Wasserman, Jeanne L.

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Art collectors; Boston, Mass. Jeanne (1915- ) was a curator; Max (1913-1986), a businessman.

The 180 Beacon St. Collection of Contemporary Art was assembled in the 1960s by the Wassermans, with the advice of a committee consisting of Dorothy Miller of the Museum of Modern Art, H. Harvard Arnason of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, curator Sam Hunter, and Jeanne Wasserman, for the 17-storey apartment building built by the Wasserman Development Corporation. The committee's selections were primarily works by living artists done from the late fifties; slightly more than half were American. In 1975, the Development Corp. went bankrupt and the approximately 160 art objects were dispersed, chiefly at auctions. The Wasserman's personal art collection consisted of work by many of the same artists and included as well large-scale outdoor sculpture.

From the description of Jeanne and Max Wasserman papers, [ca. 1960-1975]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 78272026

Jeanne Wasserman (nee Leonard) was born March 19, 1915 in New York City, later moving to New Rochelle, New York. Mrs. Wasserman's family, of German-Jewish descent, immigrated to the United States in the pre-Civil War era. Wasserman's grandfather was a successful businessman, who later paid for Jeanne's private high school and later, her college education at Radcliffe, which culminated in a degree in English literature in 1936.

In 1962, Mrs. Wasserman came to the Fogg Art Museum as a research assistant to then director, John Coolidge. In 1969, she was named the Honorary Curator of 19th- and 20th-Century Sculpture, a position she held for almost 2 decades. While at the Fogg, Mrs. Wasserman was in charge of a number of renowned exhibitions, including "Daumier Sculpture: A Critical and Comparative Study," for which she also authored a book with the same title.

From the description of Papers of Fogg Art Museum Honorary Curator of Sculpture 1960-c.1987 (Harvard University Art Museum). WorldCat record id: 689542450

Jeanne Wasserman (née Leonard) was born March 19, 1915 in New York City, later moving to New Rochelle, New York. Her family, of German-Jewish descent, immigrated to the United States in the pre-Civil War era. Wasserman's grandfather was a successful businessman, who paid for Jeanne's private high school and later, her college education at Radcliffe College, which culminated in a degree in English literature in 1936.

Ms. Wasserman met her husband, Max Wasserman, on a blind date, shortly before her graduation from Radcliffe. The two married in 1938, once Jeanne was convinced Max could support her. The Wassermans had three children, Peter, Suzanne, and Nancy. Ms. Wasserman began her career doing the advertising for her husband's business, Wasco Flashing. When he sold the business in the 1950's to work in real estate, Ms. Wasserman began working in the art field.

Having taken classes at the Fogg Art Museum while she was at Radcliffe, Ms. Wasserman was eager to return, and did so in 1962, as a research assistant to then director, John Coolidge. In 1969, she was named the Honorary Curator of 19th- and 20th-Century Sculpture, a position she held for about 2 decades. While at the Fogg, Ms. Wasserman was in charge of a number of renowned exhibitions, including "Daumier Sculpture: A Critical and Comparative Study," for which she also authored a book with the same title. Ms. Wasserman's expertise on Honoré Daumier led to many accolades, including being acknowledged at the Daumier Symposium at the Musée D'Orsay in Paris in 1999. Throughout her life, Ms. Wasserman was a regular on museum boards and committees, often playing an integral role in collections development.

After her husband's death in 1986, Ms. Wasserman began teaching at the Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement (HILR) and was honored by the Institute by being named a Distinguished Member in 2000. She also served as a trustee of the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art, Brandeis' Rose Art Museum, and on Harvard's Committee to Visit the Fine Arts, and the Cambridge Public Art Commission. In addition to being a scholar of art, Ms. Wasserman was also passionate about women's rights, and was instrumental in leading the fight for women's right to birth control and in helping launch Planned Parenthood in Massachusetts.

Jeanne Wasserman died in Cambridge, Massachusetts on January 21, 2006.

From the guide to the Papers, 1952-2004, (Harvard Art Museums Archives)

Jeanne Wasserman (nee Leonard) was born March 19, 1915 in New York City, later moving to New Rochelle, New York. Ms. Wasserman's family, of German-Jewish descent, immigrated to the United States in the pre-Civil War era. Wasserman's grandfather was a successful businessman, who paid for Jeanne's private high school and later, her college education at Radcliffe College, which culminated in a degree in English literature in 1936.

Ms. Wasserman met her husband, Max Wasserman, on a blind date, shortly before her graduation from Radcliffe. The two married in 1938, after Jeanne was convinced Max could support her. Ms. Wasserman began her career doing the advertising for her husband's business, Wasco Flashing. When he sold the business in the 1950's to work in real estate, Ms. Wasserman began working in the art field.

Having taken classes at the Fogg Art Museum while she was at Radcliffe, Ms. Wasserman was eager to return, and did so in 1962, as a research assistant to then director, John Coolidge. In 1969, she was named the Honorary Curator of 19th- and 20th-Century Sculpture, a position she held for about 2 decades. While at the Fogg, Ms. Wasserman was in charge of a number of renowned exhibitions, including "Daumier Sculpture: A Critical and Comparative Study," for which she also authored a book with the same title. Ms. Wasserman's expertise on Honoré Daumier led to many accolades, including being acknowledged at the Daumier Symposium at the Musée D'Orsay in Paris in 1999.

After her husband's death in 1986, Ms. Wasserman began teaching at the Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement and was honored by the Institute by being named as a Distinguished Member in 2000. She also served as a trustee of the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art, and on Harvard's Committee to Visit the Fine Arts, and the Cambridge Public Art Commission.

