Communications Workers of America

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The National Typographical Union was organized in 1852 and in 1869 changed its name to the International Typographical Union (ITU). In 1987, the ITU merged into the Communication Workers of America (CWA). The Women's International Auxiliary, a division of the ITU, disbanded in 1990.

From the description of Women's International Auxiliary records, [ca. 1940-1990]. (Georgia State University). WorldCat record id: 38477528

The Communications Workers of America (CWA) which was founded in 1947 as an industrial union of telephone industry workers is now one of the largest unions in the United States with an active public employees department.

From the description of Communications Workers of America records, 1919-1989 (bulk 1947-1989). (New York University). WorldCat record id: 476031092

The Communications Workers of America (CWA) which was founded in 1947 as an industrial union of telephone industry workers expanded in the latter decades of the twentieth century to include a variety of categories of workers, among them television and radio technicians, journalists, healthcare workers, and a large and growing division of public employees. The union frequently commissioned or otherwise acquired audio recordings of major union events, speeches by union officers and others, broadcasts, and publicity and educational materials.

From the description of Audiotape collection, 1952-1987. (New York University). WorldCat record id: 476129753

The organization of the Communications Workers of America (CWA) in 1947 was the culmination of nearly a half-century of struggle for telephone unionism. Until the middle 1890s there was very little union activity among telephone workers. In 1898 the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) began to try to organize some of the telephone linemen and cable splicers. Numerous strikes by the IBEW in the 1910s were unsuccessful as the Bell Telephone Company used its monopolistic control over the industry to defeat telephone unionism. However, during these years there was an upsurge of union membership among telephone operators mostly centered in Boston. A joint organizing campaign by the IBEW and Women's Trade Union League was very successful and won major concessions in 1914-1915. However, after a failed strike in 1919, the Bell Company began to aggressively promote company unions and aggressively fought all organizing drives. Telephone unions found that it was very difficult to organize an industry in which the Bell Company had monopolistic control and almost unlimited resources. The company took advantage of the fact that telephone workers were geographically dispersed and the conversion to dial telephones made the system less vulnerable to labor slowdowns. Bell's hiring practices assured that the vast majority of telephone workers were relatively highly educated, native-born Caucasians who were well spoken in English. Telephone operators were predominately young women who tended to work for only a few years before marrying and having families. These workforce demographics made union organizing difficult. The passage of the Wagner Act in 1936, which removed all the legal barriers to industrial union organization, reinvigorated the campaign for telephone unionism. However, progress was slow as telephone workers were for the most part insulated from the worst effects of the Great Depression. The Bell Company's response to the Wagner Act that outlawed company unions was to transform them into so-called independent labor organizations (non AFL or CIO) that could claim to be in compliance with national labor laws. During the early CIO years from 1937 through 1942 union organizing proceeded slowly in the telephone industry. The focus was on amalgamating the various local unions that were plant, craft, or district based into a national federation. In 1939 the National Federation of Telephone Workers (NFTW) was formed but this organization was weak and decentralized. Stagnant wages and deteriorating working conditions during World War II stimulated telephone worker solidarity and union amalgamation. When Joseph A. Beirne was elected President of NFTW in 1943 the union began a full-scale organizing campaign. In 1946 there was a nation wide strike that led to the first national agreement with the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT & T). However, recognizing the weakness of the NFTW structure AT & T forced another strike in 1947. When this strike collapsed the NFTW structure fell apart and the CWA was born. During the next twenty-five years the CWA under the leadership of Joseph A. Beirne moved aggressively to organize all the telephone workers in the United States. AT & T with its monopolistic control resisted. It was, however, not until 1974 after years of labor-management unrest and a series of strikes that AT&T agreed to system wide collective bargaining. Shortly after the national contract was signed Joseph A. Beirne died and was replaced as President by Secretary-Treasurer Glenn E. Watts. In the 1980s the CWA began to expand beyond telecommunications creating a Public Employees Department that successfully organized 34,000 New Jersey state workers in 1981. In 1985 Morton Bahr became the CWA President. In 1987 the CWA merged with the International Typographical Workers Union. In 1992 it absorbed the National Association of Broadcast Employees and the Newspaper Guild merged with the CWA. Today the CWA is one of the United States' strongest unions with more than 600,000 members.

