Young, Stephen M. (Stephen Marvin), 1889-1984

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Stephen Marvin Young (b. May 4, 1889, Huron County, Ohio-d. Dec. 1, 1984, Washington, D.C.), U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from Ohio, graduated from Western Reserve University law school and was a member of the Ohio State House of Representatives. He served in the U.S. Army on the Mexican border and during the First World War. He was elected to the 77th Congress, serving from 1941 to 1943, and during World War II was an officer in the U.S. Army, serving in North Africa and Italy, discharged as a lieutenant colonel in 1946. He was elected again to the 81st Congress, serving from 1949 to 1951, and to the Senate in 1958, serving from 1959 to 1971.

From the description of Young, Stephen M. (Stephen Marvin), 1889-1984 (U.S. National Archives and Records Administration). naId: 10574497

Ohio lawyer and politician who served as U.S. Senator from 1958 to 1971. Young's views on the Cold War and the Vietnam Conflict often went against mainstream opinion.

From the description of Papers, 1916-1971, bulk 1958-1971. (Rhinelander District Library). WorldCat record id: 17382960

Stephen Marvin Young (1889-1984) was raised in Norwalk, Ohio on the farm of his parents, Stephen M. and Belle M. (Wagner) Young. His father was a judge in Huron County. After attending Norwalk High School, Young studied at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. He later transferred to Adelbert College of Western Reserve University and subsequently entered the Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law at Western Reserve University. In 1911, he received his LL.B. Degree and was admitted to the Ohio Bar.

As a young attorney, he developed an interest in public service and served two terms in the Ohio General Assembly, first in 1913 and again in 1915. He then served as assistant prosecuting attorney of Cuyahoga County (1917-1919) and as chief criminal prosecuting attorney (1919-1920). In 1922, he became the Democratic nominee for Attorney General and in 1930 and 1936 was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination. As a member of the Ohio Commission on Unemployment Insurance (1931-1932), he championed unemployment insurance and worker's compensation.

First elected as Ohio's United States Representative-at-Large in 1932, Young was reelected by his constituents in 1934 and 1940. When the United States entered World War II, Young, who served in the field artillery during World War I, again chose active duty rather than a home front position. In 1945, he became Allied Military Governor of the Province of Reggio Emilia in Italy. Among the decorations and honors he received for his military service were the Bronze Star, four battle stars, the order of the Crown of Italy, and the personal commendation of General Mark W. Clark.

After further service in the Eighty-first Congress in 1948, and as President of both the Cuyahoga County Bar Association and the War Veterans Bar Association, Young left a lucrative law practice to seek office as a United States Senator. In the fierce campaign of 1958, he defeated John W. Bricker, a veteran of thirteen years in the Senate. Among those instrumental in waging a successful campaign was Harry S. Truman who toured Ohio on Young's behalf. The "Right to Work" issue which Young opposed and his opponent favored was an important factor in his campaign. In 1964, at the age of seventy-four, he once gain waged a successful campaign, defeating Robert Taft, Jr. In this year the Johnson landslide was instrumental in his victory.

Throughout his Senatorial career, Young served on three major Committees: Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Armed Services, and Public Works. His outspoken views, particularly on the subject of the "immoral and undeclared war in Viet Nam," has been the subject of much controversy. His highly volatile responses to constituents whose letters were either abusive or offensive have also been a well-publicized aspect of his career.

Stephen M. Young married Ruby Louise Dawley on January 18, 1911. They had two sons, Stephen M. Young, Jr. and Richard Dawley Young, and one daughter, Marjorie L. (Mrs. Robert R. Richardson). Ruby Young died in October 1952, and on March 28, 1957 Stephen Young married Rachel Louise Bell.

From the guide to the Stephen M. Young Photographs, 1950-1970, (Western Reserve Historical Society)

Stephen Marvin Young (1889-1984) was raised in Norwalk, Ohio, on the farm of his parents, Stephen M. and Belle M. (Wagner) Young. His father was a judge in Huron County. After attending Norwalk High School, Young studied at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. He later transferred to Adelbert College of Western Reserve University and subsequently entered the Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law at Western Reserve University. In 1911, he received his LL.B. Degree and was admitted to the Ohio Bar.

