Dobbs, B. B. (Beverly Bennett)

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B. B. Dobbs (1868-1937) was active as a photographer and also was a pioneer in the emerging motion picture business in both Alaska and Washington State during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; he is believed to be one of the first individuals to have used motion picture film north of the Arctic Circle.

Born Beverly Bennett Dobbs near Marshall, Missouri, he first learned photography in Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1888, Dobbs moved to Bellingham, Washington, where he would operate a photography studio for twelve years (including a partnership with F.F. Fleming under the name Dobbs & Fleming between 1890-1891). Lured by the gold rush, Dobbs moved to Nome, Alaska in 1900, but ultimately found more success documenting life in Alaska as a photographer and filmmaker. By 1903, he had formed a partnership with A.B. Kinne. The Dobbs & Kinne studio in Nome offered photography services and photo supplies. Dobbs photographed scenes in Nome and the Seward Peninsula and made award-winning portraits of the Inuit people (more commonly referred to at the time as Eskimos). Around 1909, he established the Dobbs Alaska Moving Picture Company, producing Atop of the World in Motion, a collection of travelogues. Just a few years later, Dobbs began to focus exclusively on filmmaking. He sold his photography negatives to the Lomen Brothers (who later issued some of his work under their company name). By 1914, he had set up the Dobbs Totem Film Company in Seattle, Washington. Dobbs is listed as the cinematographer for A Romance of Seattle, a film shot in and around Seattle in 1919. During the 1930s, Dobbs photographed fish processing operations at Pacific American Fisheries (PAF) in the Fairhaven area of Bellingham.

From the description of Beverly B. Dobbs Alaska photograph album, circa 1903-1907 [graphic]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269363715

B.B. Dobbs (1868-1937) was active as a photographer and also was a pioneer in the emerging motion picture business in both Alaska and Washington State during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; he is believed to be one of the first individuals to have used motion picture film north of the Arctic Circle.

Born Beverly Bennett Dobbs near Marshall, Missouri, he first learned photography in Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1888, Dobbs moved to Bellingham, Washington, where he would operate a photography studio for twelve years (including a partnership with F.F. Fleming under the name Dobbs & Fleming between 1890-1891). Lured by the gold rush, Dobbs moved to Nome, Alaska in 1900, but ultimately found more success documenting life in Alaska as a photographer and filmmaker. By 1903, he had formed a partnership with A.B. Kinne. The Dobbs & Kinne studio in Nome offered photography services and photo supplies. Dobbs photographed scenes in Nome and the Seward Peninsula and made award-winning portraits of the Inuit people (more commonly referred to at the time as Eskimos). Around 1909, he established the Dobbs Alaska Moving Picture Company, producing Atop of the World in Motion, a collection of travelogues. Just a few years later, Dobbs began to focus exclusively on filmmaking. He sold his photography negatives to the Lomen Brothers (who later issued some of his work under their company name). By 1914, he had set up the Dobbs Totem Film Company in Seattle, Washington. Dobbs is listed as the cinematographer for A Romance of Seattle, a film shot in and around Seattle in 1919. During the 1930s, Dobbs photographed fish processing operations at Pacific American Fisheries (PAF) in the Fairhaven area of Bellingham.

Running from 1 June through 16 October 1909 and attracting some 3.7 million visitors, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (AYPE), was an international fair held in Seattle, Washington. Noted landscape design firm, Olmsted Brothers (John C. and Frederick Law, Jr.), designed much of the AYPE grounds. Popular attractions included the Eskimo Building, animal sculptures composed of fruits and nuts, and the Pay Streak amusement area, which held the Igorrote Village and the Fairy Gorge Tickler ride. Although the AYPE boasted its own official photographer, other photographers, both professional and amateur, also produced images of the fair, some of which survive.

From the description of B.B. Dobbs Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition photographs, 1909 [graphic]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 263440630

B.B. Dobbs (1868-1937) was active as a photographer and also was a pioneer in the emerging motion picture business in both Alaska and Washington State during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; he is believed to be one of the first individuals to have used motion picture film north of the Arctic Circle.