From the description of Communications Workers of America records. Addendum, 1939-1998 (bulk 1970-1995). (New York University). WorldCat record id: 478340991

The Communications Workers of America (CWA), founded in 1947 as an industrial union of telephone industry workers, is now one of the largest unions in the United States with a diverse membership, including an active public employees division. The union produced film and video footage for its own use, and also acquired footage of broacasts relaing to the union and produced films used by the union for educational purposes.

From the description of Communications Workers of America film collection, 1950s-1990s. (New York University). WorldCat record id: 474983118

The Communications Workers of America (CWA), founded in 1947 as an industrial union of telephone industry workers, was the culmination of nearly a half-century of struggle for telephone unionism. Its first president was Joseph A. Beirne, who had led its predecessor union, the National Federation of Telephone Workers (NFTW), in an organizing campaign and a nation-wide strike in 1946 that resulted in the first national agreement with the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T).

During the next twenty-five years under the leadership Beirne, the CWA moved aggressively to organize all the telephone workers in the United States. It was not until 1974, however, after years of labor-management unrest and a series of strikes, that AT&T agreed to system-wide collective bargaining. Shortly after the national contract was signed, Joseph Beirne died and was replaced as President by Secretary-Treasurer Glenn E. Watts. In the 1960s, the CWA became an active participant in international labor activities supporting the United States government’s Cold War policies through the union’s involvement in organizations such as the CIA- and USAID (United States Agency for International Development)- financed American Institute for Free Labor Development (AIFLD).

In the 1980s the CWA began to expand beyond telecommunications, creating a Public Employees Department that successfully organized 34,000 New Jersey state workers in 1981. In 1985 Morton Bahr became the CWA President. In 1987 the CWA merged with the International Typographical Workers Union. In 1992 it absorbed the National Association of Broadcast Employees and the Newspaper Guild merged with the CWA. By the 2000s the CWA had become one of the United States' largest and strongest unions with more than 600,000 members.

From the guide to the Communications Workers of America Photographs: Part I, Photographic Prints., Bulk, 1960-1988, 1915-1988, (Bulk 1960s-1980s), (Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive)

The organization of the Communications Workers of America (CWA) in 1947 was the culmination of nearly a half-century of struggle for telephone unionism. Until the middle 1890s there was very little union activity among telephone workers. In 1898 the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) began to try to organize some of the telephone linemen and cable splicers. Numerous strikes by the IBEW in the 1910s were unsuccessful as the Bell Telephone Company used its monopolistic control over the industry to defeat telephone unionism. However, during these years there was an upsurge of union membership among telephone operators mostly centered in Boston. A joint organizing campaign by the IBEW and Women's Trade Union League was very successful and won major concessions in 1914-1915. However, after a failed strike in 1919, the Bell Company began to aggressively promote company unions and aggressively fought all organizing drives.

Telephone unions found that it was very difficult to organize an industry in which the Bell Company had monopolistic control and almost unlimited resources. The company took advantage of the fact that telephone workers were geographically dispersed and the conversion to dial telephones made the system less vulnerable to labor slowdowns. Bell's hiring practices assured that the vast majority of telephone workers were relatively highly educated, native born Caucasians who were well spoken in English. Telephone operators were predominately young women who tended to work for only a few years before marrying and having families. These workforce demographics made union organizing difficult.

The passage of the Wagner Act in 1936, which removed all the legal barriers to industrial union organization, reinvigorated the campaign for telephone unionism. However, progress was slow as telephone workers were for the most part insulated from the worst effects of the Great Depression. The Bell Company's response to the Wagner Act that outlawed company unions was to transform them into so-called independent labor organizations (non AFL or CIO) that could claim to be in compliance with national labor laws. During the early CIO years from 1937 through 1942 union organizing proceeded slowly in the telephone industry. The focus was on amalgamating the various local unions that were plant, craft, or district based into a national federation.

In 1939 the National Federation of Telephone Workers (NFTW) was formed but this organization was weak and decentralized. Stagnant wages and deteriorating working conditions during World War II stimulated telephone worker solidarity and union amalgamation. When Joseph A. Beirne was elected President of NFTW in 1943 the union began a full-scale organizing campaign. In 1946 there was a nation wide strike that led to the first national agreement with the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT & T). However, recognizing the weakness of the NFTW structure AT & T forced another strike in 1947. When this strike collapsed the NFTW structure fell apart and the CWA was born.

