J. Paul Getty Museum

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The development of the PhotoArchive/ Library began in the earliest years of the development of the J. Paul Getty Museum during the mid- to late-1950s. Since 1983 the Photo Archive/Library has been part of the Getty Research Institute.

From the description of Photo Archive budget information, 1976-1979. (Getty Research Institute). WorldCat record id: 85173571

After considering various options for expanding his ranch house in Pacific Palisades, California, which had served as a private museum since 1954, J. Paul Getty decided in the fall of 1968 to build a new museum on the same property. The new museum was designed in the form of a first-century Roman country house, based primarily on the plans of the ancient Villa dei Papiri just outside of Herculaneum. Construction began on December 21, 1970, and the museum, commonly called the "Getty Villa," opened to the public on January 16, 1974.

From the description of Getty Villa construction records, 1960, 1964, 1968-1986, undated, (bulk 1971-1974) (Getty Research Institute). WorldCat record id: 85173109

The J. Paul Getty Museum was established as a charitable trust in 1953 by oil tycoon J. Paul Getty in order to house his growing art collections. Getty had been collecting art since the 1930s. The J. Paul Getty Museum originally opened in 1954, with relatively little publicity, in two rooms of Mr. Getty's Ranch House in the Pacific Palisades near Malibu, California. By August 1955 the museum in the Ranch House had six gallery areas. In 1956 Mr. Getty began planning a new antiquities gallery, which was completed and opened to the public in mid-December 1957. Each year the number of museum visitors increased, and though Mr. Getty curtailed his art acquisitions activities beginning in 1958, the museum continued to grow.

In the fall of 1968, after considering various options for expanding the Ranch House, Getty decided to build a separate museum facility on the same property. This new museum was designed in the form of a first-century Roman country house, based primarily on the plans of the ancient Villa dei Papiri just outside of Herculaneum, Italy. The new museum facility opened to the public on January 16, 1974. Although Getty retained the title of Museum Director over the years, he never left his home in England to visit the new museum building, effectively making the Museum Curator or Deputy Director the on-site director. Getty monitored every expense and purchase made by the museum, and staff regularly traveled to Sutton Place, his home outside London, to consult with him on museum matters.

J. Paul Getty died in 1976 without ever seeing his new museum. Much to everyone's surprise Getty bequeathed almost his entire estate to the museum with a mission to promote "the diffusion of artistic and general knowledge." In 1981, when it became clear that the estate funds would soon be available, Harold M. Williams was hired as the first President of the museum trust. The trust then began a year of exploration to determine where it would focus its resources and energies in order to make the greatest possible contribution to the field of art and art history as a whole. The expansion of the Museum's collections combined with the new programs proposed by the trust would require a facility beyond what the Villa site could accommodate. In 1983 the estate funds became available, the trust's name was officially changed from the J. Paul Getty Museum Trust to the J. Paul Getty Trust, and the museum retained the name the J. Paul Getty Museum. The following year Richard Meier & Partners was chosen to design the Getty Center to house the trust, its newly created programs, and a second site for the Museum.

The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Center, which opened to the public in 1997, houses European paintings, drawings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, decorative arts, and European and American photographs. The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa underwent extensive renovation and expansion from 1997-2006 and reopened to the public on January 28, 2006. The Villa houses works of art from the Museum's collection of Greek, Roman, and Etruscan antiquities. The J. Paul Getty Museum seeks to further knowledge of the visual arts by collecting, preserving, exhibiting and interpreting works of art of the highest quality. The Center and the Villa serve diverse audiences through the Museum's permanent collection, changing exhibitions, conservation, scholarship, research, and public programs.

