Cabell, Wylie, and Richmond-in-Virginia in the 1920s [manuscript] 1979.

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MacDonald, Edgar E. Cabell, Wylie, and Richmond-in-Virginia in the 1920s [manuscript] 1979.

Cabell, Wylie, and Richmond-in-Virginia in the 1920s [manuscript] 1979.

MacDonald's article discusses the literary group which was centered in Richmond during the 1920's or the "James Branch Cabell Period" in honor of the Cabell centenary. This group included Cabell, Carl Van Vechten, Emily Clark Balch, Hunter Stagg, Ellen Glasgow and Elinor Hoyt Wylie. The article particularly describes the reception given to Elinor Wylie by the group when her novel, Jennifer Lorn brought her into prominence.

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Related Constellations

There are 7 Constellations related to this resource.

Wylie, Elinor, 1885-1928

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x34xwk (person)

Elinor Wylie was an American novelist and poet. From the description of Elinor Wylie collection of papers, 1885-1950 bulk (1902-1928). (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 86164221 From the guide to the Elinor Wylie collection of papers, 1885-1950, 1902-1928, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.) Poet and author. Full name: Elinor Morton Hoyt Hichborn Wiley BeneĢt. Married to Philip Hichbo...

Stagg, Hunter T. (Hunter Taylor), 1895-1960

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6sn0vkg (person)

Hunter Taylor Stagg was born in the city of Richmond, the younger son of Thomas E. and Sarah Stagg on 29 May 1895. Kicked in the head by a horse at the age of seven, Stagg became prone to seizures later in life. Stagg attended the Richmond school run by John Peyton McGuire and in 1921 joined with three other "literary minded" individuals (Mary Dallas Street, Emily Clark (Balch) and Margaret Freeman (who married James Branch Cabell in 1950) to establish The Reviewer, a literary magazine. "Hunter ...

Clark, Emily, 1893-1953

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6765r1h (person)

Virginia author. From the description of Stuffed peacocks: (manuscript and proofs), 1927. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 32958550 ...

Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6kd21ds (person)

Carl Van Vechten was an American novelist, critic, essayist, book collector, and photographer. From the description of Carl Van Vechten collection of papers, 1922-1964. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122455166 From the guide to the Carl Van Vechten collection of papers, 1911-1964, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.) Carl van Vechten (1880-1964) was an American photographer, writer,...

MacDonald, Edgar E.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6m36fm5 (person)

Edgar Edgeworth MacDonald was born in Richmond on 5 March 1919, the son of John Edgar and Marie Edgeworth MacDonald. He attended the University of Virginia (1936-1938), Sorbonne, University of Paris (1947- 1948), Richmond Professional Institute [VCU] (B.S.), University of Richmond (M.A.) and the University of Paris, D. de l'Universit鮠A professor of English at Randolph-Macon College from 1953 until his retirement in 1984, Dr. MacDonald is currently the Senior Cabell Scholar at Virginia...

Glasgow, Ellen Anderson Gholson, 1873-1945

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p26x4z (person)

American novelist. From the description of Letter, 1940 Apr. 25, Richmond, Va., to John W. Garley, Bayonne, N.J. [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647808544 From the description of Letters to James J. Murray [manuscript], 1939-1943. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647812081 American author. From the description of Letter [manuscript]: Richmond, Va., to Dr. Kenneth Wood, 1942 December 14. (University of Virginia). W...

Cabell, James Branch, 1879-1958

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6z89dvv (person)

Richmond author James Branch Cabell (1879-1958) is best known for his controversial Jurgen (1919), one of several ironic fantasies he wrote that took place in the mythical medieval world of Poictesme (Pwa- tem). Jurgen, laced with erotic overtones, was considered pornographic by some, and a trial over its content brought the reclusive writer national fame. Throughout the 1920s, Cabell was highly regarded by his literary peers -- H.L. Mencken, Sinclair Lewis, and others praised his works. His med...