As a young attorney, he developed an interest in public service and served two terms in the Ohio General Assembly, first in 1913 and again in 1915. He then served as assistant prosecuting attorney of Cuyahoga County (1917-1919) and as chief criminal prosecuting attorney (1919-1920). In 1922, he became the Democratic nominee for Attorney General and in 1930 and 1936 was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination. As a member of the Ohio Commission on Unemployment Insurance (1931-1932), he championed unemployment insurance and worker's compensation.

First elected as Ohio's United States Representative-at-Large in 1932, Young was reelected by his constituents in 1934 and 1940. When the United States entered World War II, Young, who served in the field artillery during World War I, again chose active duty rather than a home front position. In 1945, he became Allied Military Governor of the Province of Reggio Emilia in Italy. Among the decorations and honors he received for his military service were the Bronze Star, four battle stars, the order of the Crown of Italy, and the personal commendation of General Mark W. Clark.

After further service in the Eighty-first Congress in 1948, and as President of both the Cuyahoga County Bar Association and the War Veterans Bar Association, Young left a lucrative law practice to seek office as a United States Senator. In the fierce campaign of 1958, he defeated John W. Bricker, a veteran of thirteen years in the Senate. Among those instrumental in waging a successful campaign was Harry S. Truman who toured Ohio on Young's behalf. The "Right to Work" issue which Young opposed and his opponent favored was an important factor in his campaign. In 1964, at the age of seventy-four, he once gain waged a successful campaign, defeating Robert Taft, Jr. In this year the Johnson landslide was instrumental in his victory.

Throughout his Senatorial career, Young served on three major Committees: Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Armed Services, and Public Works. His outspoken views, particularly on the subject of the "immoral and undeclared war in Viet Nam," has been the subject of much controversy. His highly volatile responses to constituents whose letters were either abusive or offensive have also been a well-publicized aspect of his career.

Stephen M. Young married Ruby Louise Dawley on January 18, 1911. They had two sons, Stephen M. Young, Jr. and Richard Dawley Young, and one daughter, Marjorie L. (Mrs. Robert R. Richardson). Ruby Young died in October 1952, and on March 28, 1957 Stephen Young married Rachel Louise Bell.

From the guide to the Stephen M. Young Papers, Series II, 1943-1945, (Western Reserve Historical Society)

Stephen Marvin Young (1889-1984) was raised in Norwalk, Ohio on the farm of his parents, Stephen M. and Belle M. (Wagner) Young. His father was a judge in Huron County. After attending Norwalk High School, Young studied at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. He later transferred to Adelbert College of Western Reserve University and subsequently entered the Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law at Western Reserve University. In 1911, he received his LL.B. Degree and was admitted to the Ohio Bar.

As a young attorney, he developed an interest in public service and served two terms in the Ohio General Assembly, first in 1913 and again in 1915. He then served as assistant prosecuting attorney of Cuyahoga County (1917-1919) and as chief criminal prosecuting attorney (1919-1920). In 1922, he became the Democratic nominee for Attorney General and in 1930 and 1936 was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination. As a member of the Ohio Commission on Unemployment Insurance (1931-1932), he championed unemployment insurance and worker's compensation.

First elected as Ohio's United States Representative-at-Large in 1932, Young was reelected by his constituents in 1934 and 1940. When the United States entered World War II, Young, who served in the field artillery during World War I, again chose active duty rather than a home front position. In 1945, he became Allied Military Governor of the Province of Reggio Emilia in Italy. Among the decorations and honors he received for his military service were the Bronze Star, four battle stars, the order of the Crown of Italy, and the personal commendation of General Mark W. Clark.

After further service in the Eighty-first Congress in 1948, and as President of both the Cuyahoga County Bar Association and the War Veterans Bar Association, Young left a lucrative law practice to seek office as a United States Senator. In the fierce campaign of 1958, he defeated John W. Bricker, a veteran of thirteen years in the Senate. Among those instrumental in waging a successful campaign was Harry S. Truman who toured Ohio on Young's behalf. The "Right to Work" issue which Young opposed and his opponent favored was an important factor in his campaign. In 1964, at the age of seventy-four, he once gain waged a successful campaign, defeating Robert Taft, Jr. In this year the Johnson landslide was instrumental in his victory.