From the description of Exhibition photographs, 1980-2004, (bulk 1990-2004) (Getty Research Institute). WorldCat record id: 226398948

The J. Paul Getty Museum and the J. Paul Getty Trust date to 1953, when J. Paul Getty established the museum as a California charitable trust to house his growing art collections. The museum originally opened in 1954 with two rooms and relatively little publicity, but by August 1955 it had 6 gallery areas. In 1956 plans were begun to construct a new antiquities gallery, which was opened to the public in mid-December 1957 and in September 1960 the galleries underwent a minor remodel. The numbers of visitors increased, and though Getty stopped most purchasing in and around 1958, the museum continued to slowly expand into other parts of the Ranch House until, in the late 1960's, he chose to build the Villa Museum.

Dr. W.R. Valentiner was the first director and curator of the J. Paul Getty Museum from 1953 to March 1, 1955, though he served on the Board of Trustees until his death in 1958. Dr. Paul Wescher became the next curator of the museum in April/May 1954 and served until 1959. Wescher never used the title "Director," only that of "Curator," and it seems likely, though the record is not specific, that J. Paul Getty himself took on the title of "Director." Following Wescher's resignation, Norris Bramlett (a museum trustee and Getty Oil accountant who regularly acted as a moderator between J. Paul Getty and the museum) suggested to Getty that the museum did not need a full-time curator and proposed simply hiring someone with an art history background who knew the collection and proposed that the current museum secretary, Mrs. Anne Marian Jones could fulfill this role [memo from NB to JPG, April 9, 1959]. Jones submitted her resignation on February 6, 1965, effective May 31, 1965, and urged that Burton F. Fredericksen be appointed her successor. Fredericksen served as museum curator from 1965 to 1971 (prior to the hiring of Gillian Wilson as curator of decorative arts), as chief museum curator from 1972 to October 1973 (prior to the hiring of Stephen Garrett as deputy director in 1973), and as curator of paintings from October 1973 to 1984.

From the description of Administration records, 1950-1986, undated. (Getty Research Institute). WorldCat record id: 123408061

The Department of Academic Affairs was created in 1978 to act as a liaison between the J. Paul Getty Museum, other museums, scholarly institutions, and individuals concerned with the study of art history and conservation. It was intended to maximize the full educational potential of all departments in the Museum and to propose and administer scholarly programs and projects. (The department was not charged with the education of the general public or of primary and secondary school students, which was instead the concern of the Department of Public Information at the time.) In 1986 Academic Affairs was merged into the Education Department, which was thereafter known as "Education and Academic Affairs" until the "Academic Affairs" was finally dropped from the title.

Under the guest scholar and visiting conservator programs, specific curatorial programs and conservation departments sponsored guest scholars or conservators for long-term residence and study at the Museum or for week-long seminars and consultation. The Education Department continued to operate the Museum Scholar program until that function was transferred to the Getty Research Institute's Department of Research and Education in 1997 (starting with the 1997-1998 Scholar Year).

From the description of Guest scholar and conservator files, 1978-2005. (Getty Research Institute). WorldCat record id: 664372129

Biography/Administrative History

The J. Paul Getty Museum was established as a charitable trust in 1953 by billionaire J. Paul Getty in order to house his growing art collections. Getty had been collecting art since the 1930s. The J. Paul Getty Museum originally opened in 1954, with relatively little publicity, in two rooms of Mr. Getty's Ranch House in the Pacific Palisades near Malibu, California. By August 1955 the museum in the Ranch House had six gallery areas. In 1956 Mr. Getty began planning a new antiquities gallery, which was completed and opened to the public in mid-December 1957. Each year the number of museum visitors increased, and though Mr. Getty curtailed his art acquisitions activities beginning in 1958, the museum continued to grow.

In the fall of 1968, after considering various options for expanding the Ranch House, Getty decided to build a separate museum facility on the same property. This new museum was designed in the form of a first-century Roman country house, based primarily on the plans of the ancient Villa dei Papiri just outside of Herculaneum, Italy. The new museum facility opened to the public on January 16, 1974. Although Getty retained the title of Museum Director over the years, he never left his home in England to visit the new museum building, effectively making the Museum Curator or Deputy Director the on-site director. Getty monitored every expense and purchase made by the museum, and staff regularly traveled to Sutton Place, his home outside London, to consult with him on museum matters.

