events, match sprints, individual pursuit, the kilometer and the points race. September 17 and 18, 1982 the SCCF 20th Annual Far West Championships were held at the completed velodrome, and October 3, 1982 the 8th International Human Powered Speed Championships were held. This event was held specifically for the unique pedal-powered vehicles. Among the many uses envisioned for the velodrome by the university are developmental classes and training, maintenance exercise/conditioning and cycling as a means of cardiac rehabilitation. Aspects of research related to sports medicine could lead to degrees in biomechanics, medical technology, sports and recreation with cycling emphasis. Public use time and races, both professional and amateur will be available. Goals include: to establish the most important collegiate center of cycling in the U.S.A.; development of cycling as a national sport and a youth cycling program. Auxilliary uses can be made of the infield for speed soccer games, volleyball, concerts and other entertainment. When the 1984 Olympics conclude, the Southland Corporation will donate the velodrome to the university. In order to continue their plans and development of the velodrome, the university has established a Foundation which will be responsible for operating and raising funds to run the velodrome whose costs are now estimated at $100,000 per year to run. (1983).

From the description of Olympic Velodrome Collection, 1979-1995 (California State University, Dominguez Hills). WorldCat record id: 683258023

California State University Dominguez Hills was established by the legislature of the state of California in 1960 as a branch of the California State College system to serve southwest Los Angeles. Its first name, South Bay State College, was chosen to reflect that orientation. Its first president, Leo F. Cain, was appointed in January, 1962, and consulting architect and the college planning staff were appointed later that year.

The process of selecting a site took over five years. Suggestions for possible sites were solicited and the responses were such that, at one time or another, over forty possible sites were considered. The major early contenders for the college were the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the City of Torrance, and the Fox Hills area near Culver City. Disputes over the relative merits and drawbacks of these and other sites involved local city councils, businessmen, citizens' groups, the State College Trustees, local State Senators and the college's planning staffs. Reports and counter-reports, resolutions and counter-resolutions, charges and counter-charges, and reams of correspondence for and against various sites bear witness to the heat of the controversy. The press had a field day. It was not until the fall of 1965, when the college, now named California State College at Palos Verdes, had already opened to a limited number of students in rented facilities on the Palos Verdes Peninsula that the Dominguez Hills site, a relatively new contender, was selected. Beginning this collection and providing considerable aid in sorting out the tangle of events through 1965 are chronological histories of the site selection process compiled by the college planning staff. In addition to material documenting controversial issues and wide citizen involvement in the site selection debate, the collection contains considerable material, mostly in the form of site reports, illustrating the importance of geographic, demographic, seismological, transportational, economic, political, social, and even aesthetic considerations employed in efforts to influence the decision of the Trustees. Also included are documents concerning the acquisition of the Dominguez Hills site, including numerous maps and photographs of the site.

From the description of Campus Site Selection Documents, 1960-1968 (California State University, Dominguez Hills). WorldCat record id: 681924748

Dr. Robert C. Detweiler came to CSU Dominguez Hills in 1989 after serving for four years as Vice President of Academic Affairs at CSU San Bernardino. Prior to that, he was a Professor of History and Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at San Diego State University.

Dr. Detweiler's educational background includes a baccalaureate in Social Science from Humboldt State University, an M.A. in History from San Francisco State University and a Ph.D in History from the University of Washington. His graduate work and subsequent professional publications focused primarily on the American Revolution and the origins of slavery and racism in America. During Dr. Detweiler's term as President at CSUDH enrollment rose from 8000 to over 12,000 students, fund-raising monies jumps from $500,000 to $3.5 million and university grants rose from $2.5 million to nearly $9 million. The California Academy of Math and Science, a magnet school for gifted and high-ability high school students, was built on campus. Other ties to the K-12 campuses in the community were the Challenger Learning Center and the California International Business Academy at Gardena High School. Dr. Detweiler ended his term by resigning effective June 1998. Following his years at CSU Dominguez Hills, he served as vice president and provost at California Polytechnic State University, where he currently teaches. He has also been active throughout his career working with community service organizations such as the Red Cross, YMCA, and United Way, among others.

From the description of CSUDH President's Office - Detweiler (Robert C.) Papers (California State University, Dominguez Hills). WorldCat record id: 681925239

Planning the curriculum and physical facilities for what would become California State University Dominguez Hills began in 1962 with the appointment of the college planning staff and campus architect. Background sources were collected, data gathered, consultants brought in, and reports compiled in preparation for devising an academic (or curriculum) master plan and for determining the educational specifications for physical facilities.

Academic master planning took several years and numerous versions and revisions of the plan appeared between 1962 and the opening of the college in the fall of 1965. The strong interest of the planning staff in experimental and innovative instruction and curriculum culminated in the diversified major and small college proposals. The facilities master planning staff, which included A. Quincy Jones, the consulting architect, devised educational specifications for college buildings and architectural master plans, one for a Palos Verdes campus in 1964 and another for the Dominguez Hills campus in 1967. Planning for both academic and physical plant development was complicated by a delay of several years in selecting a permanent site for the campus. The Dominguez Hills site was not selected until fall 1965, when the college had already opened with a limited number of students in rented facilities on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, where it had been assumed that the college would be permanently located. When the decision to place the campus in Carson was made, it was decided to move the temporary campus closer to the site of the permanent campus; after investigation of possible rental facilities it was arranged that in fall 1966, the campus would move to a building leased from the Watt Construction Co. (the Watt Campus) across the street from the permanent site and gradually, as buildings were completed on the permanent site, transfer the campus to the permanent site. This transfer was completed by fall 1972.

From the description of Academic And Facilities Master Planning/Early History Documents (California State University, Dominguez Hills). WorldCat record id: 681935435

The 25th Anniversary Celebration was organized to observe the 25th anniversary of the 1960 California State Legislature's authorization for the establishment of a college in the South Bay area of Los Angeles County. This campus was later named the California State University Dominguez Hills. The Anniversary was celebrated during the academic year of 1985/86 with a number of continuing events including lecture series, concerts, school showcase weeks. The year was climaxed in April 1986 with the Silver Salue Dinner.

