United States. Emergency Board No. 217

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In 1956 and 1957, U.S. Emergency Board No. 116 heard a dispute between carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees and employees represented by the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Parties to the dispute, which was over wages and paid holidays, included 175 class 1 railroads and 160,000 operating railroad workers.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 116. Reports and exhibits, 1956-1957., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

Emergency Board No. 119 heard a dispute between the General Managers' Association of New York Harbor Railroads and the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, over the issue of wage increases.

On November 21, 1956, the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots presented the General Managers' Association of New York Harbor Railroads with their demands for a new collective agreement. These included a 35 percent increase in pay for captains and pilots and a 25 cents per hour increase for mates, deckhands, and other crew members. In addition, the union asked for a pay differential of $1.50 per day for motormen and ferry wheelmen. The railroads countered by offering a package of wage increases that was similar to that which had been established in negotiations with the non-operating railroads. When no agreement was reached after four months of negotiations, the union set a July 21, 1957 strike date. A federal mediator persuaded them to extend that deadline to August 7. President Dwight D. Eisenhower invoked section 10 of the Railway Labor Act and forced the union to return to work for a sixty day "cooling off period", while an Emergency Board tried to mediate the dispute. On September 20, the Board encouraged the union to accept a collective agreement which was similar to the one that had been offered to it by the railroads. The Masters, Mates and Pilots rejected this proposal and voted to strike on October 17. This strike, however, lasted for only 90 minutes, as both sides soon accepted a federal mediator's suggestion to settle on a 32 cents an hour wage increase.

From the description of New York Harbor Railroads vs. International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots. Documents, 1956-1957. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64752546

On May 22, 1953, railroad workers, represented by fifteen non-operating railway labor unions, submitted a series of demands to the Akron, Canton and Youngstown Railroad Company and other carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers Conference Committees, to be incorporated into a new collective agreement. They included a twenty-five percent increase in wages, two additional weeks of vacation, five additional paid holidays, premium pay for Sunday work, comprehensive health and welfare insurance, and free transportation for employees and their families. The carriers countered by demanding that the union agree to thirty-one work rule changes that they claimed would increase productivity. When an impasse was reached, a Presidential Emergency Board was appointed to mediate.

This Board began deliberating on January 19, 1954. The carriers stressed the importance of the "pattern settlement" that had been agreed to previously by several operating and non-operating unions. This settlement included incorporation into the regular wage rates of thirteen cents per hour in old cost-of-living adjustments, a wage increase of five cents per hour, and a third week of vacation for those workers with fifteen years of service. The unions argued that this "pattern settlement" was inadequate and had no bearing on their controversy with the railroads. The report that the Emergency Board filed was supportive of the carriers' position. It recommended the "pattern settlement" and asked both the workers and the railroads to share the cost of health insurance. It also called for the adoption of certain work rule changes that the railroads considered to be important.

From the description of United States. Emergency Board No. 106. Akron, Canton and Youngstown Railroad Company and other carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. fifteen cooperating (non-operating) labor unions. Proceedings and exhibits, 1953-1954. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64091527

U.S. Emergency Board No. 129 was created by the president on April 18, 1960 to investigate a dispute between the Long Island Railroad Company and the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen.

The dispute was brought about by union demands for a reduction in the workweek without a reduction in pay for passenger service trainmen and all workers in local freight service, for the yard brakemen's rate for all switchtenders, and for payment of a ninety-five percent daily allowance to yard trainmen for handling air hoses. Management countered with demands for standard rates of pay in passenger and freight service, the right to the sole determination of the arrangement of runs, the discontinuance of certain extra payments, and the changing of certain work and employment rules. The Board disallowed all the union requests and sustained the carrier's demand for sole determination of runs and the elimination of a rule which "encourages employees to... claim available regular assignments so that they may receive the emoluments of the most profitable extra jobs... without working them."

From the description of United States. Emergency Board No. 129. Long Island Railroad Company vs. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Documents, 1957-1960, bulk, 1960. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 63890967

U.S. Emergency Board No. 138 was created in 1961 by President Kennedy in response to a strike called by the Order of Railroad Telegraphers against the Southern Pacific Railroad Co.

A dispute arose when the Telegraphers, in response to severe job cutbacks due to abandonments and automation, requested that no position in existence as of April 1st, 1958 be abolished or discontinued except by agreement between the carrier and the Telegraphers. The union invoked mediation because the parties were unable to come to any agreement. Before the mediation efforts were exhausted, the Telegraphers proposed rules which barred unilateral transfer of any functions, work and positions performed or held by telegraphers; required payment of severence pay to displaced workers; and guaranteed a certain minimum to telegraphers when they consented to the merger or consolidation of jobs. Negotiations were continued but when no agreement was reached, the Telegraphers successfully requested the service of the National Mediation Board again.

The Board was appointed in July and met that month and the following August. Reporting in September, the Board concluded that the union's position as stated was "Neither a practical nor realistic solution to the problem of employee displacement" and recommended that the carrier and union agree to protections for adversely affected employees, including dismissal pay, moving expenses and property loss allowances.

From the description of United States. Emergency Board No. 138. Southern Pacific Company (Pacific Lines) vs. Order of Railroad Telegraphers. Proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961, bulk 1961. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 63890970

U.S. Emergency Board No. 81 was established in February of 1950 in response to the announced intention of the Order of Railway Conductors of America and the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen to withdraw from the service of the railroads represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees, in connection with their demands for changes in work rules and the addition of new ones.

At issue was the institution of a 40 hour workweek, graduated rate of pay tables, the restoration of standard wage rates between territories, and pay differentials for certain classes of railroad employee, among lesser points of dispute.

On June 15, the Board issued its report recommending, among other things, a five day, forty-hour basic workweek for rail yard service employees, with an increase of 18 cents per hour, effective October 1, 1950. It also recommended certain rule changes proposed by the carriers.

From the description of Carriers represented by the Eastern, Western and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. Order of Railway Conductors of America and the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen. Documents, 1950. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 63890960

In 1956 and 1957, U.S. Emergency Board No. 116 heard a dispute between carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees and employees represented by the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Parties to the dispute, which was over wages and paid holidays, included 175 class 1 railroads and 160,000 operating railroad workers.