J. Paul Getty died in 1976 without ever seeing his new museum. Much to everyone's surprise Getty bequeathed almost his entire estate to the museum with a mission to promote “the diffusion of artistic and general knowledge." In 1981, when it became clear that the estate funds would soon be available, Harold M. Williams was hired as the first President of the museum trust. The trust then began a year of exploration to determine where it would focus its resources and energies in order to make the greatest possible contribution to the field of art and art history as a whole. The expansion of the Museum’s collections combined with the new programs proposed by the trust would require a facility beyond what the Villa site could accommodate. In 1983 the estate funds became available, the trust's name was officially changed from the J. Paul Getty Museum Trust to the J. Paul Getty Trust, and the museum retained the name the J. Paul Getty Museum. The following year Richard Meier & Partners was chosen to design the Getty Center to house the trust, its newly created programs, and a second site for the Museum.

Today the J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic organization serving both general audiences and specialized professionals. The Trust is a not-for-profit institution, educational in purpose and character, that focuses on the visual arts in all of their dimensions. As of 2009 the Trust supports and oversees four programs: the Getty Foundation; the Getty Conservation Institute; and the Getty Research Institute; and J. Paul Getty Museum. The Museum serves a wide variety of audiences through its expanded range of exhibitions and programming in the visual arts from two locations in the Los Angeles area: the Getty Villa near Malibu and the Getty Center in Brentwood.

The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Center, which opened to the public in 1997, houses European paintings, drawings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, decorative arts, and European and American photographs. The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa underwent extensive renovation and expansion from 1997-2006 and reopened to the public on January 28, 2006. The Villa houses works of art from the Museum's collection of Greek, Roman, and Etruscan antiquities. The J. Paul Getty Museum seeks to further knowledge of the visual arts by collecting, preserving, exhibiting and interpreting works of art of the highest quality. The Center and the Villa serve diverse audiences through the Museum's permanent collection, changing exhibitions, conservation, scholarship, research, and public programs.

The Department of Academic Affairs was created in 1978 to act as a liaison between the J. Paul Getty Museum, other museums, scholarly institutions, and individuals concerned with the study of art history and conservation. It was intended to maximize the full educational potential of all departments in the Museum and to propose and administer scholarly programs and projects. (The department was not charged with the education of the general public or of primary and secondary school students, which was instead the concern of the Department of Public Information at the time.) In 1986 Academic Affairs was merged into the Education Department, which was thereafter known as "Education and Academic Affairs" until the "Academic Affairs" was finally dropped from the title.

Under the guest scholar and visiting conservator programs, specific curatorial programs and conservation departments sponsored guest scholars or conservators for long-term residence and study at the Museum or for week-long seminars and consultation. The Education Department continued to operate the Museum Scholar program until that function was transferred to the Getty Research Institute's Department of Research and Education in 1997 (starting with the 1997-1998 Scholar Year).

From the guide to the Guest scholar and conservator files, 1978-2005, (The Getty Research Institute Institutional Records and Archives 1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 1100 Los Angeles, California, 90049-1688 (310) 440-7390 archives@getty.edu)

Administrative History

After considering various options for expanding his ranch house in Malibu California which had served as a private museum since 1954, J. Paul Getty decided in the fall of 1968 to build a new museum on the same property, in the form of a first-century Roman country house, based primarily on the plans of the ancient Villa dei Papiri just outside of Herculaneum. The archaeologist Norman Neuerburg, who had studied the ruins of Herculaneum and was an authority on Roman domestic architecture, was retained as a consultant for the project. The Santa Monica firm Langdon & Wilson was hired as architect, and Stephen Garrett, who had served as Getty’s consultant in the remodeling of a Getty home in Posillipo, Italy, was retained as overseer of the construction. Landscape architect Emmet Wemple designed the gardens, Garth Benton worked on the murals, and Bruce Ptolomy worked on the fountains. The construction itself was done by Dinwiddie Construction Co., with various subcontractors. Construction began on December 21, 1970, and the new museum opened to the public on January 16, 1974. Despite the enthusiastic public response, mixed critical response questioned the decision to recreate an ancient building.

