Waters, Frank, 1902-1995

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Frank Waters, writer and editor, was born July 25, 1902, at the foot of Pike's Peak, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His father, who was part Cherokee died when Frank was 12 years old. It was his father who initially sparked Frank's interest in Indian culture. Waters attended Colorado College (Colorado Springs) from 1922-25 as an engineering student. He dropped out after his third year to take a job as a laborer in the Salt Creek, Wyoming oil fields. He later worked as an engineer for the Southern California Telephone Company on the Mexican border. Waters moved back to Colorado in 1935 to work on the second two volumes of his Colorado mining trilogy. He moved to New Mexico's Mora Valley in 1937, and relocated to Taos in 1938. When World War II broke out, he worked for the office of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., as a chief content officer and propaganda analyst. After the War, Waters returned to New Mexico and bought his home in Arroyo Seco. He was editor of El Crepusculo, a weekly Spanish-English newspaper (1949-1951); and book reviewer for the Saturday Review of Literature (1950-1956). Waters also held positions as information consultant for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico, and for the City of Las Vegas, Nevada, (1952-1956). He held a variety of other jobs, including writer for C.O. Whitney Motion Picture Co., Los Angeles (1957), writer-in-residence, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (1966); and director, New Mexico Arts Commission, Santa Fe, (1966-68). Waters' first publication was a short story called, "How It Was Settled," published in 1916. He began publishing in earnest in the 1930s. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 25 books and numerous articles and short works. Thematically, many of his publications relate to the Southwest and Native American culture. Mayan cosmology, atomic physics, and taoism are other topics evident in Waters' works. Waters' style distinguishes between the popular Western and the novel of the Southwest. His revealing, stark descriptions of the Southwestern landscape and the story of human adaptation to the environment has turned People of the Valley and The Man Who Killed the Deer into classics. In addition to his popular and successful publications, Waters' historical novel, River Lady has been produced as a film (Universal International.) Articles by Waters have appeared in numerous periodicals and publications. Foreign translations are in languages including French and German. Frank Waters died in New Mexico on June 3, 1995 at the age of 92.

From the description of Frank Waters correspondence and contracts, 1935-1983, 1961-1980. (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 632307988

Frank Waters (1902-1995) authored 27 books, including novels, biographies, and historical works, many of which were influenced by his interest in Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo, and pre-Columbian cultures. In 1970, he was awarded a Rockefeller Foundation grant to study Toltec, Aztec, and Mayan religion and culture in Mexico and Guatemala. This research led to the publication of his Mexico Mystique: the Coming Sixth World of Consciousness (1974). In 1982, he was awarded an NEA grant to further his research in Peru and Bolivia.

From the guide to the Frank Waters Correspondence (MS 163), 1967-1972, (University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. Special Collections Dept.)

Frank Waters, writer and editor, was born July 25, 1902, at the foot of Pike's Peak, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His father, who was part Cherokee died when Frank was 12 years old. It was his father who initially sparked Frank's interest in Indian culture. Waters attended Colorado College (Colorado Springs) from 1922-25 as an engineering student. He dropped out after his third year to take a job as a laborer in the Salt Creek, Wyoming oil fields. He later worked as an engineer for the Southern California Telephone Company on the Mexican border. Waters moved back to Colorado in 1935 to work on the second two volumes of his Colorado mining trilogy. He moved to New Mexico's Mora Valley in 1937, and relocated to Taos in 1938. When World War II broke out, he worked for the office of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., as a chief content officer and propaganda analyst. After the War, Waters returned to New Mexico and bought his home in Arroyo Seco. He was editor of El Crepusculo, a weekly Spanish-English newspaper (1949-1951); and book reviewer for the Saturday Review of Literature (1950-1956). Waters also held positions as information consultant for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico, and for the City of Las Vegas, Nevada, (1952-1956). He held a variety of other jobs, including writer for C.O. Whitney Motion Picture Co., Los Angeles (1957), writer-in-residence, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (1966); and director, New Mexico Arts Commission, Santa Fe, (1966-68). Waters' first publication was a short story called, "How It Was Settled," published in 1916. He began publishing in earnest in the 1930s. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 25 books and numerous articles and short works. Thematically, many of his publications relate to the Southwest and Native American culture. Mayan cosmology, atomic physics, and taoism are other topics evident in Waters' works. Waters' style distinguishes between the popular Western and the novel of the Southwest. His revealing, stark descriptions of the Southwestern landscape and the story of human adaptation to the environment has turned People of the Valley and The Man Who Killed the Deer into classics. In addition to his popular and successful publications, Waters' historical novel, River Lady has been produced as a film (Universal International.) Articles by Waters have appeared in numerous periodicals and publications. Foreign translations are in languages including French and German. Frank Waters died in New Mexico on June 3,1995 at the age of 92.

