Brinnin, John Malcolm, 1916-....

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John Malcolm Brinnin (1916-1998) was a poet, critic, anthologist, and teacher who, among other accomplishments, helped to popularize Welsh poet Dylan Thomas in the United States as well as establishing the 92nd Street Y in New York City as a center for literary activity. A successful poet, Brinnin also authored a number of biographies as well as several works on travel.

From the description of John Malcolm Brinnin papers, 1930-1981. (University of Delaware Library). WorldCat record id: 551681419

John Malcolm Brinnin (1916-1998) was an award winning poet and biographer, responsible for first bringing poet Dylan Thomas to America. Greek-American scholar and poet Kimon Friar (1911-1993) translated the work of many Greek poets and writers.

From the description of Collection of John Malcolm Brinnin - Kimon Friar correspondence and Brinnin literary manuscripts, 1933-1988 (bulk 1936-1950). (University of Delaware Library). WorldCat record id: 667240938

Evory, Ann (ed.). Contemporary Authors New Revision Series, Volume 1. Detroit: Gale Research Co., 1981. p. 72. Gerber, Philip L. "John Malcolm Brinnin." Dictionary of Literary Biography Volume 48: American Poets, 1880–1945, Second Series. Detroit: Gale Research Co., 1986. pp. 52-57. Locher, Frances Carol (ed.). Contemporary Authors Volumes 85-88. Detroit: Gale Research Co., 1980. pp. 189-190.

John Malcolm Brinnin (1916–1998) was an award winning poet and biographer, responsible for first bringing poet Dylan Thomas to America.

John Malcolm Brinnin was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on September 13, 1916, to John A. Brinnin and Frances Malcolm Brinnin. When he was young his family moved to Detroit, Michigan. Brinnin graduated from the University of Michigan in 1942 and within a year entered graduate school at Harvard University.

Brinnin, who was also a critic, anthologist, and teacher, taught at Vassar, Boston University, the University of Connecticut, and Harvard. He was Director of the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association Poetry Center (the 92nd Street Y) in New York City during one of the Center's most successful periods (1949–1956).

Brinnin was the first person to bring Welsh poet Dylan Thomas to the United States and was responsible for all of Dylan Thomas's reading tours in this country. Brinnin's best known work, Dylan Thomas in America, published in 1955, provides a personal memoir of Dylan Thomas's trips to America as Brinnin observed them, and carries a moving account of the period of Thomas's death in 1953. Dylan Thomas in America was made into the 1964 Broadway play, Dylan. Brinnin later narrated a motion picture, The Days of Dylan Thomas .

John Malcolm Brinnin published a number of collections of poems. Brinnin's first collection of verse, The Garden is Political, was published in 1942. Subsequent collections of poems include The Lincoln Lyrics (1942), No Arch, No Triumph (1945), The Sorrows of Cold Stone (1951), and Selected Poems of John Malcolm Brinnin (1963). Skin Diving in the Virgins, and Other Poems (1970) was Brinnin's final collection of published poetry, although he continued to tinker with a number of abandoned poems until his death.

In 1955 the Poetry Society of America awarded Brinnin its Gold Medal for Distinguished Service to Poetry. Following the publication of his Selected Poems in 1963, Brinnin was awarded the Centennial Medal for Distinction in Literature by his alma mater, the University of Michigan.

In addition to writing poetry, Brinnin edited a literary journal, Signatures (1936–1938), and compiled several anthologies of modern poetry. Brinnin's two popular works on transatlantic travel, The Sway of the Grand Saloon: A Social History of the North Atlantic (1971) and Beau Voyage: Life Aboard the Last Great Ships (1981), reflect his lifelong love of travel, particularly crossing the Atlantic on luxury liners.

John Malcolm Brinnin authored biographies of Gertrude Stein ( The Third Rose, 1959) and Truman Capote ( Truman Capote: Dear Heart, Old Buddy, 1986). His work, Sextet (1981), included biographical sketches of Truman Capote; Henri Cartier-Bresson; Elizabeth Bowen; Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell Sitwell; Alice B. Toklas; and T. S. Eliot. In addition, he wrote a critical work on William Carlos Williams.

John Malcolm Brinnin died at his home in Key West, Florida, on June 25, 1998.

Greek-American scholar and poet Kimon Friar (1911–1993) translated the work of many Greek poets and writers.