Upon the death of Mr. Getty and the subsequent establishment of the J. Paul Getty Trust, the Getty Villa became part of a larger vision. The Villa was redesigned by architects Machado and Silvetti Associates and reopened in 2006. While most of the Museum's collections are housed at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, the antiquities collection is still housed at the Villa. The Getty Villa serves a varied audience through the permanent collection, changing exhibitions, conservation, scholarship, research, and public programs in an intimate setting overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Public and scholarly programs at the Villa include lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops, symposia, film series, musical concerts, and theatrical performances in the Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman Outdoor Classical Theater.

From the guide to the Getty Villa construction records, 1960, 1964, 1968-1986, undated (bulk 1971-1974), (The Getty Research Institute Institutional Records and Archives 1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 1100 Los Angeles, California, 90049-1688 (310) 440-7390 archives@getty.edu)

Administrative History

The J. Paul Getty Museum was established as a charitable trust in 1953 by oil tycoon J. Paul Getty in order to house his growing art collections. Getty had been collecting art since the 1930s. The J. Paul Getty Museum originally opened in 1954, with relatively little publicity, in two rooms of Mr. Getty's Ranch House in the Pacific Palisades near Malibu, California. By August 1955 the museum in the Ranch House had six gallery areas. In 1956 Mr. Getty began planning a new antiquities gallery, which was completed and opened to the public in mid-December 1957. Each year the number of museum visitors increased, and though Mr. Getty curtailed his art acquisitions activities beginning in 1958, the museum continued to grow.

In the fall of 1968, after considering various options for expanding the Ranch House, Getty decided to build a separate museum facility on the same property. This new museum was designed in the form of a first-century Roman country house, based primarily on the plans of the ancient Villa dei Papiri just outside of Herculaneum, Italy. The new museum facility opened to the public on January 16, 1974. Although Getty retained the title of Museum Director over the years, he never left his home in England to visit the new museum building, effectively making the Museum Curator or Deputy Director the on-site director. Getty monitored every expense and purchase made by the museum, and staff regularly traveled to Sutton Place, his home outside London, to consult with him on museum matters.

J. Paul Getty died in 1976 without ever seeing his new museum. Much to everyone's surprise Getty bequeathed almost his entire estate to the museum with a mission to promote “the diffusion of artistic and general knowledge." In 1981, when it became clear that the estate funds would soon be available, Harold M. Williams was hired as the first President of the museum trust. The trust then began a year of exploration to determine where it would focus its resources and energies in order to make the greatest possible contribution to the field of art and art history as a whole. The expansion of the Museum’s collections combined with the new programs proposed by the trust would require a facility beyond what the Villa site could accommodate. In 1983 the estate funds became available, the trust's name was officially changed from the J. Paul Getty Museum Trust to the J. Paul Getty Trust, and the museum retained the name the J. Paul Getty Museum. The following year Richard Meier & Partners was chosen to design the Getty Center to house the trust, its newly created programs, and a second site for the Museum.

Today the J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic organization serving both general audiences and specialized professionals. The Trust is a not-for-profit institution, educational in purpose and character, that focuses on the visual arts in all of their dimensions. As of 2009 the Trust supports and oversees four programs: the Getty Foundation; the Getty Conservation Institute; and the Getty Research Institute; and J. Paul Getty Museum. The Museum serves a wide variety of audiences through its expanded range of exhibitions and programming in the visual arts from two locations in the Los Angeles area: the Getty Villa near Malibu and the Getty Center in Brentwood.