A Steering Committee was established in January 1984 to coordinate the development and implementation of a program of events for the celebration. The 1984 members included the following people: Dr. Hansonia Caldwell, Chair of the Committee; Dr. Margaret Blue, alumna; John Briner, staff; Dr. Richard Butwell, CSUDH President, honorary; Dr. Donald Gerth, honorary; Dr. Judson Grenier, faculty; Vera Bilbrew, alumna; Dr. Leo Cain, honorary; Dr. Lois Chi, emeritus; Honorable Ralph Dills, Legislator; Dr. Peter Ellis, faculty; Dr. Lyle E. Gibson, honorary; Dr. Marvin Laser, emeritus; Dr. Donald MacPhee, Administration; Blair McDonald, student; Gilbert Smith, Univ. Advisory Board. After September 1985, additional committee members included: Robert Beverly, State Senator; Katy Geissert, Univ. Advisory Board; Dr. Harold Charnofsky, faculty; Ellen Gerry, Univ. Academic Senate; John Hollaway, student; Dr. David Karber, Administration; Dennis McCarbery, alumnus; Dr. Milo Milfs, emeritus; Lisa Stevens, student; Dr. Kosaku Yoshida, faculty. A Task Force was created by the Committee in October 1984 to coordinate the planning of the anniversary celebration. The original members inluded: Dr. Hansonia Caldwell, Chair of Task Force; Dr. Sharon Bassett, Administrative Fellow; Dr. Joe Braun, Assc. Dean of Extended Education; Margaret Coda-Messerle, Adminstration; Larry Gray, Student Development; Arnold Haskin, faculty; Nancy Lichina, Alumni Affairs/University Relations; Fran Pullera, University Relations; Sue Carberry, faculty; Dr. James Cooper, faculty; Raul Aceves, University Relations. Later additions to the Task Force included: Margaret Blue; Victoria Hwang; Larry McClelland; R. Bruce Parham, University Archivist; Cindy Q. Young, Director of Development.

From the description of 25th Anniversary, California State University Dominguez Hills (California State University, Dominguez Hills). WorldCat record id: 681592435

History

California State University Dominguez Hills was established by the legislature of the state of California in 1960 as a branch of the California State College system to serve southwest Los Angeles. Its first name, South Bay State College, was chosen to reflect that orientation. Its first president, Leo F. Cain, was appointed in January, 1962, and consulting architect and the college planning staff were appointed later that year.

The process of selecting a site took over five years. Suggestions for possible sites were solicited and the responses were such that, at one time or another, over forty possible sites were considered. The major early contenders for the college were the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the City of Torrance, and the Fox Hills area near Culver City. Disputes over the relative merits and drawbacks of these and other sites involved local city councils, businessmen, citizens' groups, the State College Trustees, local State Senators and the college's planning staffs. Cities and civic groups filed resolutions on behalf of some site (and against other sites), and there were vigorous letter-writing campaigns trying to sway officials who would be making the decision. Even before the final decision was made, the college, now named California State College at Palos Verdes, opened to a limited number of students in rented facilities on the Palos Verdes Peninsula in the fall of 1965. Soon thereafter, Dominguez Hills, a relatively new contender, was selected as the permanent campus site.

The planning of the curriculum and physical facilities for what would become California State University Dominguez Hills mirrored the struggle to find a permanent campus. Planning for both began in 1962 with the appointment of the college planning staff and campus architect. Background sources were collected, data gathered, consultants brought in, and reports compiled in preparation for devising an academic (or curriculum) master plan and for determining the educational specifications for physical facilities.

Academic master planning took several years. Numerous versions and revisions of the plan appeared between 1962 and the opening of the college in the fall of 1965. The strong interest of the planning staff in experimental and innovative instruction and curriculum culminated in the diversified major and small college proposals. The facilities master planning staff, which included A. Quincy Jones, the consulting architect, devised educational specifications for college buildings and architectural master plans, one for a Palos Verdes campus in 1964 and another for the Dominguez Hills campus in 1967.

Planning for both academic and physical plant development was complicated by the delay in selecting a permanent site for the campus. With the decision to locate the permanent campus on the Dominguez Hills site in Carson, the college decided to move the temporary campus closer to the site of the permanent campus. After investigating a number of possible rental facilities, the campus was moved to a building leased from the Watt Construction Co. (the Watt Campus) across the street from the permanent site. Gradually, as buildings were completed on the permanent site, operations transferred to the permanent site. This transfer was completed by fall 1972

From the guide to the California State University Dominguez Hills Master Planning / Site Selection Collection, 1958-1984, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

The Southland Corporation was founded in Dallas, Texas in 1927, when their retail ice outlets sold milk, bread and eggs. Today, Southland is the world's largest operator and franchisor of convenience stores, the 13th largest retailer in the United States, with 7,033 7-Eleven stores in the U.S.A. and Canada. Southland's subsidiaries include the Chief Auto Parts stores and Adohr Farms.

In the beginning stages of planning for the Los Angeles 1984 Olympics, Jere Thompson, president of the Southland Corporation went to the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee's president, Peter Ueberroth, and said they wanted to be involved. Ueberroth recommended funding of the velodrome. Even though the principals knew little about cycling, Southland liked the idea in tying the concept of bicycling to 7-Eleven stores. The sites considered were: CSU, Dominguez Hills, Harbor College, Wilmington, CSU, Northridge, Claremont Men's College and the City of San Diego. Factors in the site selection were: site and soil suitability, accessibility to major and surface arteries, proximity to major utilities, lowest total construction cost and shortest completion schedule. CSU, Dominguez Hills was able to add to their proposal the donation of a 6.5 acre parcel to the LAOOC for the velodrome, and their Board of Trustees authorized construction in their November, 1980 meeting. On February 5, 1981, CSU, Dominguez Hills was awarded the Olympic Velodrome.

The Olympic Velodrome is the only world class cycling track in western United States and the only one in the world on a university campus. Velodrome specification include: length, 333.33 meters (1,093 ft.); width, 7 meters (23 feet); bank turns, 33 degrees; attainable speeds up to 72 kilometers (47 miles) per hour; permanent seating, 2,000; Olympic seating capacity, 8,000 and velodrome surface of poured concrete track on concrete fill. The cost of the velodrome was $3 million, and the contractor: Stolte, Inc.

