Black Emergency Cultural Coalition

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Black Emergency Cultural Coalition

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Name :

Black Emergency Cultural Coalition

BECC

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BECC

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Exist Dates

Exist Dates - Date Range

1971

active 1971

Active

1984

active 1984

Active

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Biographical History

Black Emergency Cultural Coalition Inc. (BECC) was organized in January 1969 by a group of African American artists in response to the Metropolitan Museum of Art's "Harlem on My Mind" exhibit, which omitted the contributions of African American painters and sculptors to the Harlem community. Members of this initial group that protested against the exhibit included several prominent African American artists, including Benny Andrews and Clifford R. Joseph, cofounders of the BECC. The primary goal of the group was to agitate for change in the major art museums in New York City for greater representation of African American artists and their work in these museums, and that an African American curatorial presence would be established.

In 1971 the work of the coalition grew to include the creation of an Arts Exchange program in correctional facilities. This program arose in response to major riots at the Attica correctional facility in New York. The BECC was incorporated in 1972 as a non-profit organization. The initial directors of this newly incorporated organization were Clifford R. Joseph, Benny Andrews, Camille Billops, Vivian Browne and Russell Thompson. The BECC sponsored arts programs in juvenile detention centers and mental health facilities throughout the United States.

BECC published a newsletter with contributing articles from its members chronicling their arts program activities, and Benny Andrews, co-chairman of the Coalition published several articles about the BECC's experiences in newspapers and art journals across the country.

From the description of Black Emergency Cultural Coalition records, 1971-1984. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 144675656

Black Emergency Cultural Coalition Inc. (BECC) was organized in January 1969 by a group of African American artists in response to the Metropolitan Museum of Art's 2Harlem on My Mind3 exhibit, which omitted the contributions of African American painters and sculptors to the Harlem community. Members of this initial group that protested against the exhibit included several prominent African American artists, including Benny Andrews and Clifford R. Joseph, cofounders of the BECC. The primary goal of the group was to agitate for change in the major art museums in New York City for greater representation of African American artists and their work in these museums, and that an African American curatorial presence would be established.

In 1971 the work of the coalition grew to include the creation of an Arts Exchange program in correctional facilities. This program arose in response to major riots at the Attica correctional facility in New York. The BECC was incorporated in 1972 as a non-profit organization. The initial directors of this newly incorporated organization were Clifford R. Joseph, Benny Andrews, Camille Billops, Vivian Browne and Russell Thompson. The BECC sponsored arts programs in juvenile detention centers and mental health facilities throughout the United States.

BECC published a newsletter with contributing articles from its members chronicling their arts program activities, and Benny Andrews, co-chairman of the Coalition published several articles about the BECC's experiences in newspapers and art journals across the country.

From the guide to the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition records, 1971-1984, (The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.)

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External Related CPF

https://viaf.org/viaf/143542576

https://www.worldcat.org/identities/lccn-nr2005025067

https://id.loc.gov/authorities/nr2005025067

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Languages Used

Subjects

Xangô (Cult)

Xangô (Cult)

African American art

African American art

African American artists

Black arts movement

Civil rights movements in art

Civil rights movements in art

Prisoners as artists

Prisoners as artists

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Activities

Occupations

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Places

United States

as recorded (not vetted)

AssociatedPlace

New York (State)--New York

as recorded (not vetted)

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Convention Declarations

<conventionDeclaration><citation>VIAF</citation></conventionDeclaration>

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Identity Constellation Identifier(s)

w6vh9k8s

53788757