Office files : of The American Poetry Review, 1974-1980.

ArchivalResource

Jordan, June, 1936-2002. Office files : of The American Poetry Review, 1974-1980.

Office files : of The American Poetry Review, 1974-1980.

Comprises 37 items, 38 leaves correspondence plus manuscripts for publication. Contains letter to Jordan from Doris Grumbach. Also includes letter from Beacon Press.

6 folders.

Related Entities

There are 3 Entities related to this resource.

Jordan, June, 1936-2002

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ww7zht (person)

June Jordan was born in Harlem, New York on July 9, 1936. Jordan fostered a love of literature and writing poetry as a child. She attended Barnard College and University of Chicago. June Jordan married in 1955 and had one child. A poet, novelist, essayist, editor and children's author, Jordan published her first poetry collection, Who Look at Me, in 1969. Jordan was a visiting scholar/poet at many institutions, including MacAlester College, City College of the City University of New York, Univer...

Grumbach, Doris.

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mk6gqr (person)

Doris Grumbach is a novelist, biographer, and literary critic. Her published works include a biography of Mary McCarthy, THE COMPANY SHE KEPT (1976), the novel CHAMBER MUSIC (1979), and the memoir COMING INTO THE END ZONE (1991). She has served as literary editor of THE NEW REPUBLIC and on the faculties of the College of Saint Rose (Albany, NY), American University (Washington, DC) and the Writer's Workshop of the University of Iowa. Her book reviews and essays have appeared in numerous literary...

Beacon Press

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6032njn (corporateBody)

The Beacon Press, a department of the Unitarian Universalist Association, traces its beginnings to 1854 when the American Unitarian Association raised $50,000 for a Book Fund Project. The AUA "issued an urgent call for liberal works that would meet the spiritual needs of the age." Until 1950, the strength of the Press was in history, biography, and a locus in religious thought and religious freedom. Melvin Arnold became the director of the Press in the late 1940s, and he transformed it into a wi...