The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Center, which opened to the public in 1997, houses European paintings, drawings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, decorative arts, and European and American photographs. The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa underwent extensive renovation and expansion from 1997-2006 and reopened to the public on January 28, 2006. The Villa houses works of art from the Museum's collection of Greek, Roman, and Etruscan antiquities. The J. Paul Getty Museum seeks to further knowledge of the visual arts by collecting, preserving, exhibiting and interpreting works of art of the highest quality. The Center and the Villa serve diverse audiences through the Museum's permanent collection, changing exhibitions, conservation, scholarship, research, and public programs.

From the guide to the Exhibition photographs, 1980-2004 (bulk 1990-2004), (The Getty Research Institute Institutional Records and Archives 1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 1100 Los Angeles, California, 90049-1688 (310) 440-7390 archives@getty.edu)

Administrative History

The J. Paul Getty Museum was established as a charitable trust in 1953 by oil tycoon J. Paul Getty in order to house his growing art collections. The J. Paul Getty Museum originally opened in 1954 in two rooms of Mr. Getty's Ranch House in the Pacific Palisades near Malibu, California. Each year the number of museum visitors increased, and though Mr. Getty curtailed his art acquisitions activities beginning in 1958, the museum continued to grow. The development of the library began during the mid to late 1950s primarily to meet the needs of Museum curators. In the early years the library was located in the curator's office between the Ranch House and the Conservation area.

In the fall of 1968 Mr. Getty decided to build a separate museum facility on the Ranch House property. The new museum facility, later referred to as the Getty Villa, opened to the public on January 16, 1974. The library moved to the basement of the Villa upon completion of the building. In 1983 the Museum received J. Paul Getty's estate funds, the trust's name was officially changed from the J. Paul Getty Museum Trust to the J. Paul Getty Trust, and the museum retained the name the J. Paul Getty Museum. In an effort to contribute to the field of art and art history the Trust developed several programs. In 1983 the library began by the Museum in the 1950s became part of the program the Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities (GCHAH). The GCHAH was later renamed the Getty Research Institute (GRI). Today the GRI is home to one of the largest art libraries in the world.