The Emergency Board recommended an increase of 26 1/2 cents per hour to be given in three steps over a three year agreement. It also proposed seven paid holidays for regular service yardmen but turned down a similar holiday allowance for operating craft workers.

From the description of Carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Documents, 1956-1957. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64755517

U.S. Emergency Board No. 133 was appointed in 1960 to settle a dispute between certain carriers represented by the New York Harbor Carriers' Conference Committee and labor organizations which were members of the Railroad Marine Harbor Council.

The dispute began with various labor unions proposing changes in and additions to existing agreements under Section 6 of the Railway Labor Act. The unions took the position that they should not be compared to or treated as railroad employees but should have the same consideration as seamen. This was rejected by the Board. The Board also dealt with the substance of the demands regarding wages, welfare benefits, and improved holiday and vacation benefits. It recommended a two percent base increase, elimination of the cost-of-living escalator, broadened the category of employee eligible for holiday pay, and provided for a sixty day notice regarding the elimination of a position.

From the description of United States. Emergency Board No. 133. New York Harbor Carriers' Conference Committee vs. Railroad Marine Harbor Council. Exhibits, 1960. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64091528

The Emergency Board created under the President's Executive Order #10155 dated November 15, 1951, was composed of Mr. David L. Cole, labor consultant, Patterson, N.J., as Chairman: Mr. Aaron Horwitz, Attorney, New York City, and Mr. George E. Osborne, Professor of Law, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. Hearings were held in Washington, D. C., from December 11 to 17, 1951 and January 8 to 29, 1952.

The report to the President on February 14, 1952, recommended that:

1. The parties enter into a Joint National Agreement, through their duly designated representatives in accordance with the usual custom, providing for a union-shop agreement as proposed by the organizations in their notices of February 5, 1951, to the several carriers, parties to this dispute, in the form substantially as used in the union-shop agreements; with the New York Central System Lines, with certain exceptions;

2. The afore-mentioned Joint national Agreement to provide for the deduction of dues, initiation fees, and assessments and that the details be worked out in substantially the same manner as is provided for in the agreement of August 3, 1951, between the New York Central Railroad System Lines and these organizations, with certain modifications.

Among the exceptions recommended by the Emergency Board were:

1. That all positions not represented by the organization, all fully excepted positions, and all positions covered in the scope rule only in a nominal or token manner, be covered by a union shop agreement;

2. Provide that no claims against the carrier shall arise or begin to accrue in favor of a discharged employee or any other employee or the union prior to a final determination of the dispute, such time to include the time during which action against the carrier is stayed by any court.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 98. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1951., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

The Mine Workers, on November 30, 1956, requested a modification of its current agreement with the companies, and submitted twenty proposals. Negotiations began and the companies submitted five counter proposals. The services of the National Mediation Board were requested on February 5, 1957 and mediation continued until March 22 without any success, The Mediation Board suggested arbitration, which the union rejected.

On May 9, 1957 the President of the United States appointed an emergency board consisting of Nathan Cayton, Dudley E. Whiting and Morrison Handsaker. Hearings were held and the Board visited and inspected the docks of two of the companies. Wages, fringe benefits, working rules and grievances were among the twenty-five issues involved.

The Board's report was prepared in three parts, since some recommendations applied to all three companies and some did not, and issued on June 7. 1957.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 118. Transcripts of proceedings and exhibits, 1945-1957., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

U.S. Emergency Board No. 138 was created in 1961 by President Kennedy in response to a strike called by the Order of Railroad Telegraphers against the Southern Pacific Railroad Co.

A dispute arose when the Telegraphers, in response to severe job cutbacks due to abandonments and automation, requested that no position in existence as of April 1st, 1958 be abolished or discontinued except by agreement between the carrier and the Telegraphers. The union invoked mediation because the parties were unable to come to any agreement. Before the mediation efforts were exhausted, the Telegraphers proposed rules which barred unilateral transfer of any functions, work and positions performed or held by telegraphers; required payment of severence pay to displaced workers? and guaranteed a certain minimum to telegraphers when they consented to the merger or consolidation of jobs. Negotiations were continued but when no agreement was reached, the Telegraphers successfully requested the service of the National Mediation Board again.

The Board was appointed in July and met that month and the following August. Reporting in September, the Board concluded that the union's position as stated was "Neither a practical nor realistic solution to the problem of employee displacement" and recommended that the carrier and union agree to protections for adversely affected employees, including dismissal pay, moving expenses and property loss allowances.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 138. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University.)

The agreement between the parties -was scheduled to expire on January 1, 1961. Both the Company and the Association filed the required notices of intention to change the agreement in October 1960. Negotiations were begun in November and continued to the end of December when the parties requested the services of the National Mediation Board.

Numerous mediation sessions were held during the next four months, but no agreement was reached, so the National Mediation Board suggested arbitration as required by the Railway Labor Act. This was accepted by the Company and rejected by the Association, On September 15, 1961 the Mediation Board closed its file.

negotiations were resumed and continued to March 2, 1962 but no final agreement could be reached. On March 18, the Association notified the Company of its intention to strike on March 21.

There were more than one hundred separate proposals for revisions in the contract affecting recognition, scope, wages, hours, flight-time pay and credits, training, seniority, adjustment of grievances, vacations, sick leave, insurance benefits and many others, but the issue of crew complement was the central problem in this as in other disputes.

On March 20, 1962, by Executive Order 11011, the President created an Emergency Board consisting of James 0. Hill, Thomas C. Begley and Arthur W. Sempliner. Hearings were held from April 3 to April 18, 1962, and a report and recommendations issued on May 1, 1962.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 146. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1951-1962., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

Executive order of the President dated January 13, 1951, resulted in the appointment of an emergency board composed of Mr. David L. Cole, labor consultant of Paterson, N.J., as Chairman; Hon. Frank P. Douglass, former Chairman of the national Mediation Board of Pine, Colorado; and Mr. Aaron Horvitz, Attorney of New York, N. Y.

Public hearings were begun in Washington, D.C. on January 25, 1951, and on January 29 the proceedings were moved to New York City. These hearings continued until April 27, 1951, and at the conclusion of the hearings. : the board met jointly with the parties, also separately, in an effort to secure a settlement of the disputes by mutual agreement but without success. The record consists of 4,770 pares of testimony and argument and 106 exhibits. Extension of time to May 28, 1951, for report of the board was approved by the President. The report was made on May 25, 1951.