Kimon Friar was born November 18, 1911 in Imrali, Turkey. Friar was naturalized as an American citizen in 1920. Friar attended the Art Institute of Chicago (1929), and Yale University (1932) before receiving a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin in 1934. In 1939 he received an M.A. from the University of Michigan. He pursued additional graduate study at the State University of Iowa in 1940.

Kimon Friar is a poet, translator, editor, critic, and teacher. He taught at Adelphi College (1940–1945), Amherst College (1945–1946), New York University (1952–1953), and the University of Minnesota (1953–1954). He has been a visiting professor at the University of California, the University of Illinois, the University of Indiana, Ohio State University, and other universities and institutions in Greece and South America.

Friar has translated and edited a variety of works by Greek poets and writers, including Nikos Kazantzakis, Theodore Roubanis, Miltos Sahtouris, Odysseus Elytis, Takis Sinopoulos, Yannis Ritsos, Manolis Anagnostakis and Kostas Kindinis. One of his most notable works is his translation of Nikos Kazantzakis' epic poem, "Odhisia," as The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel .

While he was Director of the YMHA Poetry Center (1944–1947) Friar edited The Poetry Center Presents (1947), an anthology of material presented at the New York center. Also in the 1940s he co-edited with Brinnin the anthology, Modern Poetry: American and British (1951).

He has contributed articles, poems, and translations to American and Greek newspapers and periodicals, including Poetry, Saturday Review, New Republic, New York Times Book Review, Quarterly Review of Literature, Books Abroad, Chicago Review, and Atlantic . In addition he was founder and editor of Charioteer (1960–1962) and Greek Heritage (1963–1965).

From the guide to the Collection of John Malcolm Brinnin - Kimon Friar correspondence and Brinnin literary manuscripts, 1933–1988, 1936–1950, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

John Malcolm Brinnin (1916–1998) was a poet, critic, anthologist, and teacher who, among other accomplishments, helped to popularize Welsh poet Dylan Thomas in the United States as well as establishing the 92nd Street Y in New York City as a center for literary activity. A successful poet, Brinnin also authored a number of biographies as well as several works on travel.

Brinnin was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on September 13, 1916, to John A. Brinnin and Frances Malcolm Brinnin. When he was young his family moved to Detroit, Michigan. Brinnin graduated from the University of Michigan in 1942 and within a year entered graduate school at Harvard University.

Brinnin, who was also a critic, anthologist, and teacher, taught at Vassar, Boston University, the University of Connecticut, and Harvard. He was Director of the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association Poetry Center (the 92nd Street Y) in New York City during one of the Center's most successful periods (1949–1956).

Brinnin was the first person to bring Welsh poet Dylan Thomas to the United States and was responsible for all of Dylan Thomas's reading tours in this country. Brinnin's best known work, Dylan Thomas in America, published in 1955, provides a personal memoir of Dylan Thomas's trips to America as Brinnin observed them, and carries a moving account of the period of Thomas's death in 1953. Dylan Thomas in America was made into the 1964 Broadway play, Dylan. Brinnin later narrated a motion picture, The Days of Dylan Thomas .

John Malcolm Brinnin published a number of collections of poems. Brinnin's first collection of verse, The Garden is Political, was published in 1942. Subsequent collections of poems include The Lincoln Lyrics (1942), No Arch, No Triumph (1945), The Sorrows of Cold Stone (1951), and Selected Poems of John Malcolm Brinnin (1963). Skin Diving in the Virgins, and Other Poems (1970) was Brinnin's final collection of published poetry, although he continued to tinker with a number of abandoned poems until his death.

In 1955 the Poetry Society of America awarded Brinnin its Gold Medal for Distinguished Service to Poetry. Following the publication of his Selected Poems in 1963, Brinnin was awarded the Centennial Medal for Distinction in Literature by his alma mater, the University of Michigan.

In addition to writing poetry, Brinnin edited a literary journal, Signatures (1936–1938), and compiled several anthologies of modern poetry. Brinnin's two popular works on transatlantic travel, The Sway of the Grand Saloon: A Social History of the North Atlantic (1971) and Beau Voyage: Life Abroad the Last Great Ships (1981), reflect his lifelong love of travel, particularly crossing the Atlantic on luxury liners.

