Correspondence with Marian Anderson, 1958.

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National Negro Opera Company. Correspondence with Marian Anderson, 1958.

Correspondence with Marian Anderson, 1958.

2 items (4 l.)

Related Entities

There are 4 Entities related to this resource.

Ferebee, Dorothy Boulding, 1898?-1980

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6np2swj (person)

Physician, administrator, and activist, of Boston, Mass., and Washington, D.C.; b. 1898. From the description of Papers, 1910-1980. (Moorland-Spingarn Resource Center). WorldCat record id: 70953364 Physician. From the description of Reminiscences of Dorothy Boulding Ferebee : oral history, 1979. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 122513781 ...

Duncan, John, 1890-

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6hh8xpt (person)

John Bonner Duncan (1910-1994), graduate of Howard University and Terrell Law School; first African-American to be appointed commissioner of the District of Columbia, 1961. Appointed, 1967 as assistant to the secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior for Urban Relations; consultant in housing development, 1969-1989. From the description of John B. Duncan papers, 1932-1989 (bulk 1960-1977). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 35899483 ...

Dawson, Mary Cardwell, 1894-1962

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6p56sfc (person)

Opera director, concert singer, teacher, conductor and impresario, Dawson was the founder, president and general manager of the National Negro Opera Company. Formed in 1941 due to Dawson's concern regarding the lack of opportunity for Afro-Americans in opera because of racial discrimination, for over 20 years the Company presented such productions as Verdi's Aida and La Traviata, and C.C. White's Ouanga. Among the featured opera singers were Minto Cato, Lillian Evanti, Muriel Rahn, Edward Boatne...

National Negro Opera Company (U.S.)

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66b25db (corporateBody)

The National Negro Opera Company was managed and directed by its founder, Mary Cardwell Dawson (1894-1962). The company was founded in 1941. In the late 1940s, Mrs. Dawson moved to Washington, D.C., which then became the center of company activities. There were active chapters in Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, New York, Pittsburgh, and Red Bank, New Jersey. In 1950, the National Negro Opera Foundation was incorporated to help raise funds to sustain the company. The company ceased operations with...