Groundbreaking ceremonies took place on July 9, 1981 at the construction site. The ceremonies were kicked off at 10:15am with a race between Eric Heiden and challengers from the media, followed by a 10-lap club race by The South, Bay Wheelmen. Visitors from the Southland Corporation, Stolte Corporation officials and representatives from LAOOC were present. On May 10, 1982, the International Cycling Federation Certification (FIAC) was received. The first trial high speed run performed by Jack Simes, 3-time U.S. Olympic Cycling team member and 2-time team coach, occurred on January 21, 1982.

The grand opening occurred July 8, 1982 with Eric Heiden (1980 Lake Placid 5 Gold Medal winner for speedskating) and Sheila Ochowicz (1976 Winter Games-Innsbruck, Gold Medal winner of 500 meter speedskating), cycling the first official lap. The grand opening ceremony was a three day event with July 9 and 10 devoted to the Grand Prix Finals. 3,000 people attended, including Sam, the Eagle the official XXIII Olympiad mascot. The Grand Prix Finals were a series of bicycle track events to improve American cyclists at the international level. Emphasis was placed on Olympic track events, match sprints, individual pursuit, the kilometer and the points race.

September 17 and 18, 1982 the SCCF 20th Annual Far West Championships were held at the completed velodrome, and October 3, 1982 the 8th International Human Powered Speed Championships were held. This event was held specifically for the unique pedal-powered vehicles.

Among the many uses envisioned for the velodrome by the university are developmental classes and training, maintenance exercise/conditioning and cycling as a means of cardiac rehabilitation. Aspects of research related to sports medicine could lead to degrees in biomechanics, medical technology, sports and recreation with cycling emphasis. Public use time and races, both professional and amateur will be available. Goals include: to establish the most important collegiate center of cycling in the U.S.A.; development of cycling as a national sport and a youth cycling program. Auxilliary uses can be made of the infield for speed soccer games, volleyball, concerts and other entertainment.

When the 1984 Olympics conclude, the Southland Corporation will donate the velodrome to the university. In order to continue their plans and development of the velodrome, the university has established a Foundation which will be responsible for operating and raising funds to run the velodrome whose costs are now estimated at $100,000 per year to run. (1983).

From the guide to the Olympic Velodrome Collection, 1979-, (Department of Archives and Special Collections. University Library. California State Library, Dominguez Hills.)

Background

The 25th Anniversary Celebration was organized to observe the 25th anniversary of the 1960 California State Legislature's authorization for the establishment of a college in the South Bay area of Los Angeles County. This campus was later named the California State University Dominguez Hills. The Anniversary was celebrated during the academic year of 1985/86 with a number of continuing events including lecture series, concerts, school showcase weeks. The year was climaxed in April 1986 with the Silver Salue Dinner.

A Steering Committee was established in January 1984 to coordinate the development and implementation of a program of events for the celebration. The 1984 members included the following people:

prominently mentioned in these papers Dr. Hansonia Caldwell, Chair of the Committee Dr. Margaret Blue, alumna John Briner, staff Dr. Richard Butwell, CSUDH President, honorary Dr. Donald Gerth, honorary Dr. Judson Grenier, faculty Vera Bilbrew, alumna Dr. Leo Cain, honorary Dr. Lois Chi, emeritus Honorable Ralph Dills, Legislator Dr. Peter Ellis, faculty Dr. Lyle E. Gibson, honorary Dr. Marvin Laser, emeritus Dr. Donald MacPhee, Administration Blair McDonald, student Gilbert Smith, Univ. Advisory Board

After September 1985, additional committee members included:

prominently mentioned Robert Beverly, State Senator Katy Geissert, Univ. Advisory Board Dr. Harold Charnofsky, faculty Ellen Gerry, Univ. Academic Senate John Hollaway, student Dr. David Karber, Administration Dennis McCarbery, alumnus Dr. Milo Milfs, emeritus Lisa Stevens, student Dr. Kosaku Yoshida, fauculty

A Task Force was created by the Committee in October 1984 to coordinate the planning of the anniversary celebration. The original members inluded:

prominently mentioned Dr. Hansonia Caldwell, Chair of Task Force Dr. Sharon Bassett, Administrative Fellow Dr. Joe Braun, Assc. Dean of Extended Education Margaret Coda-Messerle, Adminstration Larry Gray, Student Development Arnold Haskin, faculty Nancy Lichina, Alumni Affairs/University Relations Fran Pullera, University Relations Sue Carberry, faculty Dr. James Cooper, faculty Raul Aceves, University Relations Later additions to the Task Force included: Margaret Blue Victoria Hwang Larry McClelland R. Bruce Parham, University Archivist Cindy Q. Young, Director of Development Names also prominantly mentioned in these papers are: Louis D. Armand, President, Associated Students Dr. Joan Fenton, Dean, Social and Behavioral Sciences Kenneth W. Finley, Asst, V.P. University Relations Pamela Hammand, Director of Public Affairs and Publications Robert Jones, University Relations Douglas W. Spangler, Assc. V.P., University Relations.

From the guide to the 25th Anniversary, California State University Dominguez Hills, 1983-1986, (Department of Archives and Special Collections. University Library. California State Library, Dominguez Hills.)

History

This collection was created by combining two Compton collections: the Compton History Collection and the Heritage House Collection. Much of the materials in the Compton History Collection were donated by Robert Gillingham. The Heritage House Museum donated their papers and historical materials to the archive when they closed in the late 1970s.

The City of Compton lies within the original boundaries of the Rancho San Pedro, granted to the Dominguez family. In 1866, Francis Temple and Fielding Gibson purchased a tract of land north of the Dominguez homestead. This land, known as the Temple and Gibson Tract, was subdivided and lots were purchased by Harmon Higgins in 1866 and a group of pioneers led by G.D. Compton in 1867. The city was first incorporated in 1888 and again in 1909, with Clarence Dickison as mayor. In 1969, Compton elected its first African-American mayor, Douglas Dollarhide.

From the guide to the Compton History Collection, 1869-1998, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

In 1984, Los Angeles hosted the Games of the XXIII Olympiad and the cycling events were held at the velodrome on the campus of CSU Dominguez Hills. To celebrate the games and the participation of CSUDH, the Department of Archives and Special Collections put together an exhibit of photographs and documents from the first time Los Angeles hosted the Olympic Games - the Games of the X Olympiad in 1932.

From the guide to the 1932 Olympics Exhibit Collection, 1932, 1984, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

The South Bay Photos Collection was created from the photographs originally collected in the Compton History Collection, the Heritage House Collection, and the South Bay History Collection. Many of the photos are assumed to be from the collections of Robert Gillingham and other local historians of Compton and the South Bay. These photographs were then arranged to parallel the South Bay History and Compton History Collections.