Born Beverly Bennett Dobbs near Marshall, Missouri, he first learned photography in Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1888, Dobbs moved to Bellingham, Washington, where he would operate a photography studio for twelve years (including a partnership with F.F. Fleming under the name Dobbs & Fleming between 1890-1891). Lured by the gold rush, Dobbs moved to Nome, Alaska in 1900, but ultimately found more success documenting life in Alaska as a photographer and filmmaker. By 1903, he had formed a partnership with A.B. Kinne. The Dobbs & Kinne studio in Nome offered photography services and photo supplies. Dobbs photographed scenes in Nome and the Seward Peninsula and made award-winning portraits of the Inuit people (more commonly referred to at the time as Eskimos). Around 1909, he established the Dobbs Alaska Moving Picture Company, producing Atop of the World in Motion, a collection of travelogues. Just a few years later, Dobbs began to focus exclusively on filmmaking. He sold his photography negatives to the Lomen Brothers (who later issued some of his work under their company name). By 1914, he had set up the Dobbs Totem Film Company in Seattle, Washington. Dobbs is listed as the cinematographer for A Romance of Seattle, a film shot in and around Seattle in 1919. During the 1930s, Dobbs photographed fish processing operations at Pacific American Fisheries (PAF) in the Fairhaven area of Bellingham.

From the description of Beverly B. Dobbs photographs, circa 1900-1912 [graphic]. ca. 1900-1912. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 54948615

The son of a farmer, Beverly Bennett Dobbs was born in 1868 near Marshall, Missouri. At age 8, he moved with his parents to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he learned photography. In 1888, Dobbs moved to Bellingham, Washington, and operated a photography studio for 12 years, including a partnership in 1890-1891 with F.F. Fleming under the name Dobbs & Fleming. He married Dorothy Sturgeon of Bellingham in 1896, then moved to Nome, Alaska, in search of gold in 1900. Dobbs continued to earn his living as a photographer, and by 1903, he had formed a partnership with the photographer A.B. Kinne from San Francisco. The Dobbs & Kinne studio in Nome offered photography services and photo supplies. Dobbs photographed scenes in Nome and the Seward Peninsula and made portraits of Native Alaskans. He was awarded a gold medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis World’s Fair) in 1904 for his Native Alaskan photographs.

By about 1909, Dobbs had started Dobbs Alaska Moving Picture Co., making him one of the first to use motion picture film north of the Arctic Circle. He made a name for himself as a filmmaker with Atop of the World in Motion (also called Top of the World in Motion ), a collection of his motion picture travelogues detailing the Alaska gold rush. By 1911, it is probable that Dobbs was focusing only on his moving picture business; he no longer had his photography supply store, and had sold his photography negatives to the Lomen Brothers, who later issued some of his work under their name. By 1914, Dobbs had returned to Seattle and was managing the Dobbs Totem Film Company. He is listed as the cinematographer for A Romance of Seattle, a film shot in and around Seattle in 1919. In his later years he specialized in developing motion picture films in his studio at his home. During the 1930s, Dobbs photographed the fish processing operations at Pacific American Fisheries (PAF) in the Fairhaven area of Bellingham. He died at age 69 in 1937.

From the guide to the Beverly B. Dobbs Alaska Photograph Album, circa 1903-1907, (University of Washington Libraries Special Collections)

The son of a farmer, Beverly Bennett Dobbs was born in 1868 near Marshall, Missouri. At age 8, he moved with his parents to Lincoln, Neb., where he learned photography. In 1888, Dobbs moved to Bellingham, Wash., and operated a photography studio for 12 years, including a partnership in 1890-1891 with F.F. Fleming under the name Dobbs & Fleming. He married Dorothy Sturgeon of Bellingham in 1896, then moved to Nome, Alaska, in search of gold in 1900. Dobbs continued to earn his living as a photographer, and by 1903, he had formed a partnership with the photographer A.B. Kinne from San Francisco. The Dobbs & Kinne studio in Nome offered photography services and photo supplies. Dobbs photographed scenes in Nome and the Seward Peninsula and made portraits of Inuit people (Eskimos). He was awarded a gold medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis World’s Fair) in 1904 for his Eskimo photographs.

