Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced German Scholars records, 1933-1936.

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Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced German Scholars. Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced German Scholars records, 1933-1936.

Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced German Scholars records, 1933-1936.

Consists largely of correspondence from the Assistant Secretary of the Emergency Committee, Edward R. Murrow, to the chairman of its Executive Committee, Livingston Farrand. Included is correspondence of or about Kurt Lewin.

.4 cubic ft.

Related Entities

There are 5 Entities related to this resource.

Murrow, Edward R. (Edward Roscoe), 1908-1965

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mt4gs9 (person)

Edward Roscoe Murrow (April 25, 1908 – April 27, 1965), born Egbert Roscoe Murrow, was an American broadcast journalist and war correspondent. He first gained prominence during World War II with a series of live radio broadcasts from Europe for the news division of CBS. During the war he recruited and worked closely with a team of war correspondents who came to be known as the Murrow Boys. After the war, in December 1945 Murrow an offer to become a vice president of the CBS network and head o...

Cornell University

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Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced German Scholars

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Farrand, Livingston, 1867-1939

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6c24wvd (person)

Livingston Farrand was born in 1867 in Newark, New Jersey. He graduated from Princeton University in 1888, and took an M.D. degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. He was an instructor in psychology at Columbia University, and later adjunct professor. Interested in primitive psychology, he joined expeditions to the Pacific northwest with Franz Boas and others, and was appointed professor of anthropology at Columbia in 1903. Farrand was deeply concerned with public health ...

Lewin, Kurt, 1890-1947

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Kurt Lewin is commonly recognized as the founder of social psychology. He was born in 1890 in the Village of Moglino in the Prussian province of Posen. Although completing the requirements for a PhD. in 1914, Lewin was not awarded the degree until 1916 from the University of Berlin. In 1932, he attended Stanford University as a visiting professor and in 1933, immigrated to the U.S. In that same year he became a faculty member of Cornell University. In 1935, he became a professor at ...