From the guide to the Library inventory and accession records, 1954-1965, 1977, (The Getty Research Institute Institutional Records and Archives 1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 1100 Los Angeles, California, 90049-1688 (310) 440-7390 archives@getty.edu)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn Howard, Jean, 1910-2000. Jean Howard papers, 1930-1990. University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center
creatorOf Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. Research and Academic Program Event Files, 2000-2007 (bulk 2000-2004) Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, The Clark
referencedIn Jean Howard Papers, 1930s-1990s University of Wyoming. American Heritage Center.
referencedIn Valentiner, Wilhelm Reinhold, 1880-1958. Wilhelm Reinhold Valentiner papers, 1860-1974. Smithsonian Archives of American Art
referencedIn Heiting, Manfred. Manfred Heiting papers, 1965-2008. Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - Hirsch Library, Hirsch Library
referencedIn Getty, J. Paul (Jean Paul), 1892-1976. J. Paul Getty diaries, 1938-1946, 1948-1976. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf Cunningham, Charles Crehore, 1910-1979. Curatorial Office Records of Charles Cunningham, 1973-1977. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, The Clark
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Museum. Dept. of Public Information and Visitor Services. Records, 1973-1981, 1984-1991, undated. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Getty Trust Publications. Records, 1975-1999. Getty Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty family collected papers, 1880s-1989, undated (bulk 1911-1977) Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Trust. Press relations records, 1954-2007 Getty Research Library
referencedIn Valentiner, Wilhelm Reinhold, 1880-1958. Wilhelm Valentiner letters to Mary E. Adams, 1954-1957. Smithsonian Archives of American Art
referencedIn Registrar correspondence, 1973-1975 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Institutional file. Brooklyn Museum Libraries & Archives
creatorOf Library inventory and accession records, 1954-1965, 1977 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Getty, J. Paul (Jean Paul), 1892-1976. J. Paul Getty family collected papers, 1880s-1989, and undated, bulk 1911-1977. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Adams, Mary E., 1920-. Oral history interview with Mary and Clinton Adams, 1998 Apr. 24 [sound recording]. Smithsonian Archives of American Art
referencedIn Adams, Mary E., 1920-. Oral history interview with Mary and Clinton Adams, 1998 Apr. 24 [sound recording]. Smithsonian Archives of American Art
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Museum. Dept. of Manuscripts. Photographs of unpacking the Ludwig Collection, 1983. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Curatorial department. Anne Tucker correspondence files, 1974-1999. Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - Hirsch Library, Hirsch Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Photo Archive budget information, 1976-1979. Getty Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Trust. Records and archives administrative records, 1980-1990. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Photographs of unpacking the Ludwig Collection, 1983 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. J. Paul Getty Museum miscellaneous records, 1953-1984. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Otto Wittmann papers, 1932-1996 Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
creatorOf Getty Villa construction records, 1960, 1964, 1968-1986, undated (bulk 1971-1974) Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Julius S. Held papers, ca. 1918-1999 Getty Research Institute
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Getty Villa construction records, 1960, 1964, 1968-1986, undated, (bulk 1971-1974) Getty Research Library
referencedIn Held, Julius S. (Julius Samuel), 1905-2002. Julius S. Held papers, ca. 1918-1999. Getty Research Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Exhibition photographs, 1980-2004, (bulk 1990-2004) Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Guest scholar and conservator files, 1978-2005. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Administration records, 1950-1986, undated. Getty Research Library
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Trust. Trustee and consultant records of Otto Wittmann 1953, 1974-1990, undated, (bulk 1978-1990). Getty Research Library
referencedIn Getty Center, Los Angeles, Calif. : vertical file. Centre canadien d'architecture, | Canadian Centre for Architecture | CCA
referencedIn Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation records, circa 1950-2006, 1986-2006 Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Guest scholar and conservator files, 1978-2005 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty diaries, 1938-1946, 1948-1976 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. Office of Publications Book Files, 1973-1998. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, The Clark
referencedIn Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Curatorial department. Anne Tucker photography subgroup, 1976-1998 Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - Hirsch Library, Hirsch Library
