Earl Y. Henderson papers, 1916-1931.

ArchivalResource

Henderson, Earl Y. Earl Y. Henderson papers, 1916-1931.

Earl Y. Henderson papers, 1916-1931.

Correspondence to and from Henderson, Indian reports written and collected by Henderson. Folder one contains correspondence between Henderson and Malcolm McDowell while Henderson was stationed at Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, Alabama. The reports are mostly typescript copies. Those in folder two are published documents and include documents pertaining to the Havasupai Indian Agency, Arizona, Supai Trail, reorganization of the Indian service. Folder three has all handwritten items regarding the State of Washington Indian treaties, including notes titled "Washington Notes", map of Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho, unbound manuscript titled "Lands of Indians in the State of Washington West of the Cascade Mountains." Folder four contains typed notes by Henderson titled "Notes on Acoma Pueblo", 1919. Folder five contains Board of Indian Commissioners' reports regarding the Crow Creek, and Lower Brule Indian Reservations, South Dakota, Cherokee Indian Reservation, North Carolina, Choctaw Indians of Mississippi, and a history of the Indian Bureau from 1824 to 1924. Correspondence to and from Henderson and Indian reports written and collected by Henderson. Folder one contains correspondence between Henderson and Malcolm McDowell while Henderson was stationed at Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, Alabama. The reports are mostly typescript copies. Those in folder two are published documents and include documents pertaining to the Havasupai Indian Agency, Arizona, Supai Trail, reorganization of the Indian service. Folder three has all handwritten items regarding the State of Washington Indian treaties, including notes titled "Washington Notes," map of Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho, unbound manuscript titled "Lands of Indians in the State of Washington West of the Cascade Mountains." Folder four contains typed notes by Henderson titled "Notes on Acoma Pueblo," 1919. Folder five contains Board of Indian Commissioners' reports regarding the Crow Creek, and Lower Brule Indian Reservations, South Dakota, Cherokee Indian Reservation, North Carolina, Choctaw Indians of Mississippi, and a history of the Indian Bureau from 1824 to 1924. Folder six, typed reports regarding Cherokee Indians of North Carolina and Choctaw Indians of Mississippi, 1927. Also correspondence from Charles H. Burke to McDowell discussing Henderson's work with the Cherokees. Folder seven, reports regarding the Havasupai, Truxton, and Colorado River, Indian Agencies in Arizona, and the Fort Yuma Indian Agency in California, also the Fort Mojave Indian School. Folder eight, reports regarding Neah Bay, and Tahola, Indian Agencies. Folder nine, reports on Tulalip Indian Agencies in Washington and the Nonreservation Indians at the Carson Agency in Nevada. Folder ten, reports regarding the Walker River Indian Agency and Western Shoshone Indian Reservation in Nevada. Folder eleven, reports regarding the Paiute Indian Agency in Utah and the Sells Indian Agency in Arizona. Multiple copies of most of the reports.

11 folders.

Related Entities

There are 12 Entities related to this resource.

Burke, Charles H.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w69w2959 (person)

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Lower Brulé Agency.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6m67n4s (corporateBody)

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Crow Indian Agency

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6867kx5 (corporateBody)

The Crow Indian Agency was established in Montana Territory by a treaty concluded at Fort Laramie on May 7, 1868. An earlier treaty had been made at Fort Laramie on September 17, 1851, establishing various tribal boundaries in Montana, but had never been ratified formally. The 1868 treaty provided for the construction of an agency complex on the south side of the Yellowstone River near Otter Creek, and the assignment of Indian agents to locally administer tribal affairs and relations with the Un...

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Western Shoshone Agency

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ck48g6 (corporateBody)

McDowell, Malcolm

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United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Tulalip Agency

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6qp2932 (corporateBody)

The Superintendent of Indian Affairs was an official position that was established to regulate contacts between Native Americans and settlers. The Superintendents had a general responsibility to handle affairs in the Territory, negotiate treaties and clear titles to land. Indian agents were appointed by the President of the United States with the approval of the United States Senate. The Oregon Superintendence established in 1848, when the Oregon Territory was organized. It had jurisdiction over...

Huntington Free Library

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United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Taholah Indian Agency

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6839mp5 (corporateBody)

United States. Office of Indian Affairs

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p59t3f (corporateBody)

United States bureau with responsibility for Indian relations. From the description of Letter, 1846. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122699812 Develops and implements, in cooperation with tribal governments, Native American organizations, other federal agencies, state & local governments, and other interested groups, economic, social, educational, and other programs for the benefit and advancement of Indian and Alaska native people. Established in 1824 within the War Dept...

Henderson, Earl Y.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6pv6hfz (person)

Henderson was the Assistant Secretary of the Board of Indian Commissioners. McDowell was Secretary of the Board of Indian Commissioners. Burke was commissioner of the Office of Indian Affairs. From the description of Earl Y. Henderson papers, 1916-1931. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 71271219 ...

United States. Board of Indian Commissioners

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The Board of Indian Commissioners was established by a act of Congress in 1869. This Board functioned as an independent agency of the federal government serving as an adviser on Indian affairs to the President, the Department of the Interior, and the Congress. After sixty-four years of service, the Board was abolished in 1933. From the description of Records, 1869-1919. (Newberry Library). WorldCat record id: 40474798 ...

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Cherokee Indian Agency (N.C.)

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6160bnv (corporateBody)