The South Bay is defined in this collection as the area south of the Los Angeles International Airport and the Glenn Anderson Freeway (CA 105) and west of the San Gabriel River Freeway (CA 605). Generally, the cities in this collection are within the borders of the Rancho San Pedro land grant, made in 1784.

From the guide to the South Bay Photo Collection, circa 1880-1967, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

California State University Dominguez Hills was established in 1960 and is currently located on land once part of the historic Rancho San Pedro, the oldest land grant in Los Angeles. Through its development the University has flourished establishing itself as a major commuter University for Southern Los Angeles and Northern Orange County geographic region. Today the University attendance stands around 13,000 students. The content of this collection documents the increasing use of visual media by students, staff, faculty, local and national news media and other entities to broadcast academic shows, increase University exposure and document important University events. This collection can be used as a forum for the many changes the university has experienced from the late 1970s to the early 2000s.

From the guide to the California State University, Dominguez Hills Video Collections, 1973-2006, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

The collection consists of 113 newspaper and journal titles, published between 1953 and 1994, though the majority of the collection was published between 1969 and 1992. The newspapers all report from a leftist perspective and many of the publications espouse a Communist ideology. Topics relating to many of the major movements of the late 20th Century are covered, including the Anti-War Movement, the Black Movement, the Chicano Movement, and the Feminist Movement. As many of the publications relate to Communist ideology, there is a great focus on labor issues and the plight of the working class in the United States. These Communist publications largely report on issues in the United States, though they also report on world happenings, including coverage of Cuba. Many of the journals offered extensive coverage relating to the death of Mao Zedung in 1976.

From the guide to the Political Newspapers Collection, 1953-1994, bulk 1969-1992, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

The South Bay History Collection is an artificial collection created by the archives to house materials relating to the history of the South Bay. Materials in this collection were donated by local historians, the University Library, and archival staff.

In this collection, the South Bay is defined as the area south of the Los Angeles International Airport and the Glenn Anderson Freeway (CA 105) and west of the San Gabriel River Freeway (CA 605). Generally, the cities in this collection are within the borders of the Rancho San Pedro land grant, made in 1784.

From the guide to the South Bay History Collection, 1923-2005, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History of the Rancho San Pedro

The materials in the Rancho San Pedro Collection document the history and development of the Rancho San Pedro, one of the original Spanish California land grants. Juan Jose Dominguez, a soldier in the King’s army, received the Southern California land grant in 1784, largely as a reward for his years of service in California. Unlike many original owners of Spanish grants, Dominguez and his heirs managed to retain ownership of the Rancho San Pedro through the decades as California moved from Spanish to Mexican to United States rule. Of over seventy Spanish and Mexican land grants, the Rancho San Pedro was the first to be granted a clear patent by the United States government.

In its original form, the grant given to Juan Jose Dominguez comprised over 75,000 acres, extending from San Pedro Harbor to the Palos Verdes Peninsula, then eastward as far as modern-day Lynwood. Following Juan Jose’s death, the Dominguez family had to constantly fight off legal challenges to their ownership of the Rancho. A complex arrangement with the Sepulveda family allowed them to claim a large portion of the property; after several court decisions and appeals, over 31,000 acres of Palos Verdes land was awarded to the Sepulvedas in 1846. By 1858, following further land sales and purchases, the size of the Rancho San Pedro was approximately 26,000 acres. In that year, the U.S. government granted the Dominguez family a patent for the land, establishing them as owners of the Rancho San Pedro under United States law. Rancho San Pedro land, as described by the patent, was bounded by the modern-day cities of Long Beach, Wilmington, Compton, and Redondo Beach.

Juan Jose Dominguez built a home and herded cattle on the property until his death in 1809. When Juan Jose died childless, primary ownership of the land passed to his nephew, Jose Cristobal Dominguez, who held the land until 1825. After his death, the land was divided among his six children. In addition to managing the Rancho, the oldest son, Manuel, began to purchase the land left to his brothers and sisters. He ultimately consolidated ownership of the entire Rancho San Pedro, and he would remain owner for almost sixty years. In addition to being a major property owner Rancho, Manuel Dominguez became a prominent figure as the nearby settlement of Los Angeles moved from being a small pueblo to a frontier town to a thriving city. Dominguez held a number of public positions in Los Angeles, including mayor, justice of the peace, and supervisor, and he was a delegate to the first California constitutional convention in 1849. During this time, Manuel Dominguez created a relationship between the Rancho San Pedro and the city of Los Angeles that would continue long after his death in 1882.

When Manuel Dominguez died, the land passed first to his wife; following her death a short time later, the land of the Rancho San Pedro was divided among his six daughters: Ana Josefa Juliana Dominguez de Guyer, Guadalupe Marcelina Dominguez, Dolores Simona Dominguez de Watson, Maria Victoria Dominguez de Carson, Susana Delfina Dominguez del Amo, and Maria Jesus de los Reyes Dominguez de Francis. After initial efforts at determining equitable land distribution among the sisters failed, the family asked the Los Angeles Superior Court to evaluate and formally partition the land. This partition, which went into effect in 1885, divided the Rancho according to a complicated scheme giving the daughters not merely equal amounts of land, but equitable types of acreage (farmland, river land, swamp, oceanfront, etc.), meaning that each daughter owned pieces of land throughout the Rancho.

With this division of the Rancho San Pedro lands, the business interests became increasingly diverse. Some companies, such as the Dominguez Estate Company and Dominguez Water Company, were formed in service to the entire Rancho, while others served interests of specific families, such as the Watson Land Company, the Francis Land Company, the Del Amo Estate Company, and the Carson Estate Company. Even when the Dominguez heirs formed separate companies, however, these companies remained tightly interconnected, with members of the extended family often serving on boards or as executives. In some cases, as with lawyer Henry O’Melveny or Chief Engineer George Hand, employees, lawyers, and advisors performed services for multiple family-related companies at the same time.