Throughout his Senatorial career, Young served on three major Committees: Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Armed Services, and Public Works. His outspoken views, particularly on the subject of the "immoral and undeclared war in Viet Nam," has been the subject of much controversy. His highly volatile responses to constituents whose letters were either abusive or offensive have also been a well-publicized aspect of his career.

Stephen M. Young married Ruby Louise Dawley on January 18, 1911. They had two sons, Stephen M. Young, Jr. and Richard Dawley Young, and one daughter, Marjorie L. (Mrs. Robert R. Richardson). Ruby Young died in October 1952, and on March 28, 1957 Stephen Young married Rachel Louise Bell.

From the guide to the Stephen M. Young Papers, 1916-1970, 1958-1970, (Western Reserve Historical Society)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn LBJ Recording of Telephone Conversation, WH Series, Speaker: WAYNE HAYS, Time: 7:05P Lyndon Baines Johnson Library
referencedIn Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations. 1900 - 2003. Moving Images Relating to Military Aviation Activities. 1947 - 1984. WORLD CONGRESS OF FLIGHT, LAS VEGAS, NELLIS AFB, MCCARRON FIELD AND INDIAN SPRINGS, NEVADA, 11 - 14 APRIL 1959 National Archives at College Park
referencedIn Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations. 1900 - 2003. Moving Images Relating to Military Aviation Activities. 1947 - 1984. CONGRESSIONAL TOUR, ANDERSEN AFB, GUAM
creatorOf Osborn, Stellanova, 1894-1988. Stellanova Osborn papers, 1916-1992. University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library
referencedIn John Shirley Wood Papers, 1917-1967 Syracuse University. Library. Special Collections Research Center
creatorOf Stephen M. Young Papers, 1916-1970, 1958-1970 Western Reserve Historical Society
creatorOf Celebrezze, Anthony J. (Anthony Joseph), 1910-1998. Papers. Series II, 1933-1977. Western Reserve Historical Society, Research Library
referencedIn Records of the Women's Equity Action League, 1966-1979 Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Allen, Florence Ellinwood, 1884-1966. Papers, 1856-1967, bulk 1901-1967. Western Reserve Historical Society, Research Library
creatorOf Simon, Ralph. Papers. Ohio History Connection, Ohio Historical Society
creatorOf Stephen M. Young Photographs, 1950-1970 Western Reserve Historical Society
creatorOf Stephen M. Young Papers, Series II, 1943-1945 Western Reserve Historical Society
creatorOf Young, Stephen M. (Stephen Marvin), 1890-. Papers, 1916-1971, bulk 1958-1971. Western Reserve Historical Society, Research Library
creatorOf Rupp, Allen Eugene, 1901-. L. To Senator Stephen M. Young, Washington, D.C. Marietta College Library
referencedIn Stellanova Osborn papers, 1907-1988 Bentley Historica Library University of Michigan
creatorOf Young, Stephen M. (Stephen Marvin), 1889-1984. Stephen M. Young : commercials , 1964. University of Oklahoma, Political Community Archives
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Allen, Florence Ellinwood, 1884-1966. person
associatedWith Celebrezze, Anthony J. (Anthony Joseph), 1910-1998. person
associatedWith Osborn, Stellanova, 1894-1988. person
associatedWith Rupp, Allen Eugene, 1901- person
associatedWith Simon, Ralph. person
associatedWith University of Oklahoma. Political Commercial Archive. corporateBody
associatedWith Walker, Edwin. person
associatedWith Wetterman, Neil. person
correspondedWith Women's Equity Action League corporateBody
associatedWith Wood, John Shirley, 1888-1966 person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Soviet Union
United States
Subject
Television advertising
Vietnam War, 1961-1975
Legislators
United States--Politics and government--1945-
Wetterman, Neil
Young, Stephen M. (Stephen Marvin), 1889-1984
United States--Officials and employees--Photographs
Advertising, political
United States--Foreign relations--Soviet Union
Walker, Edwin
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--United States
Legislators--United States--Photographs
Soviet Union--Foreign relations--United States
Young, Stephen M. (Stephen Marvin), 1889-1984--Photograph collections
World War, 1939-1945--Personal narratives, American
United States--Army--History--World War, 1939-1945
Legislators--United States
Occupation
Activity

Person

Birth 1889-05-04

Death 1984-12-01

English

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