By about 1909, Dobbs had started Dobbs Alaska Moving Picture Co., making him one of the first to use motion picture film north of the Arctic Circle. He made a name for himself as a filmmaker with Atop of the World in Motion (also called Top of the World in Motion ), a collection of his motion picture travelogues detailing the Alaska gold rush. By 1911, it is probable that Dobbs was focusing only on his moving picture business; he no longer had his photography supply store, and had sold his photography negatives to the Lomen Brothers, who later issued some of his work under their name. By 1914, Dobbs had returned to Seattle and was managing the Dobbs Totem Film Company. He is listed as the cinematographer for A Romance of Seattle, a film shot in and around Seattle in 1919. In his later years he specialized in developing motion picture films in his studio at his home. During the 1930s, Dobbs photographed the fish processing operations at Pacific American Fisheries (PAF) in the Fairhaven area of Bellingham. He died at age 69 in 1937.

From the guide to the Beverly B. Dobbs Photographs, ca. 1900-1912, (University of Washington Libraries Special Collections)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Greely, Clyda Schott. Clyda Schott Greely photograph collection, ca. 1887-1926. [graphic]. Alaska state library
creatorOf Dobbs, B. B. (Beverly Bennett). B.B. Dobbs Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition photographs, 1909 [graphic]. University of Washington Libraries
creatorOf Beverly B. Dobbs Alaska Photograph Album, circa 1903-1907 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Dobbs, B. B. (Beverly Bennett). Beverly B. Dobbs Alaska photograph album, circa 1903-1907 [graphic]. University of Washington Libraries
referencedIn Beverly B. Dobbs Alaska Photograph Album, circa 1903-1907 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Kloke, Fritz. Fritz Kloke photograph collection [graphic], ca. 1892-1905. Alaska state library
creatorOf Dobbs, B. B. (Beverly Bennett). Beverly B. Dobbs photographs, circa 1900-1912 [graphic]. University of Washington Libraries
creatorOf Hunt, William E. William E. Hunt collection [graphic], 1900-1910. Alaska state library
creatorOf Hegg, Eric A., 1867-1948. Eugene E. Ailes collection, 1900-1902. Anchorage Museum Atwood Resource Center, ANCHORAGE MUSEUM OF HIST & ART LI
creatorOf Scott, John Holmes. John Holmes Scott photograph collection, 1900-1916. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library
referencedIn Michael Cirelli collection on Northwest photography, 1865-2000, 1890s-1910s Museum of History & Industry Sophie Frye Bass Library
creatorOf Beverly B. Dobbs Photographs, ca. 1900-1912 University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
creatorOf Wetherbee, Percy Jasper. Percy Wetherbee photographs, circa 1895-1909. Anchorage Museum Atwood Resource Center, ANCHORAGE MUSEUM OF HIST & ART LI
referencedIn Mildred Morgan Photograph Album, 1908-1910 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909 : Seattle, Wash.) corporateBody
associatedWith Cirelli, Michael, 1944-2002 person
associatedWith Dobbs, B. B.  (Beverly Bennett) person
associatedWith Greely, Clyda Schott. person
associatedWith Hot Air Mining Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Hunt, William E. person
associatedWith Kloke, Fritz. person
associatedWith Pioneer Mining Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Scott, John Holmes. person
associatedWith University of Washington. Libraries. Digital Initiatives Program. corporateBody
associatedWith Wetherbee, Percy Jasper. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Alaska
Washington (State)--Seattle
Seattle (Wash.)
Nome (Alaska)
Nome (Alaska)
Nome (Alaska)
Nome (Alaska)
Alaska
Alaska
Alaska
Alaska--Nome
Subject
Alaska
Basketball players
Basketball players
Basketball teams
Basketball teams
City and town life
Eskimo children
Eskimo children
Eskimos
Eskimos
Eskimo women
Eskimo women
Exhibitions
Expeditions and Adventure
Fishing
Fishing
Gold mines and mining
Gold mines and mining
Gold mines and mining
Gold rushes
Gold rushes
Gold rushes
Inuit
Inuit
Inuit
Inuit
Mines and mineral resources
Native Americans
Photographs
Sled dogs
Sled dogs
Occupation
Photographers
Activity

Person

Active 1895

Active 1909

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