During the next twenty-five years the CWA under the leadership of Joseph A. Beirne moved aggressively to organize all the telephone workers in the United States. AT & T with its monopolistic control resisted. It was, however, not until 1974 after years of labor-management unrest and a series of strikes that AT&T agreed to system wide collective bargaining. Shortly after the national contract was signed Joseph A. Beirne died and was replaced as President by Secretary-Treasurer Glenn E. Watts.

In the 1980s the CWA began to expand beyond telecommunications creating a Public Employees Department that successfully organized 34,000 New Jersey state workers in 1981. In 1985 Morton Bahr became the CWA President. In 1987 the CWA merged with the International Typographical Workers Union. In 1992 it absorbed the National Association of Broadcast Employees and the Newspaper Guild merged with the CWA. Today the CWA is one of the United States' strongest unions with more than 600,000 members.

From the guide to the Communications Workers of America Records, Bulk, 1947-1989, 1911-1994, (Bulk 1947-1989), (Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn Left Labor Caucuses Collection, 1966-1995 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Conroy, Catherine,. Oral history interview with Catherine Conroy, 1976. Wayne State University, Archives of Labor & Urban Affairs
creatorOf Porter, Gene, 1943-. Oral history interview with Gene Porter in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1991 Aug. 12 [microform] / conducted by Dan Holub. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Empire Typographical and Mailer Conference. Empire Typographical and Mailer Conference records, 1919-1990 [microform] University at Albany, University Libraries
referencedIn Communications Workers of America, Local 1153 Records, Bulk, 1976-1987, 1944-1999 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Jones, A. Thomas. A. Thomas Jones papers, 1959. Wisconsin Historical Society Archives
referencedIn Blanche Wells Papers AR59., 1944-1973, 1947-1966 Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Library
referencedIn Berthelot, Helen W. Helen W. Berthelot papers, 1950-1976. University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library
creatorOf Staley, Robert W. Papers, 1944-1975. University of Texas at Arlington, Central Library
referencedIn Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.). Publicity Dept. North Carolina. Papers, 1946-1953. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
referencedIn C.I.O. Organizing Committee. South Carolina. Papers, 1946-1953. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
referencedIn Albany Typographical Union No. 4 (Albany, N.Y.). Albany Typographical Union No. 4 records [microform], 1850-1988. University at Albany, University Libraries
referencedIn Communications Workers of America, District 1 Records, Bulk, 1968-1982, 1946-1989, (Bulk 1968-1982) Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
referencedIn AFL-CIO. Internal Disputes Plan. Decisions of the Impartial Umpire, 1964-1976. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University.
referencedIn Berthelot, Helen W. Helen W. Berthelot papers, 1948-1995. University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library
referencedIn Larkin, Dale,. Dale K. Larkin collection, 1959-1985 (bulk 1975-1985). East Tennessee State University, TET
referencedIn Tamiment Library Newspapers, Bulk, 1960-1990, 1873-, (Bulk 1960-1990) Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Communications Workers of America records 1995 - 1996 Olson Library, Northern Michigan University, Lydia M. Olson Library
referencedIn Communications Workers of America District 1 New England Area. Communications Workers of America, District 1, New England Area Records 1960s-2000s (bulk, 1980s-2000s). New York University, Tamiment Library
referencedIn Guide to the Sol Stetin Papers, 1935-1992, bulk 1972-1989 Rutgers University Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives.
creatorOf Frett, Raymond, 1926-. Oral history interview with Raymond Frett in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1982 Aug. 30 [microform] / conducted by Merle O. Davis. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Communications Workers of America, Local 1153 Records, Bulk, 1976-1987, 1944-1998, (Bulk 1976-1987) Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
creatorOf Soesbe, Robert, 1926-. Oral history interview with Robert Soesbe in Clinton, Iowa, 1991 June 07 [microform] / conducted by Dan Holub. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Wells, Blanche. Papers, 1944-1973, (bulk 1947-1966). University of Texas at Arlington, Central Library
referencedIn Archives Union File, 1892-2004. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn New England Telephone Workers Strike Bulletins Records MS 323., 1989 Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries
referencedIn New England Telephone workers strike bulletins, 1989. University of Massachusetts Amherst, W.E.B. Du Bois Library
creatorOf Tolson, Jaquelyn R., 1950-. Oral history interview with Jaquelyn R. Tolson and Nancy Dehm in Burlington, Iowa, 1990 May 21 [microform] / conducted by Merle O. Davis. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Communications Workers of America Printed Ephemera Collection, 1941-2008 Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