The land’s proximity to Los Angeles, Los Angeles harbor, and ever-growing neighboring cities made it inevitable that the Rancho San Pedro would be inextricably linked with them. In 1912 Los Angeles purchased the “Shoestring Strip,” a narrow strip of land running through the Rancho San Pedro, thus creating a viable link between Los Angeles and its harbor. The rail line constructed on the Shoestring Strip allowed traffic to and from the port and opened the door to the region’s explosive industrial growth in the twentieth century. As the cities surrounding the Rancho San Pedro grew, it was inevitable that the heirs of Manuel Dominguez would need to negotiate easements, rights of way, and municipal and industrial property rights. In 1925-1928, the City of Long Beach attempted to annex both Davidson City, a development on the eastern side of the Rancho, along with nearby Rancho properties. The various Dominguez family-related companies worked together to defeat the initiative, even threatening to incorporate Davidson City a separate city. Oil companies operating on the Rancho San Pedro joined forces with the family companies, and the move to annex Davidson City was defeated by a narrow margin.

The Rancho San Pedro was initially devoted solely to ranching. While the various companies diversified the focus of the Dominguez heirs to include nurseries, real estate, and water management, tenant farming remained a vital part of Rancho San Pedro life throughout the first half of the century. Tenant farmers on Rancho lands included a large number who were of Japanese or Chinese descent. From the California Alien Land Act of 1913 to the evacuation of the Japanese during World War II, these tenants faced laws restricting where they lived and their right to lease land. Tenants and the Rancho landlords dealt with a number of issues related to the laws, including gathering birth certificates or other documents to prove tenants’ American citizenship, or writing letters of recommendation on tenants’ behalf to War Relocation Boards.

In the early decades of the twentieth century, the lands around the Rancho San Pedro were found to be oil rich. In 1920, oil was discovered first on property belonging to the Del Amo family, and the first producing oil well was drilled there in 1921. This opened the door to oil exploration throughout the Rancho San Pedro, and before long the Rancho became one of the major petroleum centers in the United States, with over twenty oil companies holding oil production leases on Dominguez family lands.

At the same time that the oil industry was discovering the Rancho San Pedro, the influence of other Dominguez family businesses was extending beyond the borders of the Rancho. While the Dominguez Water Company was originally formed to generate the water needs of the Rancho and nearby Compton, it was reincorporated as the Dominguez Water Company in 1937 and become a public utility in 1940. With its connection to the Los Angeles Metropolitan Water District, the Dominguez Water Corporation helped fuel the explosive growth of both residential and industrial centers in and around Los Angeles. From the late 1920s to the 1950s, other affiliated companies, such as the Dominguez-Wilshire Corporation and the Beverly-Arnaz Company, were important in developing and vitalizing business districts and some of the first major subdivisions in Los Angeles.

From its origins in agriculture to its growing involvement in oil, water, industry, and residential development, the history of the Rancho San Pedro parallels that of Southern California itself, and the Dominguez family-related companies helped steer many of the economic forces that shaped the region throughout the twentieth century.

Company Histories

The Rancho San Pedro Collection contains records documenting a number of Dominguez family-related companies. While they existed in the context of the Rancho San Pedro, and they were inextricably bound to each other, they were also nonetheless organized as separate entities. A brief history of each follows:

Dominguez Estate Company

The will of Ana Josefa Juliana Dominguez de Guyer divided her estate among her sisters. The sisters decided to form a corporation that would manage the de Guyer estate, with each sister receiving equal shares. The Dominguez Estate Company was incorporated in 1910. Dominguez daughter Marcelina also donated her share of Rancho holdings to the Dominguez Estate Company a year before her death in 1913. Headed by Henry O’Melveny, the Dominguez Estate Company became the largest and most diverse of the family-related companies, dealing in oil production, land and water management, real estate, and stock and bond investment. Operations on the Rancho San Pedro lands remained of paramount importance, and the Dominguez Estate Company managed leases to farmers, and also negotiated with officials, municipalities, and companies in matters regarding easements, rights of way, and land purchases.

Dominguez-Wilshire Company

The Dominguez Estate Company (along with the Dominguez Water Company) was initially headquartered in the Title Insurance Building in downtown Los Angeles. In 1929, the company purchased property at 5410 Wilshire Boulevard, in the booming Los Angeles business district known as the Miracle Mile. The Dominguez-Wilshire Company was incorporated that year to oversee construction of the Dominguez-Wilshire Building, and then to manage the building and rent office and retail space. The Dominguez Wilshire Company was dissolved in 1936, with the Dominguez Estate Company taking over the management of the building and tenancy. In 1944, the company was reincorporated as the Dominguez-Wilshire Corporation. It resumed management of the building, and stayed in existence until 1958, when it voluntarily dissolved, and its assets transferred to the Dominguez Estate Company.

Wilshire-New Hampshire Company

While the Dominguez-Wilshire Company was established to manage rentals at the Dominguez-Wilshire Building, the Wilshire-New Hampshire Company was incorporated in 1948 to develop and manage other properties, particularly an office building in the 600 block of New Hampshire Avenue in Los Angeles. The directors included Dominguez family members H. H. Cotton, H. H. Jarrett, and Edward A. Carson. The Wilshire-New Hampshire Company was in existence for three years; in 1951 it was voluntarily dissolved, and its assets absorbed into the Dominguez Estate Company.

Dominguez Water Corporation

When water engineer William Mulholland determined that there were extensive water reservoirs under Rancho lands, the Dominguez Water Company was established in 1911 as a means to distribute water to all parts of the Rancho. Headed by lawyer Henry O’Melveny, the company also supplied the water needs of the nearby town of Compton. While never profitable, the Dominguez Water Company remained in operation until 1936, when the Dominguez Estate Company bought it out, then reincorporated it in 1937 as the Dominguez Water Corporation. In 1940, the Dominguez Water Corporation became a public utility, eventually moved its headquarters to Long Beach, and began to greatly expand service.

Carson Estate Company

The Carson Estate Company was informally established in 1901 following the death of George Carson, then formally incorporated in 1914, with Victoria de Carson as President and her children as directors (along with son-in-law H. H. Cotton, who was elected secretary). The Company initially intended to raise money through the leasing and sale of land, but with the discovery of oil on Rancho property, the articles of incorporation were amended in 1924 to permit oil drilling on the Carson property. Farming, land management, and oil production would continue to be the primary concerns of the Carson Estate Company.