The Wassermans had three children, Peter, Suzanne, and Nancy. In addition to being a scholar of art, Ms. Wasserman was also passionate about women's rights, and was instrumental in leading the fight for women's right to birth control and in helping launch Planned Parenthood in Massachusetts.

From the guide to the Papers of the Fogg Art Museum Honorary Curator of Sculpture, 1960-1987., (Harvard Art Museums Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith 180 Beacon Collection of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.) corporateBody
associatedWith Ahearn, John person
associatedWith Alison Wilding person
associatedWith Anthony Caro person
associatedWith Antony Gormley person
associatedWith Archipenko person
associatedWith Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964 person
associatedWith Aristide Maillol person
associatedWith Arneson person
associatedWith Barye, Antoine-Louis, 1796-1875 person
associatedWith Borofsky, Jonathan person
associatedWith Brandeis University corporateBody
associatedWith Caesar, Doris person
associatedWith Callery, Mary person
associatedWith Coolidge, John, 1913-1995. person
associatedWith Daniel Chester French's person
associatedWith Daumier, Honoré, 1808-1879 person
associatedWith Džamonja person
associatedWith Edgar Peters Bowron person
associatedWith Ellen Driscoll person
associatedWith Falguière, Jean-Alexander-Joseph 1831-1900 person
associatedWith Fogg Art Museum. corporateBody
associatedWith Frey, Viola person
associatedWith Georg Baselitz person
associatedWith Harvard Art Museums. corporateBody
associatedWith Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement. corporateBody
associatedWith Harvard University. corporateBody
associatedWith Harvard University Museums. corporateBody
associatedWith Harvard University. Museums corporateBody
associatedWith Heckel person
associatedWith Henry Moore person
associatedWith Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston Mass.) corporateBody
associatedWith Jacques Lipchitz person
associatedWith Jane Tavarelli person
associatedWith Jean Alexandre Joseph Falguière person
associatedWith Joan Miro person
associatedWith Katherine Lane Weems person
associatedWith Lachaise person
associatedWith Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935 person
associatedWith Lee Bontecue person
associatedWith Lichtenstein person
associatedWith Marisol person
associatedWith Maryhill corporateBody
associatedWith Massachusetts Institute of Technology corporateBody
associatedWith Meira Perry person
associatedWith Mira Jacob. person
associatedWith MIT List Visual Arts Center. corporateBody
associatedWith Mongan, Agnes, person
associatedWith Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Withers Collection person
associatedWith Musée d'Orsay corporateBody
associatedWith Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. corporateBody
associatedWith Nadelman person
associatedWith Nadelman, Elie, 1882-1946 person
associatedWith Nicolas de Staël person
associatedWith Niki de Saint Phalle person
associatedWith Nolde person
associatedWith Oberlin corporateBody
associatedWith Orswell, Lois person
associatedWith Pondick, Rona person
associatedWith Radcliffe College. corporateBody
associatedWith Radcliffe College Alumnae Association. corporateBody
associatedWith Raoul Dufy person
associatedWith Redon, Odilon 1840-1916 person
associatedWith Rhode Island School of Design. corporateBody
associatedWith Richard Diebenkorn person
associatedWith Robbins, Daniel 1947- person
associatedWith Rodin, Auguste 1840-1917 person
associatedWith Ron Onorato person
associatedWith Rose Art Museum corporateBody
associatedWith Saar, Alison person
correspondedWith Seymour Slive person
associatedWith Shapiro, Joel person
associatedWith Slive, Seymour, 1920- person
associatedWith Smith College Museum of Art corporateBody
associatedWith Smith, Kiki person
associatedWith Smithsonian Institution corporateBody
associatedWith Torf, Lois person
associatedWith Wasserman, Max, 1913-1986. person
associatedWith Wellesley corporateBody
associatedWith Women's Caucus for Art. corporateBody
associatedWith Yarlow, Loretta person
associatedWith Zabriskie corporateBody
associatedWith Zagreb person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Massachusetts
United States
Massachusetts--Boston
United States
United States
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Cambridge (Mass.)
Massachusetts--Cambridge
Massachusetts--Boston
Cambridge--Massachusetts
Massachusetts--Cambridge
Subject
Art--Criticism and interpretation
Museum loans
Art museums--Employees
Art museums
Art--Private collections
Outdoor sculpture
Committees
Sculpture--20th century
Sculpture--20th century--Exhibitions
Travel
Museums--Acquisitions
Art Forgeries
Art in education
Sculpture--Conservation and restoration
College art museums
Art and architecture
Art, American
Writing
Museum publications
Harvard University--History--20th Century
Sculpture--Attribution
Museum collection
Museum curators
Art museums--Exhibitions
Art--Conservation and restoration
Art museums--History
Art museum curators
Art museums--Collections management
Musems
Art--History--Study and teaching (higher)
Art Exhibition Catalogs
Museum exhibits--Planning
Exhibitions
Art--Exhibitions--Planning
Sculpture, French--19th century
Museum exhibits
Artists
Art dealers
Sculpture--Catalogs
Museums
Sculpture
Sculpture--French
Art--Exhibitions
Art objects--Criticism and interpretation
Art objects--Collectors and collecting
Art museums--Educational aspects
Art in universities and colleges
Art--Collectors and collecting
Art--Study and teaching
Art, Modern--20th century
Art historians
Occupation
Function

Person

Birth 1915-03-19

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