The complicated issues in dispute had been the subject of continuous negotiation and mediation, lasting almost 18 months, and had resulted in the taking of a strike vote. A major issue resulted from the request of the Air Line Pilots Association to place limitations on the number of miles pilots would be required to fly each month, depending upon the speed of the the plane; other changes of rate formulae for pilots and copilots were in dispute, a total of 27 issues as broken down in the board's report.

In its report, the board recommended a sizeable increase for copilots, which will average $1,800 per year. The board did not recommend reduction in flying hours below what they now are. The board recommended increased vacation allowance for captains, a provision guaranteeing more free time for all pilots, a minimum-pay guarantee, improved sick leave, furlough allowance for pilots with two or more years' seniority, and increased meal allowances. Other recommendations included a no-strike clause to be made part of the new agreement and that machinery be established for submitting unsettled grievances over dismissals and interpretation of the contract to a form of arbitration.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 94. Transcripts and exhibits, 1951., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

An Emergency Board was appointed by the President on June 19, 1958 to investigate and report on the dispute which had arisen out of notices of intended change in the collective bargaining agreement between the parties. Members of the Board were James A. Healy, chairman, Maynard E. Persig, and Benjamin C. Roberts.

Hearings were begun on July 9 and continued to August 18th. Early In the hearings it became apparent that the principal reason for the failure of mediation efforts over a period of months was the Inability of the parties to resolve the question of whether or not Issues relating to turbine powered aircraft were a proper part of the negotiations. Other issues Involved were wages, scheduling, working conditions, travel time and crew compliment. Once the issues were clarified the Board recommended that the parties resume collective bargaining.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 124. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1939-1958., 1939-1958., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

On September 1, 1961 the Organizations served the Carriers with a "Section 6 Notice," giving the customary 30 day notice, of a desire to revise and supplement all existing agreements, effective November 1, 1961 in two respects; (l) All pay rates to be raised 25 cents per hour on that date, and (2) Six month's notice to be given to employees to be affected by a reduction in force or abolition of positions, except in certain emergency situations.

The Carriers made the following counter proposals; (l) Reduce by SO per cent the rates of pay of certain groups of middle and lower range employees, (2) Establish entry rates for seven groups at 80 per cent of existing rates, to be increased by 4 per cent per annum until established rates are reached, (3) Establish flat $1.25 hourly rate for diner car waiters and others who serve food and drinks, and (4) Eliminate all rules or provisions which require more than 24 hour advance notice prior to abolition of positions or reduction of force.

On September 21, 1961 the Organizations invited the Carriers to meet on the issues. On October 5, the Carrier replied that they would consider the matter later. On October 10, 1961 the Organizations invoked mediation.

The parties met in Washington, D. C. on January 10, 1962 to negotiate, where virtually nothing was accomplished. The Organizations declined the National Mediation Board's offer of arbitration whereupon certification of the dispute to the President and the appointment of the Emergency Board followed.

The Board consisting of Saul Wallen, Chairman, and Laurence E. Seibel and Edward A. Lynch met with the parties in Chicago on March 6, 1962. Hearings were held there and in Washington for a total of 15 days. The Board also attempted to mediate the differences between the parties but failed. The Board issued its report on May 3, 1962.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 144. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1949-1962., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

For many years Local 996, International Longshoremen's Association joined with the Nonoperating Railway Labor Organizations in negotiations and their agreement followed the national pattern. In 1957 the Local chose to negotiate directly with the carriers and signed an agreement on July 22.

On October 31, 1959 the Local notified the Carriers it would like to change the agreement, increasing the basic daily rate from $18.69 to $25. In addition, the Local would like a cost of living escalator clause, 20 cents per day added to the travel allowance, changes in the vacation agreement and an increased number of paid holidays, sick leave pay and severance pay.

The Carriers' countered with proposals to change the assignment rules, overtime provisions, and a reduction in paid holidays and no changes in the current wage rates.

Several negotiating meetings were held, but no progress in reaching an agreement was made, and on September 29, 1960 the Local broke off negotiations and set October 21, 1960 as the date to strike.

On January 12, 1961 the President created the Emergency Board of James T. O'Connell, Harold M. Gilden and David R. Douglass. The Board held hearings until February l6, 1961 and submitted its report on March 6, 1961.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 134. Transcripts of Proceedings, 1961, (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University.)

Prior to 1918 several independent express agencies for delivering freight from the railroad car to the customer existed in the railroad industry . In 1918 several of the independents merged to form the American Railway Express Company, and in 1929 it was purchased by the Class I rail roads and renamed Railway Express Agency.

While many of the employees were used jointly as express or railroad employees, and the laws which apply to the rail- road industry were applied to the agency, the vehicular drivers were represented by both the teamsters and the railway clerks. This led to constant friction, each organization trying to secure more for its members than the other.

Following an appeal to the National Mediation Board in 1937, a mediation agreement was signed, giving the teamsters jurisdiction over chauffeurs, helpers and garage men in New York, Newark, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis and San Francisco. The balance of the employees were to be members of the railway clerks.

The Mediation Agreement did not eliminate all the friction. Eighteen emergency boards had been appointed by the president to resolve disputes between the parties prior to the current one.

On January 1. 1955 the teamsters sent a letter to the Agency expressing a desire to revise and modify the rules of the locals operating in New York City. The request was acknowledged and a conference arranged at which the company proposed that the national agreement with the teamsters apply to New York City as well as to the other cities. Several conferences were held, but no agreement was reached. The National Mediation Board took jurisdiction on May 12, but was unable to compose the difference in mediation. The organizations proposed to stop work on July 4, 1955.

The President appointed an emergency board consisting of Robert G. Simmons, Benjamin C. Roberts and Morrison Handsaker under Executive Order 10622 on July 1, 1955. The Board held bearings and submitted its report to the President on August 1, 1955.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 111. Transcripts and exhibits, 1955., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

In April 1959 the Railroad Trainmen served notice on all the carriers with which it had contractual relations in which it was requested that the cost-of-living increases be included in the basic rates and the basic rate increased fourteen percent, effective November 1, 1959.