creatorOf Communications Workers of America Photographs: Part I, Photographic Prints., Bulk, 1960-1988, 1915-1988, (Bulk 1960s-1980s) Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
creatorOf Donahue, Catherine, 1925-. Oral history interview with Catherine Donahue in Clinton, Iowa, 1982 June 25 [microform] / conducted by Merle O. Davis. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Independent Association of Publishers' Employees Records, Bulk, 1985-1995, 1937-2003 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Papers, 1905-2001. University of Oklahoma, Bizzell Memorial Library
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Communications Workers of America film collection, 1950s-1990s. Churchill County Museum
referencedIn United States. Dept. of Labor. United States. Dept. of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Collective Bargaining Agreements, 1942-1980. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Communications Workers of America Records, Local 6201, Fort Worth, Texas AR424., 1939-1996, 1951-1990 Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Library
referencedIn Wiencek, Ruth,. Oral history interview with Ruth Wiencek, 1976. Wayne State University, Archives of Labor & Urban Affairs
referencedIn Conroy, Catherine, 1919-1988. Papers, 1947-1990. Wisconsin Historical Society, Newspaper Project
referencedIn Communications Workers of America, Local 1172 Records, Bulk, 1960-1993, 1953-1993, (Bulk 1960-1993) Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
referencedIn Communications Workers of America Printed Ephemera Collection, 1941-2008 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Hilpert, Elmer E., 1905-1975. Elmer E. Hilpert series 1. General arbitration files, part b, 1948-1975. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Helen W. Berthelot papers, 1948-1996 Bentley Historical Library , University of Michigan
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Communications Workers of America records. Addendum, 1939-1998 (bulk 1970-1995). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Adair, Goldthwaite, Stanford and Daniel. Arbitration records, 1955-1956. Georgia State University
referencedIn Drob, Judah. Judah Drob papers, 1936-1975, (bulk 1943-1975). Wayne State University, Archives of Labor & Urban Affairs
referencedIn National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians (NABET) Records, Bulk, 1970-1990, 1958-1995 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Communications Workers of America, District 1, New England Area Records, 1960s-2000s (bulk, 1980s-2000s) Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
referencedIn Karl, Frank. Frank Karl papers, 1940-1990 (bulk [1980-1990]). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Zack, Arnold. Zack, Arnold. Additional Arbitration files, 1996. Cornell University Library
referencedIn AFL-CIO Internal Disputes Plan Decisions of the Impartial Umpire, 1964-1976. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Communications Workers of America. East Tennessee Office. Communication Workers of America records, 1959-1979. East Tennessee State University, TET
referencedIn Communications Workers of America. Local 1151. Records of the Communications Workers of America, Local 1151, 1946-2001 (bulk 1960s-1980s). Churchill County Museum
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Women's International Auxiliary records, [ca. 1940-1990]. Georgia State University
referencedIn Button Collection of Tamiment Library-Wagner Labor Archives, [ca. 1900-1990]. 1930-1970 (bulk). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Summers, Clyde W. Summers, Clyde. Office files, 1940-2004. Cornell University Library
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. [Agreements, etc.] Wisconsin Historical Society
referencedIn Cole, David Lawrence, 1902-1977. David Lawrence Cole series 7. Speeches, writings and lecture materials, 1949-1972, bulk 1949-1969. Cornell University Library
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Local 7181 (Burlington, Iowa). Communications Workers of America Local 7181 records, 1977-1989. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Communications Workers of America. Local 2150. Communications Workers of America, Local 2150, records 1946-2002 (bulk 1970s-1990s). Churchill County Museum
creatorOf Communications Workers of America Records, Bulk, 1947-1989, 1911-1994, (Bulk 1947-1989) Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
creatorOf New Jersey Bell Telephone Company. New Jersey Traffic Division No. 55. Records, 1950. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University.
referencedIn Feinberg, I. Robert (Irving Robert), 1912-1975. Series 1.General arbitration case files, part b, 1946-1975. Cornell University Library
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Photograph collection, 1938-1966. University of Texas at Arlington, Central Library
referencedIn Young, Holgate. Papers, 1949-1975. Wayne State University
referencedIn Frank Karl Papers, Bulk, 1980-1990, 1940-1990, (Bulk 1980-1990) Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
referencedIn National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians. Records, 1959-1995, (bulk 1970-1990). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Communications Workers of America, Local 1180 Records, 1956-1986 Tamiment Library / Wagner Archives