John Malcolm Brinnin authored biographies of Gertrude Stein ( The Third Rose, 1959) and Truman Capote ( Truman Capote: Dear Heart, Old Buddy, 1986). His work, Sextet (1981), included biographical sketches of Truman Capote; Henri Cartier-Bresson; Elizabeth Bowen; Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell Sitwell; Alice B. Toklas; and T. S. Eliot. In addition, he wrote a critical work on William Carlos Williams.

John Malcolm Brinnin died at his home in Key West, Florida, on June 25, 1998.

Evory, Ann (ed.) Contemporary Authors. New Revision Series, Volume 1. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1981. p. 72. Quartermain, Peter (ed.) Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 48: American Poets, 1880–1945, Second Series. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1986. pp 52–57. Stewart, Barbara. "John Malcolm Brinnin, Poet and Biographer, Dies at 81," The New York Times. 1998 Jun 30.

From the guide to the John Malcolm Brinnin papers, 1930–1981, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Co-edited by John Hinsdale Thompson and John Malcolm Brinnin and based in Detroit, Signatures was a literary magazine of "works-to-be-published-later" written by contemporary American and international writers. Subtitled "Work in Progress," Signatures was first published in the Spring of 1936 and continued for a total of three issues, ceasing publication in 1938. Signatures featured fiction by Katherine Anne Porter, James T. Farrell, Kay Boyle, Sean O'Faolain, as well as poetry by Kenneth Patchen, Muriel Rukeyser, and Louis MacNeice; and critical essays by Horace Gregory, Newton Arvin, and Granville Hicks. Brinnin and Thompson planned to publish Signatures semi-annually and were quoted as saying that in each issue they hoped "to publish the best available work for forthcoming books by established authors, as well as unusual work by younger unknown writers. These selections, whether from a novel, a volume of poetry, or a book of short stories, will be integrated portions of entire works and may be read as experimental excerpts or, equally well, with the idea of anticipating the trend of newer work by represented authors."

Hoffman, Frederick J., Charles Allen, and Carolyn F. Ulrich. The Little Magazine: a history and a bibliography. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1946. p. 336. Information derived from collection.

John Hinsdale Thompson was co-editor of Signatures, along with his lifelong friend, John Malcolm Brinnin. The two had known each other as undergraduates at the University of Michigan. Brinnin, as editor of Prelude; an expression of youth, a Detroit literary magazine, published Thompson's short stories, in 1934 and 1935.

During the years in which he edited Signatures, Thompson was working on a novel that was based on his experiences while a resident in Detroit. In the final issue of Signatures, "World Series," a chapter from Thompson's novel, appeared under the pseudonym Leslie Sellers. Following the appearance of "World Series," several publishing houses expressed interest in reading the finished novel. However, it is uncertain whether the novel was ever completed. Thompson also wrote prose and poetry. One of his essays, "Advice for Writers," appeared in a 1935 issue of The Passing Show, a Detroit magazine focusing on art and literature.

In 1947 Thompson was hired as an instructor of English at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri, where he served until the late 1960s. At the time of his death, in 1973, Thompson was residing in Columbia, Missouri, with his wife Margaret Thompson.

Biographical information on John Thompson was derived from files in this collection and the John Malcolm Brinnin Papers (Mss 103).

American poet and biographer John Malcolm Brinnin was also a critic, anthologist, and teacher. He taught at Vassar, Boston University, University of Connecticut, and Harvard. He was Director of the YMHA Poetry Center in New York City during its most successful years (1949–1956).

Brinnin was the first person to bring Dylan Thomas to the United States and was responsible for all of Dylan Thomas' reading tours in America. Brinnin's best known work, Dylan Thomas in America, published in 1955, provides a personal memoir of Dylan Thomas' trips to America as observed while traveling with Thomas for the national series of readings. The book carries a moving account of Thomas' death in 1953. Brinnin later narrated a motion picture, The Days of Dylan Thomas .

John Malcolm Brinnin was most deservedly known for his poetry and has published a number of collections of poems. Brinnin's first collection of verse, The Garden is Political, was published in 1942; subsequent collections of poems include The Lincoln Lyrics (1942), No Arch, No Triumph (1945), The Sorrows of Cold Stone (1951), Selected Poems of John Malcolm Brinnin (1963), and Skin Diving in the Virgins, and Other Poems (1970).

In 1955 the Poetry Society of America awarded Brinnin its Gold Medal for Distinguished Service to Poetry. Following the publication of his Selected Poems in 1963, Brinnin was awarded the Centennial Medal for Distinction in Literature by his alma mater, the University of Michigan.