National negotiations were undertaken on this basis, but on November 12, 1959 the Trainmen served twelve demands on the Long Island Rail Road in addition, for local negotiation, and two days later the carriers countered with their demands. Local negotiations were unsuccessful, and the mediation services of the National Mediation Board were invoked, but no settlement resulted. The Mediation Board then certified the controversy to the President, who invoked the emergency board procedure of the Railway Labor Act.

Curtis G. Shake was named chairman and Edward A. Lynch and Lloyd H. Bailer were appointed to the board. Hearings were held in New York beginning April 26, 1960.

The Trainmen presented four issues to the board as follows:

1. All short turn-around passenger rules now providing for 26 days work be revised to read "22 days work" and that said rules continue to contain all provisions now existing.

2. All men in local freight service be given a five-day work week with seven days pay.

3. Yard brakeman's rate for all switchtenders.

4. All assignments not now receiving 95 cents air hose allowance in yard service will be given said allowance under the same conditions that other men are paid.

The Carriers demands were:

1. Payment of standard rates of pay in passenger and freight service

2. Carrier will have the sole prerogative of arranging its runs to meet the requirements of its service.

3. Discontinuance of payments under so-called "make whole" rule.

4. Elimination of time and one-half payments for a second tour of duty within 24 hours in road freight service.

5. Eliminate requirements with respect to the manner in which road crews pick up and dispose of their train and handle their cabin car.

6. Carrier will have the prerogative of transferring Extra Men from one yard to another without agreement.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 129. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1953-1960., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

U.S. Emergency Board No. 133 was appointed in 1960 to settle a dispute between certain carriers represented by the New York Harbor Carriers' Conference Committee and labor organizations which were members of the Railroad Marine Harbor Council.

The dispute began with various labor unions proposing changes in and additions to existing agreements under Section 6 of the Railway Labor Act. The unions took the position that they should not be compared to or treated as railroad employees but should have the same consideration as seamen. This was rejected by the Board. The Board also dealt with the substance of the demands regarding wages, welfare benefits, and improved holiday and vacation benefits. It recommended a two percent base increase, elimination of the cost-of-living escalator, broadened the category of employee eligible for holiday pay, and provided for a sixty day notice regarding the elimination of a position.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 133. Exhibits, 1960., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

An Executive order of the President dated February 24, 1950 resulted in the appointment of a board composed of Hon. Roger I. McDonough, justice, Supreme Court of Utah, Chairman, Hon. Mart J. O'Malley former justice, Supreme Court of Indiana; and Professor Gordon S. Watkins, University of California. Public hearings were held in Chicago, Illinois, beginning March 2, 1950, through May 9, 1950 the record consisting of 49 volumes of 8,385 pages, and 143 exhibits.

Upon stipulation of the parties and approval of the President, two extensions of time were granted, allowing to June 15, 1950, for rendition of the Board's report to the President.

The emergency precipitating the establishment of this- board resulted from the announced intention of the employees represented by the two organizations, to withdraw from the service of the railroads represented by the Carriers' Conference Committees, in connection with their demands for proposed new rules and changes in existing rules governing working conditions affecting primarily conductors, trainmen, yard service employees, and certain dining car and other groups of employees, altogether about 180,000 employees of the nation's major railroads.

The issues were numerous and complex, involving such matters as the 40-hour workweek; differentials for car retarder operators, footboard yardmasters, and baggage-men handling United States mail; graduated rate of pay tables in all classes of service; the restoration of the standard wage rates between territories; and modification of other rules. Also involved were carriers' proposals to change pay provisions, rules, regulations, interpretations, and practices pertaining to the 40-hour workweek (if recommended) interdivisional, and intradivisional runs; pooling of cabooses; switching limits; and numerous other proposals.

On June 15, 1950, the board made its report to the President, recommending a 5-day, 40-hour basic workweek for railroad yard service employees, with an increase in basic rates of pay of 18 cents per hour, effective October 1, 1950. Upward adjustments in rates of pay for car retarder operators, footboard yardmasters and baggagemen handling United States mail were also recommended. The board recommended the withdrawal of a number of other proposals of the organizations, including one which called for a graduated basis of pay for road conductors and trainmen. The board also recommended against the establishment of a 100-mile, 5-hour basic day in passenger service to replace the 150-mile, 7 1/2-hour basic day. Among the changes in rules proposed by the railroads, the board recommended that the carriers and the organizations negotiate revisions in rules to permit interdivisional runs, pooling of cabooses, and changes in yard switching limits; redefinition of rules covering coupling and uncoupling air hoses; inclusion of a rule covering rate of pay for work performed in more than one class of service in a tour of duty, and change in reporting for duty rules. It recommended the withdrawal of other carrier proposed rules changes.

During the course of the hearings in this case, two additional disputes on similar issues were referred to this same board by the President. (See Emergency Boards Nos. 83 and 84).

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 81. Transcripts and exhibits, 1950., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

On May 22, 1953, railroad workers, represented by fifteen non-operating railway labor unions, submitted a series of demands to the Akron, Canton and Youngstown Railroad Company and other carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers Conference Committees, to be incorporated into a new collective agreement. They included a twenty-five percent increase in wages, two additional weeks of vacation, five additional paid holidays, premium pay for Sunday work, comprehensive health and welfare insurance, and free transportation for employees and their families. The carriers countered by demanding that the union agree to thirty-one work rule changes that they claimed would increase productivity. When an impasse was reached, a Presidential Emergency Board was appointed to mediate.

On May 22, 1953, the employees submitted a series of proposals to the Carriers concerning changes in rules and working conditions the rejection of which by the carriers gave rise to this dispute. The carriers countered with 31 proposed changes in rules and working conditions, 16 of which were subsequently withdrawn, said proposals being rejected by the organizations. The dispute was referred to the National Mediation Board on October 20, 1953. A formal proffer of arbitration was subsequently made to the parties which was accepted by the organizations and declined by the carriers.

The emergency board created under the President's Executive Order dated December 28, 1953, was composed of Charles E. Loring, Tucson, Arizona (Chairman), Adolph E. Wenke, Lincoln, Nebraska and Martin P. Catherwood, Ithaca, New York. Hearings commenced in Chicago, Illinois on January 19, 1954, and continued until April 3, 1954.