referencedIn Getty Villa renovation design records, 1994-2004 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Records and archives administrative records, 1980-1990 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Museum. Director's Office. John Walsh's records, 1973-1985, undated Getty Research Library
referencedIn Getty Research Institute. Study photographs of museum displays of ancient art. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Christopher D'Arcangelo Papers, Bulk, 1975-1978, 1965-2003 Fales Library & Special Collections
referencedIn Pacific Standard Time oral history interviews with artists, filmmakers, curators, collectors, and critics, 2008-2011 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Videotape collection of Judy Chicago, 1971-2004 Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute
creatorOf J. Paul Getty Museum. Audiovisual materials relating to J. Paul Getty and the J. Paul Getty Museum, 1971-1982, undated. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Pacific Palisades Historical Society. A History: The Cañon de Sentimiento and the J. Paul Getty Museum, ca. 1983. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation. Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation records, circa 1950-2006 (bulk 1986-2006). Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf LA Art Girls. Overflow : A reinvention of Allan Kaprow's fluids [multimedia] / [sponsored by the Getty Research Institute]. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Office of the Director. Peter C. Marzio, Correspondence Files, 1982-2002. Hirsch Library Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Museum. Registrar's Office. Registrar correspondence, 1973-1975. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Stephen White Gallery of Photography. Stephen White Gallery Records, 1943-2000 (bulk 1975-1990). Getty Research Library
creatorOf Exhibition photographs, 1980-2004 (bulk 1990-2004) Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Richard Meier & Partners. Model for a paintings gallery at the Getty Center. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Inventory of Getty publications, 1954-2011 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Curatorial Department. George T.M. Shackelford correspondence files, 1984-1995 Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - Hirsch Library, Hirsch Library
referencedIn Press relations records, 1954-2007 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Trust. Board of Trustees. Records, 1953-2000. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Machado and Silvetti Associates, Inc. Getty Villa renovation design records, 1994-2004. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
creatorOf Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Office of the Registrar. Brassaï: The Eye of Paris, exhibition files, 1985-1999. Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - Hirsch Library, Hirsch Library
referencedIn Records, 1975-1999 Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Fredericksen, Burton B. Collecting with Mr. Getty : a conversation with Burton Fredericksen, Stephen Garrett, and Gillian Wilson [videorecording] / [sponsored by the J. Paul Getty Museum]. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Neuerburg, Norman. Papers regarding Getty Villa design and construction, 1966-1987, bulk 1970-1975. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Kastner, Victoria. William Randolph Hearst and J. Paul Getty : collectors of antiquities [videorecording] / [lecture by] Victoria Kastner ; [sponsored by the J. Paul Getty Museum]. Getty Research Institute, Research Library
referencedIn Miklos Rozsa Papers, 1918-1996 Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries
referencedIn Papers of Daniel Robbins and Seymour Slive, (inclusive), (bulk), 1959-2003, 1971-1982 Harvard Art Museum Archives, Harvard University
referencedIn French & Company records, 1910-1998, 1950-1960 Getty Research Institute
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Museum. Director's Office. Director Stephen Garrett's records, 1954-1985, undated (bulk 1969-1982). Getty Research Library
referencedIn J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Villa planning and construction documentation. Getty Research Library
referencedIn Norman Neuerburg papers regarding Getty Villa design and construction, 1966-1987, 1970-1975 Getty Research Institute
referencedIn French & Company (New York, N.Y.). French & Company records, 1911-1998 (bulk 1950-1969) Getty Research Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Direct Relationships
Relation Name
associatedWith Adams, Mary E., 1920- person
associatedWith Art Properties, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Birkmeyer, Karl. person
associatedWith Bramlett, Norris person
associatedWith Bramlett, Norris. person
associatedWith Brealey, John M. person
associatedWith Briant, Elizabeth. person
associatedWith Capodieci, Barbara J. person
associatedWith Corzo, Miguel Angel. person
associatedWith Cunningham, Charles Crehore, 1910-1979. person
associatedWith D'Arcangelo, Christopher person
associatedWith Dinwiddie Construction Co., Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Dinwiddie Construction Company corporateBody
associatedWith Duke, Lani. person
associatedWith Englander, Nancy. person
associatedWith Fink, Eleanor E. person
associatedWith Forster, Kurt Walter. person
associatedWith Fox, Janet. person
associatedWith Fredericksen, Burton B. person
associatedWith Frel, Jirí. person
associatedWith Frel, Jiří person
associatedWith French & Company (New York, N.Y.) corporateBody