Francis Companies

The Francis Land Company was incorporated in 1928 to help manage the Rancho San Pedro holdings of Maria de los Reyes Dominguez de Francis. De Francis was widowed and had no children of her own, and she wished to distribute her wealth to members of the extended family without imposing heavy tax burdens. Her lawyer and confidant, Henry O’Melveny, organized the company to have close and complex ties with the other family-related companies, particularly the Dominguez Estate Company, the Carson Land Company, and the Watson Land Company. Following de Francis’s death, the assets of the Francis Land Company, largely held by the Carson Land and Watson Land companies, were transferred to the Dominguez Estate Company. The complexity of the issues surrounding both the de Francis Estate and the Francis Land Company made resolution problematic, and it would take years of legal maneuvering before both were settled. The Francis Land Company continued to exist as a subsidiary of the Dominguez Estate Company until 1944, when it was dissolved, though all assets were not liquidated until 1951.

Reyes-Dominguez Company

While the Francis Land Company accounted for the bulk of the de Francis estate, Mrs. de Francis retained ownership of nearly $3.5 million worth of municipal bonds. In 1932, O’Melveny incorporated another company, the Reyes-Dominguez Company, to manage these assets, largely through the purchase and sale of bonds and securities. In 1936, the Reyes-Dominguez Estate Company began the process of liquidating its assets; like the Francis Land Company, however, it was several years before all of these assets could be transferred to the Dominguez Estate Company.

Watson Land Company

The Watson Estate Company was incorporated in 1912 to help protect the interests of Dolores Simona Dominguez de Watson. While the Watson Estate Company made a steady, albeit relatively small, income from leasing land, it broke with other Rancho-based companies in regularly selling off small pieces of property. The company was reincorporated as the Watson Land Company in 1927, largely as a way to have lands assessed according to richer 1920s valuations, rather than the 1913 valuation that had been used. Under reincorporation, land sales and leases gave the Watson Land Company a sounder financial foundation. As with other Rancho-based concerns, the Watson Land Company realized profits from sales and leases to oil companies; throughout its history, though, the directors of the Watson Land Company focused on the agricultural and industrial development of the land. The success of this practice grew throughout the century, and the Watson Land Company remains one of the most successful in Southern California.

Jarret Estate Company/Ramona Properties

Following the death of Dolores Watson Jarrett, her husband H. H. Jarrett managed their sons’ estate until they reached legal adulthood. The estate held Dominguez and Watson stock, and in 1937 Jarrett created the Jarrett Estate Company as a way to invest the profits, primarily in real estate. In 1937, the name of the company was changed to Ramona Properties. In 1939-1940, Ramona Properties purchased lots from the Francis Land Company in what was to become Cheviot Knolls, one of the first major Los Angeles subdivisions.

Beverly-Arnaz Company

In 1939, H. H. Cotton and H. H. Jarrett headed a syndicate formed to purchase property known as the Arnaz Tract from the Marblehead Land Company, owned by Malibu heir and Los Angeles benefactress Rhoda Rindge Adamson. In April, 1939, the syndicate incorporated as the Beverly-Arnaz Land Company, with Cotton as President and Jarrett as Director. Also on the board was noted Los Angeles developer Walter H. Leimert. By 1940, the Arnaz Tract was being developed as Beverlywood, a subdivision located near Beverly Hills and what is now Century City in the Los Angeles area. The company was voluntarily dissolved in 1946 and its assets liquidated.

Valencia Spanish Tile Corporation

The Valencia Spanish Tile Corporation, a manufacturer of ceramic tiles, operated out of Culver City, located near Los Angeles. Several members of the Carson family owned stock in the corporation from the 1920s, and in 1937 Lucy Carson Rasmussen, David Carson, and H. H. Cotton gained control of the company as principal shareholders. They were only nominally directors, retaining former owner Charles Bausback as manager. While not actively seeking out new business, the corporation continued to serve a number of clients for several years.

From the guide to the Rancho San Pedro Collection, 1769-1972, 1900-1960, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

History

Originally encompassing over 75,000 acres the Rancho San Pedro was granted to Juan Jose Dominguez by the King of Spain in 1784. Juan Jose had served as a Spanish soldier in California and received the land following his retirement. Juan Jose built one of the first adobes in the region and lived there for varying periods until his death in 1809. The Rancho San Pedro was then willed to Jose Cristobal Dominguez (a nephew) who in turn willed it to his sons. One of the sons, Manuel, eventually took sole ownership of the property. Manuel built a new adobe structure where he lived with his wife (Maria Engracia) and their children. He was also very involved in local politics and served as mayor of Los Angeles on three separate occasions as well as becoming one of the first county supervisors and delegate to the first constitutional convention of California in 1849. When California became a state in 1849 Manuel was responsible for proving the legality of the original land grant thus ensuring his ownership. A United States land patent was granted to him for the Rancho lands in 1858. The area covered by the patent ran from Redondo Beach in the west, to Compton in the east and the harbor in the south. Manuel used the land to graze cattle and raise crops. His brand, a lemon shaped mark, became a highly recognizable symbol on the ears of his cattle. In 1882 Manuel Dominguez died and left his estate, including the remainder of the Rancho lands, to his six daughters.

Five of the daughters married, three to Anglos, and went on to create corporations which would administer their holding. These corporations, The Dominguez Estate Company, the Carson Estate Company, the Watson Estate Company, the Francis Estate Company and the Del Amo Estate Company oversaw the daughters’ interests in the land. By 1930, when oil was discovered on Rancho land, most of the agrarian activities associated with the Rancho had ceased. It is estimated that the 350 oil wells developed on the land produced over $1 million year of income for a period of over 20 years. Today only two of the original estate companies survive, the Carson Estate Company and The Watson Land Company, but much of the of the heritage of the original owners of the Rancho and their descendants can be found as both local street and city names in communities which were part of the original Spanish land grant.

The original adobe structure built by Juan Jose Dominguez was replaced by a more permanent structure built by Manuel Dominguez. This more modern adobe served as the main family residence for many years. In the 1920's the Del Amo family gave the property to the Claretian order and built a structure to be used as a seminary. The Adobe continued to be used as a residence of the Dominguez family until 1924. In 1945 the Adobe became an official California State Landmark (No. 152). In 1976, to commemorate its 150th anniversary, the adobe underwent a complete restoration and again was recognized by being placed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks. Today the Adobe is open to the public tours. The seminary building is now used by the Claretians as a retirement retreat.