In substance, the organizations' proposals can be summarized as follows: (1) More extended vacations; (2) holidays with pay; (3) premium pay for Sunday work as such; (4) a comprehensive health and welfare program to be provided by the carriers; and (5) increased free transportation for employees and their families. In varying degrees, the carriers' proposals related to the impact of craft or class lines and of seniority on employment and on work assignments. The organizations took the position that the carriers' proposals were advanced primarily for bargaining purposes and were without merit, but that if there was any merit in such proposals, the only approach was through bargaining at the individual carrier level. The carriers insisted that the organizations' proposals for a health and welfare program and for improved free transportation were not bargainable under the Railway Labor Act and therefore should not be considered by the Board. Carriers stressed the importance of the so-called "pattern settlement," along with certain rules changes, as the only proper settlement of the dispute. Much evidence and argument was submitted on the 1 subject of pattern relationships in wage and fringe benefits among various groups of railroad employees, especially in view of the fact that the "pattern settlement" was offered to and accepted by substantial groups of the operating employees and some of the nonoperating employees not before this Board. The organizations, on the other hard, argued that the "pattern settlement" was inadequate and inappropriate and had no bearing on the present controversy. The "pattern settlement" referred to included: (1) Incorporation in the regular wage rates of some 13 cents per hour already being received in the form of cost of living adjustments; (2) a wage increase of 5 cents per hour; and (3) a modification of the vacation agreement.

The report to the President was issued on May 15, 1954, the original date for submission of the report having been extended from time to time by agreement between the parties and with the approval of the National Mediation Board and the President. The report that the Emergency Board filed was supportive of the carriers' position. It recommended the "pattern settlement" and asked both the workers and the railroads to share the cost of health insurance. It also called for the adoption of certain work rule changes that the railroads considered to be important.

The following recommendations were submitted by the Board to the President: (1) A third week of vacation after 15 years of service be made applicable for the year 1954; (2) whenever 1 of the 7 enumerated holidays falls on a workday of the workweek of a regularly assigned hourly rated employee, he shall receive the pro rata rate of his position for that day, monthly rated employees to have their monthly pay increased to include on an annual average the approximate number of holidays that would be expected to fall in the workdays of a workweek; (3) the proposal that work performed on Sunday as a scheduled workday be paid for at time and one-half should be withdrawn; (4) the parties should agree to a program, to be effective as soon as possible, providing hospital, medical, and surgical benefits, the cost to the Carriers and Employees to be on a fifty-fifty basis; (5) the proposal for increased free transportation should be withdrawn. In addition the Board recommended certain other miscellaneous rules changes.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 106, 1953-1954., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

The Emergency Board, appointed by the President was composed of David L. Cole, chairman, Saul Wallen and Dudley E. Whiting, the same board, that was appointed to hold hearings for the Flight Engineers Case on Board #120.

Hearings were begun in Miami, Florida on March 12, 1958 and later continued in New York City on April 3. The main issue involved was the question of crew complement on new aircraft. The pilots contended that the third crew member on certain types of aircraft should be a licensed pilot, not a flight engineer. Other issues involved were pension plans, wages, working hours and travel time.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 121. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1952-1958., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

Emergency Board No. 119 was created under an Executive Order of the President dated August 6, 1957. To the fact-finding board were appointed James J. Healy of Boston, an arbitrator and assistant professor of Industrial Relations at Harvard University's Graduate School of Business Administration; Walter R. Johnson of Arlington, Va; special counsel of the National Association of Attorneys General and former Attorney General of Nebraska, and Benjamin C. Roberts of Brooklyn, N.Y., a lawyer active in mediation and arbitration, Healy was appointed chairman.

On November 21, 1956, the Masters, Mates and Pilots union presented the carriers with their demands, which Included a 35% increase in pay for captains and pilots, a 25 cent per hour increase for mates, deckhands and other crew members (both demands to be retroactive August 1, 1956), double time and one-half for work performed on holidays, differential pay of $1.50 per day for bridge motormen and ferry wheelsmen, and health and welfare Insurance for employees and their families.

The carriers countered by offering the MMP the 1956-1957 "pattern" established In negotiations with the non-operating railroads. This proved to be important in the Board's later decision because the MMP from 1937 through 1953, had bargained jointly with and had agreed to, the same settlements as the non-operating unions. More specifically, the carriers offered a pay increase of 10 cents an hour across-the-board, retroactive to November 1, 1956, with additional 7 cent hourly increases in November of 1957 and 1958, health and welfare benefits or equivalent wage increases of 2.5 cents per hour, and semi-annual cost of living adjustments of 1 cent per hour for each one-half point change in the Consumers' Price Index, in return for a moratorium on contract changes for three years.

Conferences between the General Managers' Association of New York Harbor Railroads and the Masters, Mates and Pilots Organization in December 1956, February 1957 and March 1957 produced no agreement. In March, the services of the National Mediation Board were invoked. Originally intending to strike on July 21 the union postponed its strike deadline at the suggestion of the Mediation Board representative to 12:01 A.M. of August 7.

On August 2 and August 7, with agreement still not in sight, the carriers obtained temporary restraining orders from the Federal Courts to prevent the MMP from striking. These were made unnecessary, however, when the President under Section 10, of the Railway Labor Act on the Mediation Board's report that the situation threatened substantially to interrupt interstate commerce to a degree such as to deprive a section of the country of essential transportation service, created the Emergency Board and halted the strike for sixty days. Nine public hearings and two inspection trips were held by the Emergency Board, the investigation beginning on August 14 and being completed on August 30. With the agreement of both parties, the Board was granted a two week extension in which to make its report.

On September 20, the Board made public its recommendation that settlement be, basically, on the terms offered by the railroads. The Board recommended the 26.5 cents "pattern" settlement of the non-operating railroad unions (10 cents per hour retroactive to November 1, 1956, 7 cents per hour effective November 1, 1958, and 2.5 cents in health and welfare benefits or wages at the option of the MMP,) plus a cost-of-living adjustment of 1 cent an hour for each half point change in the CPI, double pay for designated holidays or 16 cents per day increase in basic wages (again at the choice of the union) and Increases to captains and pilots of $1.00 a day retroactive to December 21, 1956, and 50 cents a day effective November 1, 1957 and November 1, 1958.