In addition to writing poetry, Brinnin co-edited Signatures ; compiled several anthologies of modern poetry; and wrote popular works on transatlantic travel, including The Sway of the Grand Saloon: A Social History of the North Atlantic (1971) and Beau Voyage: Life Abroad the Last Great Ships (1981).

John Malcolm Brinnin authored biographies of Gertrude Stein ( The Third Rose, 1959) and Truman Capote ( Truman Capote: Dear Heart, Old Buddy, 1986). His 1981 work, Sextet, includes biographical sketches of Truman Capote; Henri Cartier-Bresson; Elizabeth Bowen; Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell Sitwell; Alice B. Toklas; and T. S. Eliot. In addition, he wrote a critical work on William Carlos Williams.

On June 28, 1998, John Malcolm Brinnin died at his home in Key West, Florida.

Evory, Ann (ed.) Contemporary Authors. New Revision Series, Volume 1. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1981. p. 72. Quartermain, Peter (ed.) Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 48: American Poets, 1880-1945, Second Series. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1986. Pp 52-57. Stewart, Barbara. "John Malcolm Brinnin, Poet and Biographer, Dies at 81," New York Times. June 30, 1998. p. A22.

From the guide to the Signatures, archive, 1933–1972, 1935–1940, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Poet and biographer John Malcolm Brinnin was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on September 13, 1916, to John A. Brinnin and Frances Malcolm Brinnin. When he was young his family moved to Detroit, Michigan. Brinnin graduated from the University of Michigan in 1942 and within a year entered graduate school at Harvard University.

Brinnin, who was also a critic, anthologist, and teacher, taught at Vassar, Boston University, the University of Connecticut, and Harvard. He was Director of the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association Poetry Center (the 92nd Street Y) in New York City during one of the Center's most successful periods (1949-1956).

Brinnin was the first person to bring Welsh poet Dylan Thomas to the United States and was responsible for all of Dylan Thomas's reading tours in this country. Brinnin's best known work, Dylan Thomas in America, published in 1955, provides a personal memoir of Dylan Thomas's trips to America as Brinnin observed them, and carries a moving account of the period of Thomas's death in 1953. Dylan Thomas in America was made into the 1964 Broadway play, Dylan. Brinnin later narrated a motion picture, The Days of Dylan Thomas .

John Malcolm Brinnin published a number of collections of poems. Brinnin's first collection of verse, The Garden is Political, was published in 1942. Subsequent collections of poems include The Lincoln Lyrics (1942), No Arch, No Triumph (1945), The Sorrows of Cold Stone (1951), and Selected Poems of John Malcolm Brinnin (1963). Skin Diving in the Virgins, and Other Poems (1970) was Brinnin's final collection of published poetry, although he continued to tinker with a number of abandoned poems until his death.

In 1955 the Poetry Society of America awarded Brinnin its Gold Medal for Distinguished Service to Poetry. Following the publication of his Selected Poems in 1963, Brinnin was awarded the Centennial Medal for Distinction in Literature by his alma mater, the University of Michigan.

In addition to writing poetry, Brinnin edited a literary journal, Signatures (1936-1938), and compiled several anthologies of modern poetry. Brinnin's two popular works on transatlantic travel, The Sway of the Grand Saloon: A Social History of the North Atlantic (1971) and Beau Voyage: Life Aboard the Last Great Ships (1981), reflect his lifelong love of travel, particularly crossing the Atlantic on luxury liners.

John Malcolm Brinnin authored biographies of Gertrude Stein ( The Third Rose, 1959) and Truman Capote ( Truman Capote: Dear Heart, Old Buddy, 1986). His work, Sextet (1981), included biographical sketches of Truman Capote; Henri Cartier-Bresson; Elizabeth Bowen; Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell Sitwell; Alice B. Toklas; and T. S. Eliot. In addition, he wrote a critical work on William Carlos Williams.

John Malcolm Brinnin died at his home in Key West, Florida, on June 25, 1998.

Evory, Ann (ed.) Contemporary Authors. New Revision Series, Volume 1. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1981. p. 72. Quartermain, Peter (ed.) Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 48: American Poets, 1880-1945, Second Series. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1986. Pp 52-57. Stewart, Barbara. "John Malcolm Brinnin, Poet and Biographer, Dies at 81," The New York Times. 1998 Jun 30.