From the guide to the Rancho San Pedro Reference Collection, 1905-2004, (California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf South Bay History Collection, 1923-2005 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Hata, Donald Teruo, 1934- . University Relations : the Japanese garden records, [1972-1985] California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf 1932 Olympics Exhibit Collection, 1932, 1984 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
creatorOf Olympic Velodrome Collection, 1979- Department of Archives and Special Collections. University Library. California State Library, Dominguez Hills.
referencedIn Ten Year History of California State University, Dominguez Hills, 1961-1986 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Cain, Leo F. CSUDH President's Office - Cain (Leo F.) Papers 1962-1976 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
referencedIn Del Amo Foundation. Del Amo Foundation Collection, 1927-1984. California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
referencedIn California State University Historical Archives Advisory Committee Papers, 1981-1997, 1981-1997 California State University Historical Archives California State University, Dominguez Hills
creatorOf California State University, Dominguez Hills. Olympic Velodrome Collection, 1979-1995 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf California State University Dominguez Hills. Academic And Facilities Master Planning/Early History Documents California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
referencedIn Heilbron (Louis H.) Papers, 1950-2006, (Bulk 1960-1985) California State University Historical Archives California State University, Dominguez Hills
referencedIn Krushkhov, Abraam. Krushkhov (Abraam) collection, 1933-1987 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf Rancho San Pedro Collection, 1769-1972, 1900-1960 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn California State University Master Plan Collection, 1959-2002 California State University Historical Archives California State University, Dominguez Hills
creatorOf Rancho San Pedro Reference Collection, 1905-2004 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Del Amo Foundation Collection, 1927-1984 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Heilbron, Louis Henry, 1907-2006. Louis H. Heilbron Papers, 1950-2006 : 1960-1985. California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf California State University, Dominguez Hills Video Collections, 1973-2006 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Gerth, Donald R. CSUDH President's Office : Gerth (Donald R.) Papers, 1976-1984 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf Compton History Collection, 1869-1998 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
creatorOf South Bay Photo Collection, circa 1880-1967 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Nethery, Harry A., 1918-1996. Ten Year History of California State University, Dominguez Hills, 1961-1986 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
referencedIn California State University Catalog Collection, 1933-1995 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Anderson, Glenn M., 1913-1994. The Glenn M. Anderson Papers, 1870s-2000, 1940-1994 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf 25th Anniversary, California State University Dominguez Hills, 1983-1986 Department of Archives and Special Collections. University Library. California State Library, Dominguez Hills.
creatorOf California State University, Dominguez Hills. 25th Anniversary, California State University Dominguez Hills California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf California State University, Dominguez Hills. CSUDH President's Office - Detweiler (Robert C.) Papers California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
referencedIn Butwell, Richard 1929-1987. CSUDH President's Office - Record Group: 20, Subgroup 3: Richard Butwell California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
referencedIn Brownell, John. CSUDH President's Office - Brownell (John) Papers, 1987-1989 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf California State University Dominguez Hills Master Planning / Site Selection Collection, 1958-1984 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Glenn M. Anderson Papers, 1870s-2000, 1940-1994 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
referencedIn Gerth (Donald R.) Papers, 1946-2010 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
creatorOf California State University, Dominguez Hills. Campus Site Selection Documents, 1960-1968 California State University, Dominguez Hills, CSUDH
creatorOf Political Newspapers Collection, 1953-1994, bulk 1969-1992 California State University, Dominguez Hills Archives and Special Collections
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith American Society of University Composers corporateBody
associatedWith Anderson, Glenn M. person
associatedWith Anderson, Glenn M., 1913-1994 person
associatedWith Associated Oil Company corporateBody
associatedWith Bailosky, Marshall person
associatedWith Bernard, Frank. person
associatedWith Beverly-Arnaz Land Company corporateBody
associatedWith Black Panther Party corporateBody
associatedWith Brown, Edmund G. (Edmund Gerald), 1905-1996 person
associatedWith Brownell, John person
associatedWith Butwell, Richard 1929-1987 person
associatedWith Cain, Leo F. person
associatedWith Cain, Leo F. person
associatedWith California. Governor (1959-1967 : Brown) corporateBody
associatedWith California State College at Palos Verdes corporateBody
associatedWith California State College, Dominguez Hills corporateBody
associatedWith California State Department of Education. Master Plan Survey Team. corporateBody
associatedWith California State University corporateBody
associatedWith California State University and Colleges corporateBody
associatedWith California State University and Colleges. Board of Trustees corporateBody
associatedWith California State University and Colleges. Office of the Chancellor corporateBody
associatedWith California State University. Board of Trustees corporateBody
associatedWith California State University. Chancellor's Office. corporateBody
associatedWith California State University, Dominguez Hills. University Art Gallery corporateBody
associatedWith California State University Historical Archives Advisory Committee corporateBody
associatedWith California State University Office of the Chancellor corporateBody
associatedWith Carson Estate Company corporateBody
associatedWith Carson, George Henry person
associatedWith Carson, John Victor person
associatedWith Carson, Maria Victoria Dominguez person
associatedWith Carter, Jimmy, 1924- person
associatedWith Chanslor-Western Oil & Development Company corporateBody
associatedWith Cleaver, Eldridge, 1935-1998 person
associatedWith Cohn, Kaspare person
associatedWith Communist Party of the United States of America corporateBody
associatedWith Cotton, Hamilton H. person
associatedWith Davis, Angela Y. (Angela Yvonne), 1944- person
associatedWith Del Amo Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Del Amo, Gregorio person
