Autobiography, [n.d.].

ArchivalResource

Autobiography, [n.d.].

This volume is an extract of Whitney's unpublished autobiography, giving a partial account of various episodes in his life as a supporter and practitioner of eugenics. There are observations on the American Eugenics Society, the Eugenics Record Office, the Leopold-Loeb murder trial, as well as mentions of Charles B. Davenport, Clarence Darrow, Harry H. Laughlin, and Margaret Sanger.

50 p.

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There are 6 Entities related to this resource.

Sanger, Margaret, 1879-1966

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6xt6kxw (person)

Margaret Louise Higgins was born in Corning, New York, on September 15, 1879, the sixth of eleven children and the third of four daughters born to Anne Purcell Higgins and Michael Hennessey Higgins, a stone mason. Her two elder sisters worked to supplement the family income, and financed her education at Claverack College, a private coeducational preparatory school in the Catskills. After leaving Claverack, Higgins took a job teaching first grade to immigrant children, but decided after a short ...

Darrow, Clarence S. (Clarence Seward), 1857-1938

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67q9pzg (person)

Clarence Seward Darrow, prominent Chicago trial lawyer, was born in Kinsman, Ohio on April 18, 1857. He attended Allegheny College, after which he studied one year at the University of Michigan Law School. He then worked as a lawyer in Youngstown, and was admitted to the Ohio Bar in 1878. He practiced in Ohio for nine years, before moving to Chicago, where he practiced privately before being appointed assistant corporation counsel for the City of Chicago. For four years he served as Chi...

Davenport, Charles Benedict, 1866-1944

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6q81g5h (person)

Charles B. Davenport was a biologist and director of the Department of Genetics at the Carnegie Institution of Washington (1904-1934). From the description of Papers, 1874-1944. (American Philosophical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 122488735 Charles B. Davenport's influence and efforts at Cold Spring Harbor, New York, began in 1898 when he became the director of the summer school of the Biological Laboratory, a position he held until 1923. The lab was administered by...

Whitney, Leon F. (Leon Fradley), 1894-1973

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6h139b5 (person)

Leon Fradley Whitney (1894-1973), biologist and verterinarian, was the author of juvenile fiction and books on the care of pets. From the description of Leon Fradley Whitney papers, 1931, 1950. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702131625 Leon Fradley Whitney was a biologist and promoted sterilization in eugenics. From the description of Autobiography, [n.d.]. (American Philosophical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 122409239 From the guide to the Leon ...

Laughlin, Harry Hamilton, 1880-1943

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x64877 (person)

Harry Laughlin was director of the Eugenics Records Office in Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island from 1910-1940. Laughlin, as one of the leaders in the eugenics movement, was interested in genetics research and furthering the eugenical cause. From the description of Harry H. Laughlin papers, 1910-1939. (Truman State University). WorldCat record id: 50916227 ...

American eugenics society

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6517szf (corporateBody)

The Second International Conference on Eugenics, held in New York in 1921, produced one concrete result: the American Eugenics Society. Although the eugenics movement had been gaining strength in the United States for over a decade, there was at the time no formal organization through which to pursue its broader political and educational agenda. As a result, a group of prominent eugenicists founded the Eugenics Committee of the U.S.A., which became the Eugenics Society of America, a...