From the guide to the John Malcolm Brinnin Letters to John Matthew O’Shea, 1977–1991, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Rosenberger, Francis Coleman, 1915-. Papers of [Francis] Coleman Rosenberger, 1946-1952. University of Virginia. Library
creatorOf Thomas, Dylan, 1914-1953. Dylan Thomas collection of papers, [1935]-1965. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Manuscript (periodical) Records, 1933-1937 Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries
creatorOf John Malcolm Brinnin Letters to John Matthew O’Shea, 1977–1991 University of Delaware Library - Special Collections
referencedIn New Directions Publishing Corp. records, ca. 1933-1997. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Poets' Theatre (Cambridge, Mass.) records, 1936-1989 (inclusive), 1950-1960 (bulk). Harvard University, Houghton Library
referencedIn Papers, 1920-1995. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Poetry mss., 1954-2002 Lilly Library (Indiana University, Bloomington)http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly
creatorOf Albee, George Sumner, 1905-1964. Collection of letters to Kyle Crichton from leftist activists, screenwriters, novelists, literary critics, fans, etc., [1927]-1960. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Anne Sexton Papers 122492286., 1912-1996, (bulk 1953-1974) Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Hardwick, Elizabeth. Papers, 1934-1991 (bulk 1960-1990). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946. Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas papers, 1837-1961. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
creatorOf Brinnin, John Malcolm, 1916-. John Malcolm Brinnin poems, 1938 and 1941. University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library
referencedIn Additional papers, 1917-1962 and undated. Houghton Library.
referencedIn O'Donnell, George Marion, 1914-1962. Papers, 1932-1961. Washington University in St. Louis, .
referencedIn George Economou Papers, 1954-1996. Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
creatorOf John Malcolm Brinnin papers, 1930–1981 University of Delaware Library - Special Collections
referencedIn Sitwell, Edith, 1887-1964. Autograph letter signed : London, to Jane Clark, "Monday" [1956]. Pierpont Morgan Library.
creatorOf Stallman, R. W. (Robert Wooster), 1911-1982. Papers of Robert Wooster Stallman [manuscript] 1935-1962. University of Virginia. Library
referencedIn Voice of America (Organization). Voice of America Forum Lectures in American Poetry series scripts, circa 1965. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Dylan Thomas Collection TXRC06-A2., 1920-1991 Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
creatorOf Brinnin, John Malcolm, 1916-. Signatures archive, 1933-1972 (bulk 1935-1940). University of Delaware Library, Hugh M Morris Library
referencedIn Economou, George. George Economou papers, 1954-1996. Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Libraries
creatorOf Thomas, Dylan, 1914-1953. Ephemera, 1954-1962. Rosenbach Museum & Library
creatorOf Brinnin, John Malcolm, 1916-. John Malcolm Brinnin papers, 1930-1981. University of Delaware Library, Hugh M Morris Library
referencedIn Records, 1947-1976 The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.
creatorOf Brinnin, John Malcolm, 1916-. Collection of John Malcolm Brinnin - Kimon Friar correspondence and Brinnin literary manuscripts, 1933-1988 (bulk 1936-1950). University of Delaware Library, Hugh M Morris Library
referencedIn Woodberry Poetry Room (Harvard College Library) poetry readings, 1931- (ongoing). Woodberry Poetry Room, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University
creatorOf Bishop, Elizabeth, 1911-1979. Typed and autograph letters signed : to José Rodríguez Feo, 1944-1965. Pierpont Morgan Library.
referencedIn Bishop, Elizabeth, 1911-1979. Elizabeth Bishop papers, 1911-1993 (bulk 1929-1979). Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Thomas, Dylan, 1914-1953. Dylan Thomas articles and papers, 1952-1954. Pennsylvania State University Libraries
referencedIn E. E. Cummings additional papers, 1870-1969. Houghton Library.
creatorOf James Joyce Society (New York, N.Y.). Records, 1947-1976. New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Yaddo records, 1870-1980 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
referencedIn New Directions Publishing Corp. records, ca. 1933-1997. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Cleverdon mss. II, 1926-1988 Lilly Library (Indiana University, Bloomington)http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly
referencedIn E. E. Cummings additional papers, 1870-1969. Houghton Library.
creatorOf Poulin, A. Office files of The American Poetry Review, 1972-1982. University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt Library