The union, however, termed these proposals Inadequate and threatened to strike again at 1 A.M. of October 22, the day after the cooling-off period was to end. Masters, Mates and Pilots' president C.T. Atkins termed the parties still "far apart," and the rank-and-file backed him up by voting affirmatively in the strike vote held October 17. The threatened strike did take place, but lasted for only 90 minutes, as union and management with the aid of Federal Mediator, T.E. Schoonover, reached agreement at 2:30 A.M. on management's terms.

Over the three-year period of the agreement, the settlement meant a daily increase of $4.36 in wages for captains and pilots (in addition to their then current $22.50,) and an increase of $2.36 per day for mates and deckhands (in addition to their respective $16.80 and $16.40,) plus the cost-of-living adjustments which were estimated at an additional 32 cents.

The International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots was the bargaining Agent for 872 of the 3,231 railroad marine service employees then employed in New York Harbor. Although this amounted to only 27% overall, the MMP represented 90.1% of the captains and pilots, 59.1% of the mates and 61.8% of the deckhands.

The eleven railroads represented by the General Managers' Association of New York were the New York Central, the New York, New Haven and Hartford, the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, the New York Dock Railway, the Bush Terminal Railroad, the Baltimore and Delaware, Lackawanna and Western and the Central Railroad Company of New Jersey.

The eleven railroads conduct both ferry and towing operations as extensions of their railroad service. Combined, they handled in 1956 approximately 27 million tons of freight and had an annual gross of approximately $250,000,000, Dally business was estimated at $725,000 and daily-losses in perishable goods, in case of a strike, at $5285,000.

The ferry service of the New York Central, Erie, Delaware, Lackawanna and Western and Jersey Central Railroads handles a total of 69,000 passengers and 4,500 motor vehicles a day, mainly between points in Manhattan and New Jersey.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 119. Transcripts of proceedings and exhibits, 1937-1957., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

On April 19, 1960, the President of the U. S., acting under the authority given to him by the Railway Labor Act, created an Emergency Board to investigate and report on the dispute between the Long Island Rail Road and the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Locals 517 and 1090. The members of the Board were Curtis G. Shake, Chairman, Lloyd H. Bailer, and Edward A. Lynch.

The union's demands on the Long Island Rail Road which brought about the dispute were:

1. Reduction of the six-day week to five days for passenger service trainmen, without a reduction in pay.

2. Reduction of the work week for all men in local freight service to five days a week without loss of pay. The company contended that conductors and brakemen were required seven days a week.

3. Payment of switchtenders at the higher brakemen's rate.

4. Payment of the 95 cent daily allowance to yard trainmen not required to handle air hose for handling air hose.

On May 18, 1960, the Emergency Board found that rates being paid to Long Island trainmen were higher than the standard rates on other Class I carriers. Average annual earnings for Long Island trainmen were $7,965 in 1959 compared with $7,263 on all other Class I carriers.

The Railroad Trainmen then served an official notice on the Long Island Rail Road that they would go on strike at 12:01 A.M., Sunday, June 19.

Two days before the strike was scheduled to begin, W. P. Kennedy, International President of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, ordered locals 517 and 1090 to postpone the strike on an appeal by the National Mediation Board for a resumption of conferences "in the public interest."

Efforts of the National Mediation Board to avert the strike collapsed one week later, which released the trainmen from their no strike pledge and a strike was tentatively set for Sunday, July 10 at 12:01 am. After authorization received from International President Kennedy, July 10 was confirmed as the strike date.

On July 6, Governor Rockefeller took personal charge of efforts to prevent a strike on the Long Island Rail Road. He sent telegrams to company and union executives asking them to meet with George Moskowitz, Chairman of the State Mediation Board. Governor Rockefeller stepped in only after the union had rejected a plea by city, state and county officials for a two week postponement of the strike.

The Governor was able to persuade the railroad to accept a five day work week, but only with the stipulation that the union agree to moves which would help keep the costs at a minimum. The union refused to accept any economy moves and the conference ended without success.

The strike began, as scheduled, on Sunday morning, July 10. The State Public Service Commission immediately authorized all bus companies in Nassau and Suffolk counties and in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens to provide all possible transportation to the strike affected area. The Transport Workers Union supported the trainmen, refusing to work overtime and by not working on extra buses or subway trains in Queens or Long Island.

Industrial Commissioner Martin P. Catherwood then appointed a State Board of Inquiry consisting of the Very Rev. Philip E. Dobson of Fordham University, Peter J. Keulemans of General Bronze Co., and Dean John W. McConnell of Industrial and Labor Relations School at Cornell University. The board was directed to study all factors necessary to guarantee safe and efficient commuter service "with benefit to the economy of the area and at prices the commuting public can afford," and to make recommendations to help end the strike.

The Board of Inquiry proposed an arbitration plan on July 14 which called for a five day week with no cut in pay for the trainmen. Also included was a provision which would leave to final and binding arbitration the issue of how the shorter work week would be paid for. The union refused to accept binding arbitration.

On July 20 the National Mediation Board proposed a plan whereby the BRT would agree to a 2 1/2 cent-an-hour wage cut to help pay for the increased cost of a five day week. This proposal was accepted by the union but the railroad rejected it saying that the increased costs would still necessitate higher fares for passengers. The company again suggested binding arbitration on the method of financing the shorter work week, but the union still refused.

On August 3, 1960, Governor Rockefeller called the disputing parties together for a conference which lasted eleven and one-half hours before an agreement was reached. The three year agreement guaranteed a five day week. The cost of the shortened work week was set at $357,592, of which the company agreed to pay $162,041. The trainmen absorbed the remainder of the cost by agreeing to a 2 1/2 cent-an-hour wage cut and changes in work rules enabling more complete utilization of the existing work force. The union withdrew its demand for a five day week in freight service in return for a total of $53,040 in added compensation. The union won agreement to its other two demands. Yard service men will receive 95 cents per day for coupling air hose and switchtenders will receive extra pay when performing brakemen's duties.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 129. Documents, 1957-1960 [bulk 1960]., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

The Emergency Board was established by Executive Order 10919 of February 17, 1961 as a result of the dispute over the terms of a new contract between the Pan American World Airways, Inc. and the Flight Engineers International Association.