referencedIn Sheinman, Martin, Collector. Collective Bargaining Agreements. 1943-2008. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Greenberg, Elinor. Elinor Miller Greenberg papers, 1970-2008 [manuscript]. Regis University
referencedIn Steve Early Communications Workers of America Papers, 1987-2007 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Communications Workers of America. District 1. Records, 1946-1989, (bulk 1968-1982). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Wooding, Nelle,. Oral history interview with Nelle Wooding, 1978. Wayne State University, Archives of Labor & Urban Affairs
referencedIn Fulton County Typographical Union 268 (N.Y). Fulton County Typographical Union, No. 268 records, 1894-1973. University at Albany, University Libraries
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Communications Workers of America records, 1919-1989 (bulk 1947-1989). Churchill County Museum
referencedIn Robert N. Giaimo Papers., undated, 1956-1981. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Center.
referencedIn Wolf, Benjamin H., b. 1909. Benjamin H. Wolf series 1, subseries 2. Employers N-P, 1952-1975. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Alexander, Gabriel N., 1910-. Arbitration papers, 1929-1976, bulk 1940-1960. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Independent Association of Publishers Employees. Records of the Independent Association of Publishers' Employees, 1937-2003 (bulk 1985-1995). Churchill County Museum
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Audiotape collection, 1952-1987. Churchill County Museum
creatorOf Communications Workers of America. Local 7102 (Des Moines, Iowa). Communications Workers of America Local 7102 records, 1955-1984. Iowa State Historical Society
referencedIn Beirne, Joseph A., 1911-. Reminiscences of Joseph Anthony Beirne : oral history, 1957. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
referencedIn Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.). North Carolina Political Action Committee. Papers, 1944-1954. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Knight, Esther,. Oral history interview with Esther Knight in Des Moines, Iowa, 1980 April 10 [microform] / conducted by Gregory R. Zieren. Iowa State Historical Society
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Adair, Goldthwaite, Stanford and Daniel. corporateBody
associatedWith AFL-CIO. corporateBody
associatedWith AFL-CIO. person
associatedWith Albany Typographical Union No. 4 (Albany, N.Y.) corporateBody
associatedWith Alexander, Gabriel N., 1910- person
associatedWith American Institute for Free Labor Development. corporateBody
associatedWith American Telephone and Telegraph Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Ameritech. corporateBody
associatedWith Association of Communications Equipment Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith AT & T. corporateBody
associatedWith AT & T. corporateBody
associatedWith Bahr, Morton. person
associatedWith Beirne, Joseph A., 1911- person
associatedWith Bell Telephone Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Berthelot, Helen W. person
associatedWith Carroll, John Charles, 1885-1939. person
associatedWith Carter, Jimmy, 1924- person
associatedWith C.I.O. Organizing Committee. South Carolina. corporateBody
associatedWith Cole, David Lawrence, 1902-1977. person
associatedWith Commercial Telephone Workers Union. corporateBody
associatedWith Commercial Telephone Workers Union (Illinois). corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. District 1. corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America District 1 New England Area. corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. East Tennessee Office. corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 1151. corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 1153 (Valhalla, N.Y.). corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 1172. corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 1180 (New York, N.Y.). corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 2150. corporateBody
correspondedWith Communications Workers of America, Local 6201, Fort Worth, Texas. corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 7102 (Des Moines, Iowa) corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. Local 7181 (Burlington, Iowa) corporateBody
associatedWith Communications Workers of America. New Jersey Traffic. Division 55. corporateBody
associatedWith Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.). North Carolina Political Action Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Congress of Industrial Organizations (U.S.). Publicity Dept. North Carolina. corporateBody
associatedWith Conroy, Catherine, person
associatedWith Conroy, Catherine, 1919-1988. person
associatedWith Donahue, Catherine, 1925- person
associatedWith Drob, Judah. person
associatedWith Early, Steve person
associatedWith Empire Typographical and Mailer Conference. corporateBody
associatedWith Feinberg, I. Robert (Irving Robert), 1912-1975. person
associatedWith Frett, Raymond, 1926- person
associatedWith Fulton County Typographical Union 268 (N.Y) corporateBody
associatedWith Gerber, Lou. person
associatedWith Giaimo, Robert N. person
associatedWith Goldberg, Arthur J. person
associatedWith Greenberg, Elinor. person