From the description of Papers, 1892-1992. (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 38463918

From the guide to the Frank Waters Pictorial Collection, 1870-2002

Video interviews recorded with Southwest author Frank Waters. These interviews were taped September 14-17, 1989, at the author's home located in Arroyo Seco, near Taos, New Mexico. The project was funded by the Bay Foundation, New York, NY and was produced by Vineyard Video Productions with the intention of producing a documentary on Frank Waters. The interviews were conducted by Dr. Charles L. Adams, Professor of English at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Robert Potts of Vineyard Video Productions. Dr. Charles Adams is also the director of The Frank Waters Society, and editor of Studies in Frank Waters. The documentary was never made and the videotapes still contain only raw, unedited footage.

From the guide to the Oral History Interviews with Frank Waters, 1989, September 14-17, (University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research.)

Frank Waters, writer and editor, was born 1902 in Colorado Springs, Colo. After World War II he moved to Taos, N.M. Waters' writing style distinguishes between the popular Western and the novel of the Southwest. His works are characterized by revealing, stark descriptions of the Southwestern landscape and the story of man's adaptation to the environment.

From the description of Oral history interviews with Frank Waters, 1989 September 14-17. (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 38759992

Biographical note: Author of novels, biographies and histories; Frank Waters lived and worked in the Southwest throughout his life.

From the description of Tombstone Travestry manuscript draft, ca. 1960-1960. (Arizona Historical Society, Southern Arizona Division). WorldCat record id: 621509290

Frank Waters. Part of the Etta Blum Pictorial Collection (PICT 000-376-0001-0004).

Frank Waters, writer and editor, was born July 25, 1902, at the foot of Pike's Peak, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His father, who was part Cherokee died when Frank was 12 years old. It was his father who initially sparked Frank's interest in Indian culture.

Waters attended Colorado College (Colorado Springs) from 1922-25 as an engineering student. He dropped out after his third year to take a job as a laborer in the Salt Creek, Wyoming oil fields. He later worked as an engineer for the Southern California Telephone Company on the Mexican border. Waters moved back to Colorado in 1935 to work on the second two volumes of his Colorado mining trilogy. He moved to New Mexico's Mora Valley in 1937, and relocated to Taos in 1938. When World War II broke out, he worked for the office of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., as a chief content officer and propaganda analyst. After the War, Waters returned to New Mexico and bought his home in Arroyo Seco. He was editor of El Crepusculo, a weekly Spanish-English newspaper (1949-1951); and book reviewer for the Saturday Review of Literature (1950-1956). Waters also held positions as information consultant for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico, and for the City of Las Vegas, Nevada, (1952-1956). He held a variety of other jobs, including writer for C.O. Whitney Motion Picture Co., Los Angeles (1957), writer-in-residence, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (1966); and director, New Mexico Arts Commission, Santa Fe, (1966-68).

Waters' first publication was a short story called, "How It Was Settled," published in 1916. He began publishing in earnest in the 1930s. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 25 books and numerous articles and short works. Thematically, many of his publications relate to the Southwest and Native American culture. Mayan cosmology, atomic physics, and taoism are other topics evident in Waters' works. Waters' style distinguishes between the popular Western and the novel of the Southwest. His revealing, stark descriptions of the Southwestern landscape and the story of human adaptation to the environment has turned People of the Valley and The Man Who Killed the Deer into classics. In addition to his popular and successful publications, Waters' historical novel, River Lady has been produced as a film (Universal International.) Articles by Waters have appeared in numerous periodicals and publications. Foreign translations are in languages including French and German.

Frank Waters died in New Mexico on June 3, 1995 at the age of 92.

From the guide to the Frank Waters Correspondence and Contracts, 1935-1983, 1961-1980, (University of New Mexico Center for Southwest Research)

Frank Waters. Part of the Etta Blum Pictorial Collection (PICT 000-376-0001-0004).

Frank Waters, writer and editor, was born July 25, 1902, at the foot of Pike's Peak, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His father, who was part Cherokee died when Frank was 12 years old. It was his father who initially sparked Frank's interest in Indian culture.