associatedWith French & Company (New York, N.Y.) corporateBody
associatedWith Fusco, Laurie S. person
associatedWith Garrett, Stephen, 1922- person
associatedWith Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Getty Center (Los Angeles, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Getty, George F. 1924-1973. person
associatedWith Getty, Gordon. person
associatedWith Getty, J. Paul (Jean Paul), 1892-1976. person
associatedWith Getty Research Institute. corporateBody
associatedWith Getty Trust Publications. corporateBody
associatedWith Getty Villa (Malibu, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Getty Villa (Malibu, Calif.) corporateBody
associatedWith Hecht, David S. person
associatedWith Heiting, Manfred. person
associatedWith Held, Julius S. (Julius Samuel), 1905-2002. person
associatedWith Howard, Jean, 1910-2000 corporateBody
associatedWith Howard, Jean, 1910-2000. person
associatedWith Jones, Anne Marian. person
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Museum. Dept. of Manuscripts. corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Museum. Dept. of Public Information and Visitor Services corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Museum. Director's Office corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Museum. Director's Office. corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Museum. Publications corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Museum. Registrar's Office. corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Trust. corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Trust. Board of Trustees. corporateBody
associatedWith J. Paul Getty Trust. Communications Department corporateBody
associatedWith Judy Chicago person
associatedWith Kren, Thomas, 1950- person
associatedWith Langdon and Wilson Architects corporateBody
associatedWith Langdon & Wilson, Architects. corporateBody
associatedWith Lehman, Yole. person
associatedWith Machado and Silvetti Associates, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Curatorial department. corporateBody
associatedWith Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Curatorial department. corporateBody
associatedWith Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Curatorial Department. corporateBody
associatedWith Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Office of the Director corporateBody
associatedWith Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Office of the Registrar. corporateBody
associatedWith Neuerburg, Norman. person
associatedWith Pacific Palisades Historical Society. corporateBody
associatedWith Pacific Standard Time (Project) corporateBody
associatedWith Park and Co., Ltd. corporateBody
associatedWith Richard Meier & Partners. corporateBody
correspondedWith Robbins, Daniel person
associatedWith Rózsa, Miklós, 1907-1995 person
associatedWith Staniskis, Joseph A. person
associatedWith Stephen White Gallery of Photography. corporateBody
associatedWith Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. corporateBody
associatedWith Stothart, Herbert. person
associatedWith Valentiner, Wilhelm Reinhold, 1880-1958. person
associatedWith Watson, F. J. B. 1907-1992. person
associatedWith Wescher, Paul, b. 1894. person
associatedWith Whitworth, Frank. person
associatedWith Williams, Harold. person
associatedWith Williams, Harold Marvin, 1928- person
associatedWith Wilson, Gillian. person
associatedWith Wilson, Gillian, 1941- person
associatedWith Wittmann, Otto person
associatedWith Wittmann, Otto, 1911-2001. person
associatedWith Zeri, Federico. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Malibu (Calif.)
Pacific Palisades (Los Angeles, Calif.)
Malibu (Calif.)
Subject
Museum finance
Photography of art
Museums--Acquisitions
Art museums--Educational aspects
Nonprofit organizations--Employees
Nonprofit organizations
Theft from museums
Museums--Trials, litigation, etc
Art--Handling
Art museums--Exhibitions
Nonprofit organizations--Trials, litigation, etc
Art museums--Design and construction
Art museum architecture
Building--Details
Architecture--Decision making
Liability insurance
Art museums--Library resources
Landscape construction
Conflict of interests
Building--Equipment and supplies
Building designers
Decorative art
Building sites--Planning
Landscape gardening
Art--Exhibitions
Budget
Nonprofit organizations--Taxation
Licenses
Art--Conservation and restoration
Nonprofit organizations--Insurance
Building--Estimates
Architecture--Designs and plans
Nonprofit organizations--Accounting
Architecture--Roman influences
Art museums--Maintenance and repair
Museum libraries
Art museums
Art insurance
Art museums--Employees
Museums--Collections management
Art--Provenance
Art--Exhibition techniques
Museum visitors
Zoning
Buildings--Specifications
Art--Collectors and collecting
Museums--Management
Learning and scholarship
Bibliography
Art historians--Research
Employee fringe benefit
Contractors' operations
Museum trustees
Museums
Nonprofit organizations--Finance
Art Forgeries
Art--Protection
Art objects--Conservation and restoration
Gifts
Art objects--Collectors and collecting
Nonprofit organizations--Buildings
Building materials
Art--Packing
Buildings--Repair and reconstruction
Servitudes
Museums--Security measures
Buildings--Environmental engineering
Occupation
Function
Administration of nonprofit organizations
Management of art museums

Corporate Body

Active 1980

Active 2004

Americans

English

Information

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Ark ID: w6g48w27

SNAC ID: 51058284