Hedgeman, Anna Arnold, 1899-1990

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African American civil rights leader and educator.

From the description of Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1944-1952. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70984193

Anna Arnold Hedgeman (1899-1990) spent more than six decades working in the fields of interfaith and civil rights organizing, government service, and urban affairs. The author of two memoirs, The Trumpet Sounds (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964) and The Gift of Chaos (Oxford, 1977), Hedgeman was a pioneer in opening civil service and political jobs to African-American women.

Raised in Minnesota, Hedgeman was the first African-American graduate of Hamline University in St. Paul. From 1924 to 1933, she served as an administrator for the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) in Ohio, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, including five years as membership secretary of the Harlem branch. She married musician Merritt Hedgeman in 1933.

During the New Deal and early years of World War II, Hedgeman worked for the Emergency Relief Bureau, was a consultant on racial problems for New York City, and monitored race relations for the Federal Office of Civilian Defense. In 1944, the Hedgemans relocated to Washington, D.C., where she became executive director of A. Philip Randolph's National Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Commission. After working on Harry Truman's presidential election in 1948, Hedgeman was appointed to an administrative position in the Federal Security Agency.

From 1954 to 1958, Hedgeman was a mayoral aide in the cabinet of Robert F. Wagner, Jr. As was often the case throughout her career, Hedgeman was the first African-American woman appointed to this post. From 1958 to 1962, she worked briefly in business and also covered civic and international affairs as a radio commentator and New York Age columnist.

In the 1960s, Hedgeman was at the center of national civil rights organizing and was the first female member on the administrative planning committee for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Returning to ecumenical work from 1963 to 1967, Hedgeman served in several capacities for the National Council of Churches' Commission on Religion and Race, where she coordinated efforts of clergy and lay leaders to win passage and ensure implementation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Hedgeman started a consulting service and throughout the 1970s worked as a freelance specialist on interfaith activism, urban affairs, and black studies. She also continued her commitment to public service as a member of countless community committees and government advisory bodies until her death in 1990.

From the description of Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1953-1983. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122378673

Anna Arnold Hedgeman (1899-1990) spent more than six decades working in the fields of interfaith and civil rights organizing, government service, and urban affairs. The author of two memoirs, The Trumpet Sounds (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964) and The Gift of Chaos (Oxford, 1977), Hedgeman was a pioneer in opening civil service and political jobs to African-American women.

Raised in Minnesota, Hedgeman was the first African-American graduate of Hamline University in St. Paul. From 1924 to 1933, she served as an administrator for the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) in Ohio, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, including five years as membership secretary of the Harlem branch. She married musician Merritt Hedgeman in 1933.

During the New Deal and early years of World War II, Hedgeman worked for the Emergency Relief Bureau, was a consultant on racial problems for New York City, and monitored race relations for the Federal Office of Civilian Defense. In 1944, the Hedgemans relocated to Washington, D.C., where she became executive director of A. Philip Randolph's National Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Commission. After working on Harry Truman's presidential election in 1948, Hedgeman was appointed to an administrative position in the Federal Security Agency.

From 1954 to 1958, Hedgeman was a mayoral aide in the cabinet of Robert F. Wagner, Jr. As was often the case throughout her career, Hedgeman was the first African-American woman appointed to this post. From 1958 to 1962, she worked briefly in business and also covered civic and international affairs as a radio commentator and New York Age columnist.

In the 1960s, Hedgeman was at the center of national civil rights organizing and was the first female member on the administrative planning committee for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Returning to ecumenical work from 1963 to 1967, Hedgeman served in several capacities for the National Council of Churches' Commission on Religion and Race, where she coordinated efforts of clergy and lay leaders to win passage and ensure implementation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Hedgeman started a consulting service and throughout the 1970s worked as a freelance specialist on interfaith activism, urban affairs, and black studies. She also continued her commitment to public service as a member of countless community committees and government advisory bodies until her death in 1990.

From the guide to the Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1953-1983, (The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn A. Philip Randolph Papers, 1909-1979, (bulk 1941-1968) Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
referencedIn Black Women Oral History Project. Records, 1976-1997 (inclusive). Harvard University, Schlesinger Library
referencedIn Papers, 1827-1985 Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute
referencedIn Gollin, Albert E. Bureau of Social Science Research files, 1962-1970. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn United Church Board for Homeland Ministries. Race Relations Dept (1943-1970). Archives. 1943-1970. Tulane University, Amistad Research Center
referencedIn Bureau of Social Science Research files, 1962-1970 The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.
creatorOf Anna Arnold Hedgeman Papers, 1944-1952 Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
creatorOf Hedgeman, Anna Arnold, 1899-1990. Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1944-1952. Library of Congress
referencedIn Papers, 1892-1990 Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute
referencedIn Bethune, Mary McLeod, 1875-1955. Mary McLeod Bethune papers, 1928-1943. Lincoln Memorial University Library, Carnegie-Vincent Library
creatorOf Hedgeman, Anna Arnold, 1899-1990. Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1953-1983. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Interviews of the Black Women Oral History Project, 1976-1981 Harvard University, Schlesinger Library
referencedIn The, Daily Worker, and, The Daily World, Photographs Collection, Bulk, 1930-1990, 1920-2001 Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive
referencedIn Polier, Justine Wise, 1903-1987. Papers, 1892-1990 (inclusive). Harvard University, Schlesinger Library
referencedIn Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip), 1889-1979. A. Philip Randolph papers, 1909-1979 (bulk 1941-1968). Library of Congress
creatorOf Anna Arnold Hedgeman papers, 1953-1983 The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.
referencedIn Horace Mann Bond Papers, 1830-1979, 1926-1972 Special Collections and University Archives, UMass Amherst Libraries
Role Title Holding Repository
Place Name Admin Code Country
Employment
United States
United States
United States
Subject
African Americans--Civil rights
African Americans
African Americans--Education
Educational change
African Americans--Religion
Racism--United States
Discrimination in employment
Civil rights
African Americans--Employment
Black author
African American women political activists
Discrimination in employment--United States
African American authors
Racism
African American women civil rights workers
Labor unions
Civil rights--United States
Educational change--United States
Occupation
Civil rights leaders
Educators
Function

Person

Birth 1899-07-05

Death 1990-01-17

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