associatedWith Hackney, Ray. person
associatedWith Hiawatha Telephone Company corporateBody
associatedWith Hilpert, Elmer E., 1905-1975. person
associatedWith Humphrey, Hubert H. 1911-1978. person
associatedWith Independent Association of Publishers Employees. corporateBody
associatedWith International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. corporateBody
associatedWith International Typographical Union. corporateBody
associatedWith International Typographical Union. Women's International Auxiliary. corporateBody
associatedWith Jobs with Justice (Organization : U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Johnson, Lyndon B. 1908-1973. person
associatedWith Jones, A. Thomas. person
associatedWith Joseph A. Beirne Memorial Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Joseph A. Beirne Memorial Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Karl, Frank. person
associatedWith Karl, Frank. person
associatedWith Kennedy, John F. 1917-1963. person
associatedWith Knecht, Louis person
associatedWith Knight, Esther, person
associatedWith Larkin, Dale, person
associatedWith Mancino, Larry. person
associatedWith McGovern, George S. 1922- person
associatedWith Meany, George, 1894-1980. person
associatedWith Mondale, Walter F., 1928- person
associatedWith Morgan, John T. person
associatedWith Morgan, John T. 1959- person
associatedWith National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians. corporateBody
associatedWith National Federation of Telephone Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith New England Telephone Workers corporateBody
associatedWith New Jersey Bell Telephone Company corporateBody
associatedWith Porter, Gene, 1943- person
associatedWith Postal, Telegraph and Telephone Workers' International. corporateBody
associatedWith Prometheus Research Library. corporateBody
associatedWith Schacht, John N., 1943- person
associatedWith Smallwood, William. person
associatedWith Soesbe, Robert, 1926- person
associatedWith Southern Federation of Telephone Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith Southern Federation of Telephone Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith Staley, Robert W. person
associatedWith Stetin, Sol person
associatedWith Summers, Clyde W. person
associatedWith Tamiment Library. corporateBody
associatedWith Telephone Guild Workers. corporateBody
associatedWith Tolson, Jaquelyn R., 1950- person
associatedWith United States. Agency for International Development. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Central Intelligence Agency. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Dept. of Labor. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. National Labor Relations Board. corporateBody
associatedWith United Telephone Employees. corporateBody
associatedWith University of Texas at Arlington corporateBody
associatedWith Watts, Glenn E. person
associatedWith Webb, Eddie person
correspondedWith Wells, Blanche. person
correspondedWith Wells, Blanche. person
associatedWith Werkau, Carlton W. person
associatedWith Western Electric Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Wiencek, Ruth, person
associatedWith Wolf, Benjamin H., b. 1909. person
associatedWith Wooding, Nelle, person
associatedWith Young, Holgate. person
associatedWith Zack, Arnold. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
United States
Michigan--Upper Peninsula
United States
United States
Texas
Latin America
United States
United States
Subject
Company unions
Labor unions--Organizing--United States
Discrimination in employment
Telecommunication--Law and legislation
Labor unions and international relations--United States--History--20th century
Telecommunication--Employees--Labor unions
Labor unions--Organizing
Telecommunication--Labor unions
Labor unions--Political activity--United States
Labor unions--Elections
Labor unions--Officials and employees
Telecommunication--Law and legislation--United States
Labor unions--Contract administration
Labor unions
Telecommunication--United States--History
Telephone operators
Telecommunication--History
Telephone companies--Employees--Pictorial works
Women employees--Telecommunication
Collective labor agreements--Telecommunication
Corporate divestiture
Telecommunication--Employees--United States
Labor unions and international relations--History--20th century
Civil rights
Arbitration, Industrial
Printing industry--Employees--Labor unions
Telecommunication
American Telephone and Telegraph Company--Employees
Corporate divestiture--United States
Telecommunication--Employees
Telephone companies--Employees--Labor unions--New Jersey
Company unions--Telecommunication
Government employee unions
Labor unions--Political activity
American Telephone and Telegraph Company--Reorganization
Collective bargaining
Telephone companies--Employees--Labor unions--Pictorial works
Labor unions and international relations
Women--Societies and clubs
Affirmative action programs
Women employees--Telecommunication--United States
Telephone companies--Employees--New Jersey
Labor unions--Latin America
Labor unions--Elections--United States
Telephone companies--New Jersey--Management
Labor unions--Telecommunication--United States
Strikes and lockouts--Telecommunication
Affirmative action programs--United States
Occupation
Function

Corporate Body

Active 1940

Active 1990

Information

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