Waters attended Colorado College (Colorado Springs) from 1922-25 as an engineering student. He dropped out after his third year to take a job as a laborer in the Salt Creek, Wyoming oil fields. He later worked as an engineer for the Southern California Telephone Company on the Mexican border. Waters moved back to Colorado in 1935 to work on the second two volumes of his Colorado mining trilogy. He moved to New Mexico's Mora Valley in 1937, and relocated to Taos in 1938. When World War II broke out, he worked for the office of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., as a chief content officer and propaganda analyst. After the War, Waters returned to New Mexico and bought his home in Arroyo Seco. He was editor of El Crepusculo, a weekly Spanish-English newspaper (1949-1951); and book reviewer for the Saturday Review of Literature (1950-1956). Waters also held positions as information consultant for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico, and for the City of Las Vegas, Nevada, (1952-1956). He held a variety of other jobs, including writer for C.O. Whitney Motion Picture Co., Los Angeles (1957), writer-in-residence, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (1966); and director, New Mexico Arts Commission, Santa Fe, (1966-68).

Waters' first publication was a short story called, "How It Was Settled," published in 1916. He began publishing in earnest in the 1930s. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 25 books and numerous articles and short works. Thematically, many of his publications relate to the Southwest and Native American culture. Mayan cosmology, atomic physics, and taoism are other topics evident in Waters' works. Waters' style distinguishes between the popular Western and the novel of the Southwest. His revealing, stark descriptions of the Southwestern landscape and the story of human adaptation to the environment has turned People of the Valley and The Man Who Killed the Deer into classics. In addition to his popular and successful publications, Waters' historical novel, River Lady has been produced as a film (Universal International.) Articles by Waters have appeared in numerous periodicals and publications. Foreign translations are in languages including French and German.

Frank Waters died in New Mexico on June 3,1995 at the age of 92.