The union submitted proposals for a reduction of flight time hours, increased pay, and additional furlough pay. These demands, which would have necessitated the employment of additional flight engineers at considerable company expense, came at a time when the composition of the cockpit crew was under fire in the airline industry (crew composition controversy). The controversy was one of representation of the flight engineer by either FEIA of ALPA, brought to a head by the National Mediation Board's decision re: United Airlines in favor of unilateral representation by the ALPA (Air Line Pilots Association) . As a result of the aforesaid, a presidential commission was established to Investigate this industry wide controversy.

Emergency Board No. 135 was chaired by G. Allan Dash and had as members Arthur Stark and Edward A. Lynch. The board conducted proceedings from April to June 8, 1961, running concurrently, incidentally, with those of the presidential commission.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 135. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1927-1961., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

On August 30, 1960 the Pilots Association notified TWA that it wished to make certain changes in the existing eon-tract and submitted a new agreement. On September 19, 1960 TWA forwarded its proposals to the union, and served notice that the entire contract was open for negotiation. No agreement was reached, and on December 20, 1960 the assistance of the National Mediation Board was requested. Several attempts to settle the dispute were unsuccessful and the Pilots established November 2 at midnight as the time to strike.

The President, by Executive Order 10971 on November 1, 196l created Emergency Board No. 142 to investigate the dispute. On November 22, he appointed Donald B. Straus, Morrison Handsaker and Patrick J. Fisher to the Board, Issues in dispute were wages, hours, rules, training pro¬grams and fringe benefits. The most serious issue was the implementation of the recommendations of the Presidential Commission which bad recommended that the flight engineers merge with the pilots, that the flight deck crew be reduced from four to three, and certain other airline personnel problems.

