Woodson, Carter Godwin, 1875-1950

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1875-12-19
Death 1950-04-03
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Educator and historian.

From the description of Carter Godwin Woodson papers, 1922-1941. (Moorland-Spingarn Resource Center). WorldCat record id: 741968475

Considered the Father of Black History, Carter Godwin Woodson was an African-American historian, author, and journalist. In 1915 he founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, and in 1926 he pioneered the concept of a "Negro History Week," which was later expanded into Black History Month. Charles H. Wesley was an African-American historian, author, and college president.

From the description of Carter Godwin Woodson correspondence with Charles H. Wesley, 1925-1950. (Princeton University Library). WorldCat record id: 313656571

Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875-April 3, 1950) was one of the foremost African American intellectuals of the 20th century. Educated at Berea College and the University of Chicago, he was the second person of African descent to earn a PhD in history from Harvard University. Affectionately regarded as the "Father of Negro History," he founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1915 and the Journal of Negro History in 1916. In 1921 he created Associated Publishers, which became the leading African-American-owned publishing firm producing scholarly books, novels, poetry, and children's and young adult books for the African American community and the general public. He created Negro History Week (now known as Black History Month) in 1926 and the Negro History Bulletin in 1937 to promote the teaching of African American history, the work to which he devoted his life.

From the description of Carter Godwin Woodson collection, 1876-1999. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 232674445

Biographical Note

Carter Godwin Woodson

  • 1875, Dec. 19: Born, New Canton, Va.
  • 1903: Litt. B., Berea College, Berea, Ky.
  • 1907: A.B., University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • 1908: A.M., University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
  • 1908 - 1918 : High school teacher, Washington, D.C.
  • 1912: Ph.D., Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
  • 1916 - 1950 : Executive director, Association for the Study of Negro Life and History Editor, Journal of Negro History
  • 1918: Published A Century of Negro Migration. Washington, D.C.: Association for the Study of Negro Life and History
  • 1918 - 1919 : Principal, Armstrong Manual Training School, Washington, D.C.
  • 1919 - 1920 : Dean, School of Liberal Arts, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
  • 1920 - 1922 : Dean, West Virginia Collegiate Institute, Institute, W.Va.
  • 1922: Published The Negro in Our History. Washington, D.C.: Associated Publishers
  • 1926: Published The Mind of the Negro as Reflected in Letters Written during the Crisis, 1800-1860. Washington, D.C.: Association for the Study of Negro Life and History
  • 1936: Published The African Background Outlined; or, Handbook for the Study of the Negro. Washington, D.C.: Association for the Study of Negro Life and History
  • 1937 - 1950 : Editor, Negro History Bulletin
  • 1950, Apr. 3: Died, Washington, D.C.

Whitefield McKinlay

  • 1857, Sept. 15: Born, Charleston, S.C.
  • 1873: Attended Avery Institute, Charleston, S.C.
  • 1874: Attended United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y.
  • 1882: Attended Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa
  • 1887: Attended University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. Married Kate Wheeler
  • 1887 - 1941 : Real estate broker
  • 1907: Appointed to Housing Commission, District of Columbia, by President Theodore Roosevelt
  • 1910: Appointed collector of Port of Washington, D.C., by President William H. Taft
  • 1941, Dec. 14: Died, Washington, D.C.

Benjamin T. Tanner

  • 1835, Dec. 23: Born, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • 1852 - 1857 : Attended Avery College, Allegheny, Pa.
  • 1857 - 1860 : Attended Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pa.
  • 1858: Married Sarah Elizabeth Miller
  • 1860: Ordained, deacon and elder, African Methodist Episcopal Church
  • 1868: Chief secretary, African Methodist Episcopal Church
  • 1868 - 1884 : Editor, Christian Recorder
  • 1884: Editor and cofounder, A.M.E. Church Review
  • 1888: Bishop, African Methodist Episcopal Church
  • 1923, Jan. 15: Died, Philadelphia, Pa.

John T. Clark

  • 1883, July 21: Born, Louisville, Ky.
  • 1906: A.B., Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • 1907 - 1913 : Instructor, Central High School, Louisville, Ky.
  • 1913 - 1916 : Secretary, Housing Bureau of the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes, New York, N.Y.
  • 1916 - 1917 : Field secretary, National Urban League
  • 1917: Married Patricia Ferguson
  • 1917 - 1926 : Executive secretary, Urban League of Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • 1926 - 1949 : Executive secretary, Urban League of St. Louis, Mo.
  • 1949: Died, St. Louis, Mo.

From the guide to the Carter Godwin Woodson Papers, 1736-1974, (bulk 1915-1950), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

  • 1875 Dec. 19: Born of ex-slave parentage in New Canton, Va.
  • 1892: Moved to Huntington, West Va.
  • 1895: Entered Douglass High School, Huntington, West Va.
  • 1903: Received Litt. B. Degree from Berea College in Kentucky.
  • 1903 - 1906 : Served as Supervisor of schools in the Philippines.
  • 1908 Mar. 17: Received B.A. Degree from the University of Chicago.
  • 1908 Aug. 28: Received M.A. Degree from the University of Chicago.
  • 1912: Received Ph.D. Degree from Harvard.
  • 1915 Sept. 9: Organized and founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in Chicago, Ill.
  • 1916 Jan.1: Published the first issue of the Journal of Negro History.
  • 1918: Appointed Principal of Armstrong High School, Washington, D.C.
  • 1919 - 1920 : Served as Dean of the School of Liberal Arts at Howard University.
  • 1920 - 1922 : Served as Dean of West Virginia Institute (now West Virginia State College)
  • 1926: Received the Spingarn Medal
  • 1926: Inaugurated Negro History Week
  • 1937 October: Published the first I of Negro History Bulletin.
  • 1941: Received LL. D. Degree from Virginia State College.
  • 1950 April 3: Died in Washington, D.C.

From the guide to the Carter G. Woodson Papers, 1922-1941, (Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University)

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Subjects:

  • African Americans--Employment
  • African Americans--History--Sources
  • Customs administration--Washington (D.C.)
  • Dwellings
  • African American historians--20th century--Correspondence
  • Race relations
  • Slavery--United States
  • African Americans--Societies, etc
  • Black race--Encyclopedias
  • Blacks
  • Blacks--South America
  • Railroads--Employees--Labor unions
  • Blacks--Caribbean Area
  • Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
  • African Americans--Study and teaching
  • Ports of entry--Washington (D.C.)
  • African Americans
  • Blacks--Africa
  • Blacks--20th century--Sources
  • African American periodicals
  • African American History Month--History--Sources
  • African Americans--History
  • State governments--United States
  • Real estate business--Washington (D.C.)
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Race discrimination
  • African American publishers
  • African Americans--Social life and customs

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Collector
  • Historians

Places:

  • Africa (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • United States history (as recorded)
  • West Virginia--Huntington (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Huntington (W. Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)