From the guide to the Frank Waters Papers, 1892-1992, (University Libraries, Center for Southwest Research.)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn Dorothy Brett Papers, 1939-1986 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn Adams, Charles L. Charles L. Adams papers, 1946-2002. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Bertha Dutton letters 1962 Museum of New Mexico Library
referencedIn Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Frank Waters Pictorial Collection [Picture] University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Oral History Interviews with Frank Waters, 1989, September 14-17 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn David Dunaway Writing the Southwest research and recordings, 1976-2005 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn Cynthia Farah Writers of the Southwest Photograph Collection, 1980-1988 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
creatorOf Johnson, Walter Willard, 1897-1968. Spud Johnson Papers, 1896-1973 (bulk 1920-1968). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Gilpin, Laura. Brett, Dorothy (Collection) [Picture]. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Milton, John R., 1924-1995. Papers, 1955-1986. Augustana University, Mikkelsen Library
creatorOf Frank Waters Pictorial Collection, 1870-2002
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Writers at Work videotapes, 1978-1979. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Frank Waters Correspondence (MS 163), 1967-1972 University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. Special Collections Dept.
referencedIn Brandi, John. John Brandi papers, 1964-1999. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Smith, Gary M., 1943-. Gary Smith papers, 1960-1984. Utah State University, Merrill-Cazier Library
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Frank Waters Pictorial Collection [Picture] University of New Mexico-Main Campus
referencedIn Witter Bynner papers, 1829-1965. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Ann Merrill correspondence from Frank Waters, 1965-2012, 1966-1979 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Papers, 1892-1992. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Sinclair, John L., 1902-. John L. Sinclair papers, 1849-1990. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
referencedIn Writers at Work Videotapes, 1978-1979 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn Dorothy Brett Pictorial Collection, 1880-1970 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
creatorOf Frank Waters Papers, 1892-1992 University Libraries, Center for Southwest Research.
referencedIn Etta Blum Photograph Collection, 1980 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn Brett, Dorothy, 1883-1977. Dorothy Brett letters to Mark Lutz, Taos, New Mexico, 1957-1965. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Frank Waters correspondence and contracts, 1935-1983, 1961-1980. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
referencedIn Blum, Etta. Etta Blum photograph collection [Picture] University of New Mexico-Main Campus
referencedIn Brett, Dorothy, 1883-1977. Dorothy Brett letters to Mark Lutz, Taos, New Mexico, 1957-1965. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Brett, Dorothy, 1883-1977. Dorothy Brett Collection, 1898-1968. Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Brett, Dorothy, 1883-1977. Papers, 1923-1986. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Midas of the Rockies, [193-?]. Pikes Peak Library District
referencedIn Sprague, Marshall. Papers, 1825-1994 (bulk 1930s-1980s). Pikes Peak Library District
referencedIn Blackburn, Alexander. Alexander Blackburn papers, 1880-1998. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
referencedIn Bertha Dutton Letters, 1962
referencedIn Gary Smith Papers, 1960-1984 Utah State University.Manuscript Collections
referencedIn Dunaway, David King. David Dunaway Writing the Southwest research and recordings, 1976-2005. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-. Tombstone Travestry manuscript draft, ca. 1960-1960. Arizona Historical Society, Southern Arizona Division
referencedIn John L. Sinclair Papers, 1849-1993 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
referencedIn Dorothy Brett Collection TXRC98-A13., 1898-1968 Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Spud Johnson Papers TXRC00-A8., 1896-1973, (bulk 1920-1968) Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Charles L. Adams papers, 1946-2002 Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Frank Waters Correspondence and Contracts, 1935-1983, 1961-1980 University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995,. Oral history interviews with Frank Waters, 1989 September 14-17. University of New Mexico-Main Campus
creatorOf Waters, Frank, 1902-1995. Correspondence file, 1929, from Horace Liveright, Inc. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Adams, Charles L. person
associatedWith Adams, Charles L. person
associatedWith Adams, Charles L., person
associatedWith Bay Foundation. corporateBody
associatedWith Blackburn, Alexander. person
associatedWith Blum, Etta. person
correspondedWith Brandi, John. person
associatedWith Brett, Dorothy, 1883-1977 person
correspondedWith Bynner, Witter, 1881-1968 person
correspondedWith Daves, Joan person
associatedWith Dunaway, David King. person
associatedWith Earp, Alvira Packingham Sullivan, 1847-1947. person
associatedWith Earp family. family
associatedWith Earp, Wyatt, 1848-1929. person
associatedWith Farah, Cynthia, 1949- person
associatedWith Feshin, Nikolaĭ Ivanovich, 1881-1955. person
associatedWith Hispanic Americans person
associatedWith Indians of North America person
associatedWith Johnson, Walter Willard, 1897-1968 person
associatedWith Luhan, Mabel Dodge, 1879-1962. person
associatedWith Manby, Arthur Rochford, 1859?-1929? person
correspondedWith Merrill, Ann person
associatedWith Milton, John R., 1924-1995. person
associatedWith Potts, Robert person
associatedWith Potts, Robert, person
associatedWith Pueblos person
associatedWith Sinclair, John L., 1902- person
associatedWith Smith, Gary M., 1943- person
associatedWith Sprague, Marshall. person
associatedWith Stratton, Winfield Scott, 1848-1902. person
associatedWith Stratton, Winnfield Scott person
associatedWith Swallow Press. corporateBody
associatedWith Tolbert, Mildred. person
associatedWith University of New Mexico. Dept. of English corporateBody
associatedWith Vineyard Video Productions. corporateBody
associatedWith Warner, Edith, 1893-1951. person
associatedWith Waters, Frank, 1902- person
Place Name Admin Code Country
North America
Colorado
Southwest, New
New Mexico
Colorado
United States
New Mexico
Colorado
New Mexico
Colorado
New Mexico--Taos
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
Colorado--Cripple Creek
West (U.S.)
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
Southwest, New
Taos (N.M.)
Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico)
Southwest, New
Taos (N.M.)
New Mexico
Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico)
West (U.S.)
Subject
Authors, American--20th century--Interviews
Indians of North America--Rites and ceremonies
Authors and publishers
Zuni Indians
Oral History
Hispanic Americans--Subsistence activities--1940-1959
Navajo Indians
Artists--New Mexico--Taos
Authors, American--20th century--Correspondence
Agriculture--1940-1959
Authors--1950-1975
Artists
Hopi Indians
Pueblo Indians
Gold mines and mining
Gold mines and mining--Colorado
Pueblos--1900-1975
Indians of North America--Arts and crafts--1900-1975
Authors, American--20th century
Indian mythology--North America
Southwest, New--In literature
Indian mythology
Pueblo Indians--1890-1975
Indians of North America--Religion
National parks and reserves
New Mexico--In literature
Agriculture--New Mexico
Mining--1870-1975
Authors, American--New Mexico--20th Century
Navajo Indians--1900-1975
Authors
Indians of North America--Education--1900-1909
Zuni Indians--1900-1975
National parks and reserves--1950-1975
Authors and publishers--United States
Occupation
Indian art--North America
Writer, Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction
Function

Person

Birth 1902-07-25

Death 1995-06-03

Americans

German,

English,

French

Information

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