From the guide to the United States. Emergency Board No. 142. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961., (Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn United States. Emergency Board No. 135. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1927-1961. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 120. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1952-1958. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 137, 1961. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 137, 1961. Wage and benefits case. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, et al. and Railroad Yardmasters of America, 1937-1961. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 116. Carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Documents, 1956-1957. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 81. Carriers represented by the Eastern, Western and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. Order of Railway Conductors of America and the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen. Documents, 1950. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 81. Transcripts and exhibits, 1950. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 129, 1959. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 129. Wages, assignment of jobs, and hours case. Long Island Railroad Company and Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 1953-1960. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Hill, James C., 1914-. Hill, James C. Papers, 1942-1976. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 137. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1937-1961. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 145, 1961. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 144,1961. Akron and Barberton Belt Railroad and other carriers represented by Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. Eleven Cooperating Railway Labor Organizations, 1949-1962. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 106, 1954. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of Emergency Board No. 106, Chicago Illinois, 1954. Vacations, holidays, health and welfare benefits cases. Fifteen cooperating (non-operating) railway labor organizations vs. designated railroads represented by the Eastern, Western and Southeastern Carriers Conference Committees, 1941-1954. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 116, 1956. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 116, 1956. Wage and benefit case. Akron and Barberton Belt Railroad Company and other carriers represented by the Eastern, Western and southeastern Carriers₀ Conference Committees and the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 1946-1957. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 119. New York Harbor Railroads vs. International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots. Documents, 1956-1957. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board no. 52. United States. Emergency Board no. 52. Files, 1947. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Hill, James C., 1914-. James C. Hill Series 3. National Emergency Boards documents, 1961-1964. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 176. Carriers exhibit ... before Emergency Board No. 176 : the four shop craft unions wage and rules case. Georgia State University
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 121. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1952-1958. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 179. Exhibits, 1971. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 111. Transcripts and exhibits, Emergency Board no. 111, 1955. Wage-rules case. International Brotherhood of Teamsters and Brotherhood of Railway Clerks vs. Railway Express Agency. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 106. United States. Emergency Board No. 106. Akron, Canton and Youngstown Railroad Company and other carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees vs. fifteen cooperating (non-operating) labor unions. Proceedings and exhibits, 1953-1954. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Hill, James C., 1914-. Hill, James C. Papers, 1942-1976. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Boards No. 130 and No. 145. United States. Emergency Boards No. 130 and Nor. 145. Akron and Barberton Belt Railroad Company vs. eleven cooperating railway labor organizations. Documents, 1949-1962, bulk 1960-1962. Cornell University Library
referencedIn United States. Emergency Board No. 125. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1946-1959. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 125. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1946-1959. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 129. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1953-1960. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 118. Transcripts of proceedings and exhibits, 1945-1957. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 98. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1951. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 134. Transcripts of Proceedings, 1961 Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University.
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 142. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
referencedIn Hill, James C., 1914-. James C. Hill Series 3. National Emergency Boards documents, 1961-1964. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 144. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1949-1962. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
referencedIn United States. Emergency Boards No. 130 and No. 145. Documents, 1949-1962, bulk 1960-1962. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 175. Transcripts and exhibits, 1969. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 119, 1957. Transcripts of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 119, 1957. Wages and benefits case. General Managers' Association of New York vs. the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, Inc., 1937-1957. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 118, 1957. Transcripts of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 118, 1957. Wage, benefits and work rules case. Toledo, Lorain and Fairport Dock Company, Toledo Lakefront Dock Company, and Cleveland Stevedore Company vs. United Mine Workers of America, District 50, 1945-1957. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 94. Transcripts and exhibits, Emergency Board No. 94, 1951 : Air Line Pilots Association, International, vs. American Airlines, Inc., 1938-1951. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 178. United States Emergency Board No. 178. Transcripts. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 138. United States. Emergency Board No. 138. Southern Pacific Company (Pacific Lines) vs. Order of Railroad Telegraphers. Proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961, bulk 1961. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 116. Reports and exhibits, 1956-1957. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 138, 1961. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 138, 1961. Southern Pacific Company (Pacific Lines) vs. Order of Railroad Telegraphers, 1950-1961. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 133. Exhibits, 1960. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 111. Transcripts and exhibits, 1955. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 174. Transcripts and exhibits, 1969. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 146, 1962. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 146, 1962. Trans World Airlines vs. the Flight Engineers' International Association, TWA Chapter, 1951-1962. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 135, 1961 . Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 135, 1961. Wages and hours case. Pan American World Airways, Inc. and the Flight engineers International Association, PAA Chapter, 1927-1961. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 124. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1939-1958., 1939-1958. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 129. Documents, 1957-1960 [bulk 1960]. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 138. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University.
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 179. Exhibits and related material of the Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen's case before the President's Emergency Board No. 179. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 142, 1961. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 142, 1961. Trans World Airlines, Inc., vs. the Air Line Pilots Association, International, 1950-1961. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States Emergency Board No. 125, 1959. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 125. Equal pay case. Pan American World Airways, Inc. vs. Transport Workers Union of America, Air Transport Division, 1946-1959. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 121, 1958. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 121, 1958. Wages, hours and crew case. Eastern Air Lines, Inc., vs. the Air Line Pilots Association, International, 1952-1958. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 129. United States. Emergency Board No. 129. Long Island Railroad Company vs. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. Documents, 1957-1960, bulk, 1960. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 120, 1958. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 120, 1958. Wages, benefits and crew size case. Eastern Air Lines Inc., vs. Flight Engineers International Association, EAL Chapter, 1952-1958. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Seward, Ralph T. (Ralph Theodore), 1907-. Ralph T. Seward. Series 5. United States Emergency Board No. 176 files, 1969. Cornell University Library
referencedIn United States. Emergency Boad No. 134. United States Emergency Boad No. 134. Cornell University Library
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creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 81. Exhibits presented to Emergency Board No. 81, appointed by the President of the United States, Chicago, Illinois, 1950. Wage-rules case. Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen, and Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, vs. carriers represented by the Eastern Carriers Conference Committee, the Western Carriers Conference Committee, and the Southeastern Carriers Conference Committee, 1921-1950. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 178. Records. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 98. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, Emergency Board No. 98, 1951. Union shop case. Seventeen cooperating (non-operative) railway labor organizations and 390 carriers, most combined for representation by Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers Conference Committees, 1926-1952. Cornell University Library
referencedIn United States. Emergency Board No. 142. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1950-1961. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 133. United States. Emergency Board No. 133. New York Harbor Carriers' Conference Committee vs. Railroad Marine Harbor Council. Exhibits, 1960. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Seidenberg, Jacob, 1914-. Jacob Seidenberg. Series 3. Proceedings and exhibits of United States Emergency Board Nos. 175 and 178, 1967-1970. Cornell University Library
referencedIn Seidenberg, Jacob, 1914-. Jacob Seidenberg. Series 3. Proceedings and exhibits of United States Emergency Board Nos. 175 and 178, 1967-1970. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 94. Transcripts and exhibits, 1951. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 124, 1958. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits of the Emergency Board No. 124, 1958. Arbitrability, wages and crew case. American Airlines, Inc. vs. Air Line Pilots Association, International, 1939-1958. Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 146. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1951-1962. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 135. Transcript of proceedings and exhibits, 1927-1961. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 119. Transcripts of proceedings and exhibits, 1937-1957. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
creatorOf United States. Emergency Board No. 106, 1953-1954. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Direct Relationships
Relation Name
associatedWith Air Line Pilots Association, International. corporateBody
associatedWith Akron and Barberton Belt Railroad Company corporateBody
associatedWith American Airlines, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company corporateBody
associatedWith Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen. corporateBody
associatedWith Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. corporateBody
associatedWith Brotherhood of Railway Clerks. corporateBody
associatedWith Cole, David L. 1902-1978. person
associatedWith Eastern Air Lines, Inc. corporateBody
associatedWith Eastern Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Eastern Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Eastern Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Eastern Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Eastern Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Flight Engineers' International Association corporateBody
associatedWith General Managers' Association of New York Harbor Railroads. corporateBody
associatedWith Hill, James C., 1914- person
associatedWith International Brotherhood of Teamsters. corporateBody
associatedWith International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of America. corporateBody
associatedWith International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots. corporateBody
associatedWith Long Island Railroad Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Long Island Railroad Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Long Island Railroad Company. corporateBody
associatedWith New York Harbor Carriers' Conference. corporateBody
associatedWith Order of Railroad Telegraphers (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen. corporateBody
associatedWith Order of Railway Conductors of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Pan American World Airways. corporateBody
associatedWith Pan American World Airways. corporateBody
associatedWith Railroad Marine Harbor Council (New York, N.Y.) corporateBody
associatedWith Railroad Yardmasters of America corporateBody
associatedWith Railway Express Agency. corporateBody
associatedWith Seidenberg, Jacob, 1914- person
associatedWith Seward, Ralph T. (Ralph Theodore), 1907- person
associatedWith Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Southern Pacific Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Transport Workers Union of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Trans World Airlines corporateBody
associatedWith United Mine Workers of America. District 50. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Emergency Boad No. 134. corporateBody
associatedWith United States Emergency Board No. 125, 1959. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. Emergency Boards No. 130 and No. 145. corporateBody
associatedWith United States. National Mediation Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Western Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Western Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Western Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Western Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Western Carriers' Conference Committee. corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
United States
New York (N.Y.)
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
New York (State)
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
United States
Subject
Collective bargaining--Railroads--United States--Sources
Railroads--Employees--Labor unions--Sources
Wages and labor productivity--United States
Mediation and conciliation, Industrial--Sources
Arbitration, Industrial--United States--Sources
Mediation and conciliation, Industrial--United States--Cases
Technological unemployment
Railroad conductors
Telegraphers
Collective bargaining--Aeronautics--United States--Sources
Railroad trainmen
Mediation and conciliation, Industrial--Cases
Strikes and lockouts--Railroads
Train ferries--New York (State)--New York
Mediation and conciliation, Industrial--United States--Sources
Train ferries--Employees
Collective bargaining--Railroads
Wages and labor productivity
Collective bargaining--Railroads--United States--History--Sources
Collective bargaining--Aeronautics--Sources
Ferry men
Railroads--United States--Finance
Open and closed shop
Merchant mariners--Labor unions
Open and closed shop--United States
Arbitration , Industrial--Railroads--Sources
Arbitration, Industrial--Railroads
Mediation and conciliation, Industrial--New York (State)--Cases
Arbitration, Industrial--Sources
Airlines--Employees--Labor unions--Sources
Train ferries
Railroads--Employees--Labor unions--United States--Sources
Railroads--Finance
Mediation and conciliation, Industrial--United States
Airlines--Employees--Labor unions--United States--Sources
Collective bargaining--Railroads--United States
Railroads--Employees
Occupation
Function
Railroad conductors

Corporate Body

Active 1956

Active 1957

Information

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