associatedWith Del Amo, Susana Delfina Dominguez person
associatedWith Detweiler, Robert (Robert C.) person
associatedWith Dominguez Estate Company corporateBody
associatedWith Dominguez, Guadalupe Marcelina person
associatedWith Dominguez, Manuel person
associatedWith Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum corporateBody
associatedWith Dominguez Water Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Dominguez-Wilshire Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Dumke, Glenn S. person
associatedWith Falkenstein, Claire person
associatedWith Francis Land Company corporateBody
associatedWith Francis, Maria Jesus de los Reyes Dominguez de person
associatedWith Gerth, Donald R. person
associatedWith Guyer, Ana Josefa Dominguez de person
associatedWith Hata, Donald Teruo, 1934- . person
associatedWith Heilbron, Louis, 1907-2006 person
associatedWith Heilbron, Louis Henry, 1907-2006. person
associatedWith Jackson, Jesse, 1941- person
associatedWith Jarrett Estate Company corporateBody
associatedWith Jones, A. Quincy (Archie Quincy), 1913-1979 person
associatedWith Kaspare Cohn Commercial & Savings Bank corporateBody
associatedWith Krushkhov, Abraam person
associatedWith Loker, David person
associatedWith Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee corporateBody
associatedWith Mao, Zedong, 1893-1976 person
associatedWith Marland Oil Company corporateBody
associatedWith McDonald, Juanita Millender person
associatedWith Mori, Allen A. person
associatedWith Munitz, Barry person
associatedWith Nethery, Harry A., 1918-1996 person
associatedWith Newton, Huey P. person
associatedWith NUCEA (National University Continuing Education Association) corporateBody
associatedWith O’Melveny, Henry John person
associatedWith O’Melveny & Myers corporateBody
associatedWith Poulson, Norris, 1895-1982 person
associatedWith Ramona Properties corporateBody
associatedWith Reagan, Ronald person
associatedWith Reyes-Dominguez Company corporateBody
associatedWith Richfield Oil Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Seale, Bobby, 1936- person
associatedWith Shell Oil Company corporateBody
associatedWith Southland Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Standard Oil Company of California corporateBody
associatedWith Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Union Bank & Trust Company of Los Angeles corporateBody
associatedWith Union Oil Company of California corporateBody
associatedWith Valencia Spanish Tile Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Victory Oil Company corporateBody
associatedWith Walter H. Leimert Co. corporateBody
associatedWith Watson Land Company corporateBody
associatedWith Watson, Maria Dolores Dominguez de person
associatedWith Weather Underground Organization corporateBody
associatedWith Wilshire-New Hampshire Corporation corporateBody
associatedWith Zweig, Martha person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Long Beach (Calif.)
Lakewood (Calif.)
Hawthorne (Calif.)
Rolling Hills (Calif.)
Carson (Calif.)
Wilmington (Calif.)
Manhattan Beach (Calif.)
Terminal Island (Calif.)
Torrance (Calif.)
Fort MacArthur (Calif.)
Los Angeles (Calif.)
Terminal Island (Calif.)
Fort MacArthur (Calif.)
Long Beach Harbor (Calif.)
Dominguez Hills (Calif.)
Los Angeles (Calif.)
Compton (Calif.)
Wilshire Boulevard (Los Angeles, Calif.)
Long Beach (Calif.)
Lynwood (Calif.)
Palos Verdes Peninsula (Calif.)
Palos Verdes (Calif.)
Redondo Beach (Calif.)
Palos Verdes Estates (Calif.)
Rancho San Pedro (Calif.)
Compton (Calif.)
Gardena (Calif.)
Lawndale (Calif.)
Carson (Calif.)
Dominguez Hills (Calif.)
Carson (Calif.)
Lomita (Calif.)
Torrance (Calif.)
Lakewood (Calif.)
Long Beach (Calif.)
Playa del Rey (Calif.)
Compton (Calif.)
Carson (Calif.)
Palos Verdes Peninsula (Calif.)
Los Angeles (Calif.)
Lynwood (Calif.)
Torrance (Calif.)
Torrance (Calif.)
Rancho Palos Verdes (Calif.)
California
Lynwood (Calif.)
Dominguez Hills (Calif.)
San Pedro (Calif.)
Rolling Hills (Calif.)
Redondo Beach (Calif.)
Davidson City (Calif.)
Wilmington (Calif.)
Los Angeles (Calif.)
Rancho San Pedro (Calif.)
Torrance (Calif.)
Dominguez Hills (Calif.)
San Pedro (Los Angeles, Calif.)
Lynwood (Calif.)
Rancho San Pedro (Calif.)
Subject
Family-owned business enterprises
Corporate governance
Partition of decedents' estates
Planned communities--California
Petroleum industry and trade--California
Campus planning--California
Communism--United States--Newspapers
Anniversaries
Water resources development--California--Los Angeles County
Liberal perspectives
Inheritance and transfer tax--Law and legislation
Labor unions--United States--Newspapers
Alien labor
Agriculture--Farm Produce
Philosophy, Marxist--United States--Newspapers
California State University--Administration
Public transit
Real property--Valuation
African American legislatures
Immigration
Education, Higher--California
World War, 1939-1945--Law and legislation
Housing development--California
Japanese American evacuation and resettlement
Annexation (municipal government)
Public schools--California--Compton
African--American studies
Higher education and state--California
Central business districts--California--Los Angeles
Stock transfer--Law and legislation
Underground newspapers--United States
Aeronautics--Competitions
Peace movements--United States--Newspapers
Olympic Games (10th : 1932 : Los Angeles, Calif.)
Conspiracy theories--United States--Newspapers
Public utilities--California--Los Angeles
Carson (Calif.)--History
Methodist Church--California--Los Angeles
College facilities--Planning--California--Dominguez Hills
California State University and Colleges. Board of Trustees
Facility Design and Construction
Guided light transit
Olympics
Student movements--California--Berkeley--Newspapers
Planning
Chicano movement--United States--Newspapers
Water utilities--California--Los Angeles
Real estate business--California--Los Angeles County
Earthquakes--California--Long Beach
Agriculture--Harvesting
Student movements--United States--Newspapers
College buildings--California
California State University, Dominguez Hills--Buildings
Marxist criticism--United States--Newspapers
Earthquake damage
alifornia State University and Colleges--History
9/11 Public Discourse Project
Real estate development--California--Los Angeles
Water-supply--California
Public schools--California--Employees
Marxist--Leninist theory
Labor movement--United States--Newspapers
California. Legislature
Velodromes
California State University, Dominguez Hills. University Art Gallery--Exhibitions
Marxist pamphlets
Public buildings
Public buildings--California--Compton
Olympic Games (10th : 1932 : Los Angeles, Calif.) Maps
Feminist theory--United States--Newspapers
Olympic Games (23rd : 1984 : Los Angeles, Calif.)
Magnet schools
Japanese American farmers--Los Angeles
Farms--California
Public universities and colleges--California
Underground press publications--United States
Oil and gas leases--California
Methodist church buildings
Oil wells--California--Los Angeles
Land grants--California
California State University, Dominguez Hills--History
State universities and colleges--California--History
Occupation
Activity
Collectors

Corporate Body

Active 1979

Active 1995

Information

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