referencedIn Dylan Thomas collection of papers, 1935]-1965 The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.
referencedIn New Yorker records, ca.1924-1984 New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division
creatorOf Signatures, archive, 1933–1972, 1935–1940 University of Delaware Library - Special Collections
creatorOf Collection of John Malcolm Brinnin - Kimon Friar correspondence and Brinnin literary manuscripts, 1933–1988, 1936–1950 University of Delaware Library - Special Collections
referencedIn Elizabeth Hardwick Papers TXRC93-A46., 1934-1991 Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn L. E. Sissman additional papers, 1946-1989. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Papers, 1944-1981. Houghton Library.
creatorOf Sexton, Anne, 1928-1974. Anne Sexton Papers, 1912-1996, (bulk 1953-1974). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Sitwell, Edith, 1887-1964. Autograph letter signed : New York, to Kenneth Clark, 1953 Nov. 17. Pierpont Morgan Library.
creatorOf Shelley, Philip Allison, 1907-. Philip Allison Shelley correspondence related to the Simmons Series, 1947-1959. Pennsylvania State University Libraries
creatorOf Miller, Charles H. (Charles Henry). Auden Papers, [1941]-1988 ; bulk 1978-1983. University of Michigan
creatorOf Moss, Howard, 1922-1987. Papers, ca. 1935-1987, bulk (1961-1987). New York Public Library System, NYPL
referencedIn Woodberry Poetry Room (Harvard College Library) poetry readings, 1931- (ongoing). Woodberry Poetry Room, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University
referencedIn Gordon Cairnie papers, 1922-1973. Houghton Library.
referencedIn Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas papers, 1837-1961 Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Dylan Thomas Collection TXRC06-A2., 1920-1991 Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
referencedIn Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946. Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas papers, 1837-1961. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Hayden, Robert Earl. Robert Hayden letters to John Hinsdale Thompson, 1945-1952. Pennsylvania State University Libraries
creatorOf Carpenter, Margaret Haley. Papers of Margaret Haley Carpenter [manuscript], 1898-1985, bulk 1953-1985. University of Virginia. Library
creatorOf Taylor, Peter, 1917-1994. Papers of Peter Hillsman Taylor, 1939-1977 [manuscript]. University of Virginia. Library
referencedIn Pedro Salinas papers, ca. 1912-1975 (inclusive), 1936-1951 (bulk). Houghton Library.
referencedIn Bishop, Elizabeth, 1911-1979. Papers, 1925-1979. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn E. E. Cummings papers, 1870-1969. Houghton Library.
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Bishop, Elizabeth, 1911-1979. person
correspondedWith Cairnie, Gordon. person
associatedWith Carpenter, Margaret Haley. person
associatedWith Cleverdon, Douglas. person
correspondedWith Cummings, E. E. (Edward Estlin), 1894-1962 person
associatedWith Economou, George. person
associatedWith Economou, George. person
associatedWith Hardwick, Elizabeth, 1916-2007 person
associatedWith Hayden, Robert Earl. person
associatedWith James Joyce Society (New York, N.Y.) corporateBody
associatedWith Levin, Harry, 1912-1994 person
associatedWith Manuscript (Athens, Ohio) corporateBody
associatedWith Miller, Charles H. (Charles Henry) person
associatedWith Modern Poetry Association corporateBody
associatedWith Moss, Howard, 1922-1987. person
associatedWith New Directions Publishing Corp. corporateBody
correspondedWith New Yorker Magazine, Inc corporateBody
correspondedWith O'Donnell, George Marion, 1914-1962. person
associatedWith Poets' Theatre (Cambridge, Mass.). corporateBody
associatedWith Poulin, A. person
associatedWith Rosenberger, Francis Coleman, 1915- person
correspondedWith Salinas, Pedro, 1892-1951 person
associatedWith Sexton, Anne, 1928-1974 person
associatedWith Shelley, Philip Allison, 1907- person
correspondedWith Sissman, L. E., 1928-1976 person
associatedWith Sitwell, Edith, 1887-1964. person
associatedWith Stallman, R. W. (Robert Wooster), 1911-1982. person
associatedWith Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946. person
associatedWith Taylor, Peter, 1917-1994. person
correspondedWith Thomas, Dylan, 1914-1953 person
associatedWith Voice of America (Organization) corporateBody
associatedWith Woodberry Poetry Room (Harvard College Library). corporateBody
associatedWith Yaddo (Artist's colony) corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
Subject
Poetry
Occupation
Function

Person

Birth 1916-09-13

Death 1998-06-25

Americans

English

Information

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